Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRhonda Kramer
IN THE NEWS

Rhonda Kramer

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
Rhonda Kramer fast-shuffles a deck of paper slips like a riverboat gambler and flips a switch that puts her on the air on KROQ, diving into the fast-flowing stream of banter between a couple of morning disc jockeys. She joins in the joking and segues quickly into "Well, you'd better watch out for the Hollywood Freeway today. . . ." On the control console is a card to remind her what station she's on. It could be any of seven.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 6, 1988 | T.W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
Rhonda Kramer fast-shuffles a deck of paper slips like a riverboat gambler and flips a switch that puts her on the air on KROQ, diving into the fast-flowing stream of banter between a couple of morning disc jockeys. She joins in the joking and segues quickly into "Well, you'd better watch out for the Hollywood Freeway today. . . ." On the control console is a card to remind her what station she's on. It could be any of seven.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1988 | T. W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
Everyone hates a parade, if it's between them and a vital appointment. Ditto overturned trucks, streets closed by construction, cops-and-robbers shoot-outs, fires, floods and marathon runs. To save drivers from unexpected heartburn over the random events that block surface street traffic, the city of Los Angeles began a program three months ago to monitor the byways for broadcasters, in the same way that freeway obstructions have been reported for years.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | T. W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
Everyone hates a parade, if it's between them and a vital appointment. Ditto overturned trucks, streets closed by construction, cops-and-robbers shoot-outs, fires, floods and marathon runs. To save drivers from unexpected heartburn over the random events that block surface street traffic, the city of Los Angeles began a program three months ago to monitor the byways for broadcasters, in the same way that freeway obstructions have been reported for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1987 | KATE CALLEN, United Press International
The truckloads of oranges, avocados, mayonnaise jars and heads of lettuce that have spilled onto the Southland's freeways over the years seem to blend in Rhonda Kramer's mind. But some memories linger. The overturned cache of Brooke Shields dolls that once snarled Route 91 stands out as the primo Los Angeles freeway tie-up. "It happened sometime around 1980 and 1981, and it was hysterical," said Kramer, co-owner of LA Network, a radio traffic reporting service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1996 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're the polar opposite of undercover cops. Celebrity CHiPs. Gawking fans pester them for autographs. As with movie stars, their presence at public gatherings gets announced. People see them on television and seek their counsel. It's a split-personality life, being one of those California Highway Patrol officers who broadcast radio and TV reports of traffic conditions and other highway news. To their fans, they're broadcast celebrities who rescue commuters from traffic hell.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | MICHELLE MALTAIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As you sit sandwiched between the frantic cellular phone dialer and the driver applying eyeliner, you decide to tune in to a radio traffic report to find out what's put the brakes on your commute. But you hear no mention of the backup you're in. Could it be that the traffic reporters in helicopters above can't see the gridlock? Not likely. From the sky, they can see the roads below for miles, sometimes well enough to read the freeway signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1987 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, Weinstein is a Los Angeles free-lance writer. and
Liz Henderson probably understands the stop-and-go currents of the mammoth Los Angeles freeway system as well as anyone. She rolls up more than 6,000 miles a month in her Dodge Turbo Lancer to meet sales appointments all over the Southland. Evading congestion is vital, so she relies on KNX-AM (1070) traffic guru Bill Keene to warn her of three-car pileups and loose loads of lumber.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1990 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators revealed Monday that a San Diego traffic reporter--and not the pilot--might have been at the controls of a light plane that crashed into a freeway embankment in Solana Beach last month, killing both men and narrowly missing rush-hour traffic.
NEWS
March 16, 1986 | DAVE LARSEN, Times Staff Writer
Not meaning any irreverence, but you'll notice that the book of Genesis doesn't make a reference to any eighth day. That would have brought things back to Monday again, and anybody who has ever been on a freeway in Southern California knows what that means. No, it isn't just your imagination. Driving conditions are morE congested on a MoNday morning. Plus, of course, on Friday afternoons. But, somehow, that doesn't seem to be as nettlesome. Are We There Yet?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1986 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, The roundup of stations was compiled by Dennis McDougal, Daniel Perez, Gregg Barrios, Ray Richmond and Ginger Harmon. and
As the sun starts to set over our city's many interchanges, giving a puce hue to the cloud of nitrous oxide that hangs over us, L.A.'s bone-weary commuters drag themselves into their cars for the long, arduous drive home. It's afternoon drive time--that arbitrary radio time zone between 3 and 6 p.m.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|