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NEWS
May 14, 1987
Ian Smith, former prime minister of white-ruled Rhodesia, resigned as head of the white opposition party he has led since the country became independent Zimbabwe under black rule in 1980. But Smith, 68, said he will continue to be active in politics. Smith said he is quitting the party leadership because of the government's "vindictive action" over his remarks in South Africa opposing sanctions against Pretoria.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Ian Smith, the last white minority leader of Rhodesia, who vowed that blacks would not rule his country "in a thousand years," died Tuesday in a clinic outside Cape Town, after recently suffering a stroke. He was 88. To many white Rhodesians, Smith was a savior who vowed to preserve white minority rule and protect their interests against rising African nationalist sentiment.
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NEWS
April 4, 1995
Zimbabwe's ruling Zanu-PF Party, led by President Robert Mugabe, is set for another landslide victory in national elections this weekend. Mugabe has ruled the southern African nation virtually unchallenged since the former Rhodesia won independence in 1980. Even before the voting begins, Zanu is assured of victory. Some 53 Zanu candidates for Parliament are running unopposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Donal Lamont, 92, a Roman Catholic bishop expelled from white-ruled Rhodesia in 1977 for opposing its racial policies, died Aug. 14 in Dublin, Ireland, of causes associated with aging. Ordained a priest in 1937, Lamont moved from his native Ireland to Rhodesia in 1946 to establish a Carmelite mission. He was appointed bishop of Umtali in 1957.
NEWS
August 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The farmhouse on the hill, overlooking the greening winter wheat and catching the last rays of orange sunsets, belongs to Geoff Calmeyer, his wife and four young children, and attests to their unshaken confidence in a future for whites in Zimbabwe. The house is still staffed with the same black servants who have been around for years, and the farm's 100 black workers, some third-generation Calmeyer farmhands, still live on the shaded hillside.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | Associated Press
With victory already assured for President Robert Mugabe's party, the main excitement in Saturday's first day of parliamentary elections came when the country's last white ruler was not allowed to vote. Ian D. Smith, 76, who as prime minister of Rhodesia waged an unsuccessful war to keep nationalists like Mugabe from coming to power, was told his name was not on the voters' roll.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Lord Pearce, 89, chairman of a government panel that rejected a proposed settlement in the then-rebel colony of Rhodesia on grounds that most blacks opposed it. Pearce, a former senior judge, visited what now is Zimbabwe as head of the government panel in 1972. His presence was regarded as the first genuine and independent outlet for black majority opinion in many years. In 1965, the white-minority government of Ian Smith had declared itself free of all remaining colonial links with Britain.
NEWS
December 7, 1991
Sir Roy Welensky, 84, prime minister of the British-ruled Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland from 1956 until it collapsed in 1963. Six feet four inches tall and 260 pounds, he was once heavyweight boxing champion of Rhodesia. Welensky was born in what is now Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. He dropped out of school at 15 and joined the railroads at 17, eventually becoming an engineer. He organized a branch of the railway workers union, which became his steppingstone to politics.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sir Humphrey Gibbs, the former governor of Rhodesia who became a weary holdout for the British crown, staying in place in his rambling mansion after the white-minority government declared independence in 1965, has died. His family said Wednesday that he died Thursday at 87 from the complications of influenza. Gibbs, born in London, settled in Rhodesia as a farmer in 1928.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Donal Lamont, 92, a Roman Catholic bishop expelled from white-ruled Rhodesia in 1977 for opposing its racial policies, died Aug. 14 in Dublin, Ireland, of causes associated with aging. Ordained a priest in 1937, Lamont moved from his native Ireland to Rhodesia in 1946 to establish a Carmelite mission. He was appointed bishop of Umtali in 1957.
NEWS
April 9, 1995 | Associated Press
With victory already assured for President Robert Mugabe's party, the main excitement in Saturday's first day of parliamentary elections came when the country's last white ruler was not allowed to vote. Ian D. Smith, 76, who as prime minister of Rhodesia waged an unsuccessful war to keep nationalists like Mugabe from coming to power, was told his name was not on the voters' roll.
NEWS
April 4, 1995
Zimbabwe's ruling Zanu-PF Party, led by President Robert Mugabe, is set for another landslide victory in national elections this weekend. Mugabe has ruled the southern African nation virtually unchallenged since the former Rhodesia won independence in 1980. Even before the voting begins, Zanu is assured of victory. Some 53 Zanu candidates for Parliament are running unopposed.
NEWS
December 7, 1991
Sir Roy Welensky, 84, prime minister of the British-ruled Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland from 1956 until it collapsed in 1963. Six feet four inches tall and 260 pounds, he was once heavyweight boxing champion of Rhodesia. Welensky was born in what is now Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe. He dropped out of school at 15 and joined the railroads at 17, eventually becoming an engineer. He organized a branch of the railway workers union, which became his steppingstone to politics.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Lord Pearce, 89, chairman of a government panel that rejected a proposed settlement in the then-rebel colony of Rhodesia on grounds that most blacks opposed it. Pearce, a former senior judge, visited what now is Zimbabwe as head of the government panel in 1972. His presence was regarded as the first genuine and independent outlet for black majority opinion in many years. In 1965, the white-minority government of Ian Smith had declared itself free of all remaining colonial links with Britain.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sir Humphrey Gibbs, the former governor of Rhodesia who became a weary holdout for the British crown, staying in place in his rambling mansion after the white-minority government declared independence in 1965, has died. His family said Wednesday that he died Thursday at 87 from the complications of influenza. Gibbs, born in London, settled in Rhodesia as a farmer in 1928.
NEWS
August 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The farmhouse on the hill, overlooking the greening winter wheat and catching the last rays of orange sunsets, belongs to Geoff Calmeyer, his wife and four young children, and attests to their unshaken confidence in a future for whites in Zimbabwe. The house is still staffed with the same black servants who have been around for years, and the farm's 100 black workers, some third-generation Calmeyer farmhands, still live on the shaded hillside.
NEWS
March 18, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
An empty strip of land between the middle-class white suburb of Dan Pienaarville and the impoverished black ghetto of Munsieville has become a no-man's-land, perhaps the future front line of the racial civil war that many South Africans fear is coming. In Munsieville are militant black youths who say they are ready to die to bring an end to apartheid, South Africa's system of racial separation and white-minority rule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2007 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Ian Smith, the last white minority leader of Rhodesia, who vowed that blacks would not rule his country "in a thousand years," died Tuesday in a clinic outside Cape Town, after recently suffering a stroke. He was 88. To many white Rhodesians, Smith was a savior who vowed to preserve white minority rule and protect their interests against rising African nationalist sentiment.
NEWS
May 14, 1987
Ian Smith, former prime minister of white-ruled Rhodesia, resigned as head of the white opposition party he has led since the country became independent Zimbabwe under black rule in 1980. But Smith, 68, said he will continue to be active in politics. Smith said he is quitting the party leadership because of the government's "vindictive action" over his remarks in South Africa opposing sanctions against Pretoria.
NEWS
March 18, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
An empty strip of land between the middle-class white suburb of Dan Pienaarville and the impoverished black ghetto of Munsieville has become a no-man's-land, perhaps the future front line of the racial civil war that many South Africans fear is coming. In Munsieville are militant black youths who say they are ready to die to bring an end to apartheid, South Africa's system of racial separation and white-minority rule.
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