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NEWS
March 19, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court announced Monday that it will decide whether a Rhode Island high school may include a prayer in its graduation ceremony--a signal that it may be ready to permit a broader role for religion in schools and in public life. For at least two decades, the high court has been badly split on church and state issues, leading to a series of confused rulings on Christmas displays at city halls, prayers during public ceremonies and state aid to parochial schools.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2002 | RICHARD LEWIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The first sign that things are different at the Olneyville branch of the city library is the colored portraits on the building's facade. The enlarged negatives are of people who live in this run-down, forgotten section of the Renaissance City. They are from Guatemala, Cambodia, Peru and Hong Kong. Some look happy, some sad, others distant. Despite initial resistance, 17 students from the Rhode Island School of Design met Olneyville's residents and used art to show who they are.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1991 | LYLE DENNISTON, THE BALTIMORE SUN
A rabbi's prayers to God at a public school graduation ceremony in Rhode Island two years ago have led to a major new constitutional confrontation at the Supreme Court over religion in American public life. The confrontation is sweeping in its potential: It appears possible that the court could be persuaded to lower, or modify significantly, the "wall of separation" it has long maintained between government and religion.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court announced Monday that it will decide whether a Rhode Island high school may include a prayer in its graduation ceremony--a signal that it may be ready to permit a broader role for religion in schools and in public life. For at least two decades, the high court has been badly split on church and state issues, leading to a series of confused rulings on Christmas displays at city halls, prayers during public ceremonies and state aid to parochial schools.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | United Press International
City police, armed with lollipops, helped transport children to school Thursday in squad cars as a bus drivers' strike over safety concerns entered its fourth day. Mayor Joseph Paolino Jr. unveiled the emergency plan, dubbed Operation Lollipop, on Wednesday, saying that about 40 cruisers, three patrol wagons and five Fire Department cars would be used because of the limited number of school buses operating.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court announced Monday that it will decide whether a Rhode Island high school may include a prayer in its graduation ceremony--a signal that it may be ready to permit a broader role for religion in schools and in public life. For at least two decades, the high court has been badly split on church and state issues, leading to a series of confused rulings on Christmas displays at city halls, prayers during public ceremonies and state aid to parochial schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2002 | RICHARD LEWIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The first sign that things are different at the Olneyville branch of the city library is the colored portraits on the building's facade. The enlarged negatives are of people who live in this run-down, forgotten section of the Renaissance City. They are from Guatemala, Cambodia, Peru and Hong Kong. Some look happy, some sad, others distant. Despite initial resistance, 17 students from the Rhode Island School of Design met Olneyville's residents and used art to show who they are.
NEWS
February 6, 1985 | From Associated Press
Winter whipped the Northeast with up to 8 inches of snow today, turning highways into demolition derbies and closing schools in five states, while in the South heavy rain bloated rivers to the brim. In the Plains and Mississippi Valley, the thermostat was stuck below zero as far south as Arkansas, where the fifth person to die of hypothermia in a week, an elderly woman, was found huddled by her wood-burning stove. The punishing wave of stormy weather that began Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2010 | By Ching-Ching Ni
Most students in the Chinese language class at Cedarlane Middle School in Hacienda Heights have never heard of Confucius. "Con what?" asked Ricardo Ramirez, 11, who loves to impress classmates with his loud and clear greetings of "Hello!" and "I love you!" in Mandarin. But a proposal to bring more resources to his school's Chinese program has sparked heated debate over whether the Chinese government -- in the ancient philosopher's name -- should have a role in helping American schoolchildren learn.
SPORTS
May 6, 1997 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an attention-getting move by a publicity-seeking school, Rhode Island signed former UCLA coach Jim Harrick to a three-year contract Monday, ending Harrick's six-month stint in purgatory after he was fired by UCLA for ethical transgressions. Harrick, who was not interviewed for recent openings at other schools despite having led the Bruins to the 1995 national title, said he wanted to move beyond his bitter termination at UCLA by lifting the Rams to prominence.
NEWS
March 19, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court announced Monday that it will decide whether a Rhode Island high school may include a prayer in its graduation ceremony--a signal that it may be ready to permit a broader role for religion in schools and in public life. For at least two decades, the high court has been badly split on church and state issues, leading to a series of confused rulings on Christmas displays at city halls, prayers during public ceremonies and state aid to parochial schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1991 | LYLE DENNISTON, THE BALTIMORE SUN
A rabbi's prayers to God at a public school graduation ceremony in Rhode Island two years ago have led to a major new constitutional confrontation at the Supreme Court over religion in American public life. The confrontation is sweeping in its potential: It appears possible that the court could be persuaded to lower, or modify significantly, the "wall of separation" it has long maintained between government and religion.
NEWS
April 10, 1987 | United Press International
City police, armed with lollipops, helped transport children to school Thursday in squad cars as a bus drivers' strike over safety concerns entered its fourth day. Mayor Joseph Paolino Jr. unveiled the emergency plan, dubbed Operation Lollipop, on Wednesday, saying that about 40 cruisers, three patrol wagons and five Fire Department cars would be used because of the limited number of school buses operating.
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