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Rhodes Scholarships

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NEWS
December 12, 1988 | ROBERT WELKOS, Times Staff Writer
A Caltech doctoral candidate in physics who entered college at age 12 and a USC student who supports herself working as a part-time waitress were among seven California students who were named Sunday as recipients of prestigious Rhodes Scholarships. The scholarships, named after British diamond king Cecil Rhodes, provide for study at Oxford University in England.
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SPORTS
November 14, 2012 | Helene Elliott
Annie Lydens is accustomed to juggling a demanding academic schedule at Pomona College and her running career for Pomona-Pitzer with equally exceptional results. Lydens, a senior, has a 3.99 grade-point average while studying philosophy, politics and economics. She was chosen for internships the last two summers at NATO headquarters in Belgium and with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the State Department. As an athlete, she finished third at the NCAA Division 3 cross-country championships last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Mission Viejo woman whose high school studies of the former Soviet Union turned into a fascination with the broken region will get a chance to explore it in depth as a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University. Jennie S. Han, 22, was among three Californians named Sunday as Rhodes scholars for 2000. Han, a senior at Yale University, learned that she received the prestigious international study award Saturday and said she's still stunned that she was among the 32 American students chosen.
SPORTS
April 26, 2008 | Chris Foster, Times Staff Writer
Chris Joseph's career is wandering down a road less traveled by other football players. Several of his former UCLA teammates are wringing their hands this weekend, hoping their names are called during the NFL draft. If not, their quest to land a free-agent contract will begin. But Joseph, a starting offensive lineman for three-plus seasons, is training to make the final cut for an even more exclusive goal -- a Rhodes scholarship.
NEWS
December 16, 1985
Athletes, would-be politicians, scientists and aspiring journalists were among 32 students from 21 colleges nationwide--including two Southern Californians--who have been named recipients of Rhodes Scholarships. They will join an international group from 18 countries chosen to study for two or three years at Oxford University, said David Alexander, American secretary of the Rhodes Scholarship Trust.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2008 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Thirty-two men and women from across the U.S. have won the prestigious Rhodes Scholarships for study at England's Oxford University. Among the Rhodes winners are Florida State University football player safety Myron Rolle, who missed part of Saturday's game against Maryland because he was being interviewed for the scholarship. Rolle is a pre-med student and hopes to become a neurosurgeon. Scott W. Hugo and Christopher D. Joseph, both of UCLA, and Noelle R. Lopez of Santa Clara University were also selected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1985 | From the Associated Press
Athletes, would-be politicians, scientists and aspiring journalists were among 32 students from 21 colleges who were named Sunday as U.S. recipients of Rhodes Scholarships to study in England. The winners will join an international group of students from 18 countries chosen to study for two or three years at Oxford University, said David Alexander, American secretary of the Rhodes Scholarship Trust. Ninety-six finalists were chosen from 1,288 applicants for the prestigious scholarships.
NEWS
May 2, 1989
Jean Sharley Taylor, who as associate editor of The Times directed the paper's features sections for the last 14 years, retired Monday. Taylor came to The Times in 1971 as women's editor and later edited the View section. Named associate editor in 1975, she presided over the creation of a number of sections, including daily Calendar, the Book Review and the Los Angeles Times Magazine. During that period, The Times won three Pulitzer Prizes for arts coverage. In the last two years, Taylor has been the moving force behind the creation of The Times' computerized reading lab and a member of the literacy committee of the American Society of Newspaper Editors.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | Danica Kirka
At the law firm where I was a summer associate, (she now works for a different law firm), on my third day of work, they took us to . . . listen to a presentation by different departments about their work. The man who was making the presentation from the tax department started talking about his work on behalf of Playboy . . . . He said Playboy had called him because they were having a problem with the IRS because the IRS wanted to re-classify some of their staff as employees and not independent contractors . . . . He said: 'Next week this other attorney and I are going to meet with four playmates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999
Two Los Angeles area women were among 32 American students named Sunday as Rhodes scholars for 2000. West Point paratrooper Melissa Sturm of Chatsworth and Jennie S. Han, a Yale University student from Mission Viejo, received the scholarships. Art and Linda Sturm said their daughter has been an overachiever since she began learning how to play a pint-sized violin using the Suzuki Music Program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She has played the violin since age 2 1/2, studied comparative government and earned her wings jumping out of airplanes. Now, 21-year-old Melissa Sturm, a Taft High School graduate and San Fernando Valley native, can add Rhodes scholar to her eclectic--and distinguished--list of accomplishments. The Rhodes scholarship was created in 1902 by the estate of British financier-colonialist Cecil J. Rhodes and is one of the oldest international awards available to American scholars. A senior at the U.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA and ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Mission Viejo woman whose high school studies of the former Soviet Union turned into a fascination with the broken region will get a chance to explore it in depth as a Rhodes scholar at Oxford University. Jennie S. Han, 22, was among three Californians named Sunday as Rhodes scholars for 2000. Han, a senior at Yale University, learned that she received the prestigious international study award Saturday and said she's still stunned that she was among the 32 American students chosen.
NEWS
May 28, 1995
USC offensive lineman Jeremy Hogue is one of the reasons the Trojans appear on most experts' college football preseason Top 10 lists for the 1995 campaign . But even his football prowess pales in comparison to his classroom performance and his community service work. Hogue, who carries a 3.9 grade point average, is an Academic All-American honors candidate and could become USC's first Rhodes Scholar athlete since quarterback Pat Haden.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | from Associated Press
Ben Jones didn't have much time Sunday to celebrate his Rhodes scholarship. After all, scholars have to hit the books. "Unfortunately, I have a big exam tomorrow. You can't get away from the exams," said the 22-year-old Princeton University student, one of 32 Americans who received the prestigious academic award. The mechanical engineering student from Falmouth, Mass., said it was a long road to the prize, which offers winners a chance to study next fall at Oxford University in Britain.
SPORTS
August 24, 1994 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you can remember drinking coffee, popping No-Doz and studying all night for a college economics exam, and then being grateful for getting a C, you'll find USC center Jeremy Hogue a very annoying guy. Hogue's 3.85 grade-point average ranks him No. 2 academically on the Trojan football team. He aspires to be a Rhodes scholar. So here, you figure, is a guy who has absolutely no fun, watches no TV, has no social life and either studies all night or arises at 3 a.m.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1993 | Danica Kirka
At the law firm where I was a summer associate, (she now works for a different law firm), on my third day of work, they took us to . . . listen to a presentation by different departments about their work. The man who was making the presentation from the tax department started talking about his work on behalf of Playboy . . . . He said Playboy had called him because they were having a problem with the IRS because the IRS wanted to re-classify some of their staff as employees and not independent contractors . . . . He said: 'Next week this other attorney and I are going to meet with four playmates.
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