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Rhye

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013
With all the Daft Punk hooha about to be unleashed via "Random Access Memories," it's unfortunate that those so obsessed with hot robotic dance music haven't celebrated DJ Koze with as much vigor. Koze, a German beat producer whose funky, minimal electronic dance music seems one Kanye West sample away from busting out, released the often great "Amygdala" in late March. The record is even better than the producer's excellent breakout from 2005, "Kosi Comes Alive. " That record helped heap worldwide attention on the German Kompakt label.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
At one point during a recent day I spent with Eric Church while reporting a feature story on the country singer, Dwight Yoakam's "Honky Tonk Man" came on the radio in the van that was taking us to "Jimmy Kimmel Live. " Church stopped talking to listen to the song, then threw out a bit of Yoakam trivia: The video for " Honky Tonk Man ," he said with obvious respect, was the first country clip shown on MTV. Now Church is putting his admiration into action. The younger star announced Wednesday that he'll team with Yoakam for a North American arena tour this fall, a victory lap of sorts behind Church's album "The Outsiders," which debuted at No. 1 in February with sales of 288,000 copies -- the year's biggest sales week so far. PHOTOS: Concerts by The L.A. Times The trek is scheduled to launch Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
At the cavernous Masonic Hall within the Hollywood Forever Cemetery on Monday night, a secretive sextet of musicians called Rhye gathered before a group of seated, eerily silent worshipers. The hundreds of attendees were barred from photographing the performance of this ritualistic music of romance, and adding another layer of mystery, backlit red stage lights rendered the musicians' features imperceptible, darkened by shadows. A few clusters of well-placed candles flickered. For a group so willfully oblique -- it's done only a handful of performances -- Rhye has received much attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Ed Sheeran might be past his frizzy-haired Brit-folk phase. A year after the young guitar-picker teamed with Elton John for a rather warbly performance of "The A Team" at the 2013 Grammy Awards, Sheeran released a new song Monday, one that trades the cozy acoustic vibe of the earlier tune for a high-gloss pop-funk sound shaped in part by Pharrell Williams. "Sing" is the lead single from an album Sheeran is expected to release this summer, the anticipated follow-up to his hit major-label debut, "+," which came out in the U.K. in 2011 before arriving in U.S. stores the next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Michael Milosh and Robin Hannibal of Rhye are believers in mystery at a moment of enforced accessibility. Last year, the L.A.-based pop-soul duo worked to create an air of uncertainty around its exquisite debut album, “Woman,” on which Milosh sings in a breathy, high-pitched croon that many took to be female; Rhye's infrequent concerts and photo shoots -- and its relatively low profile on social media -- allowed that fantasy to flourish.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been updated. See below for details. A few months back at Sonos Studio in West Hollywood, guitarist Glenn Jones performed solo work in conjunction with a recently completed documentary on the late guitarist John Fahey. Fahey's ability at crafting what he called "American primitive" guitar music resulted in some of the great six-string compositions of the 1960s and '70s. Jones, best known for his Boston instrumental project Cul de Sac, his work with former Can vocalist Damo Suzuki and as the curator of the excellent Fahey box set, "Your Past Comes Back to Haunt You: The Fonotone Years," was stunning at Sonos, and during a pre-performance conversation suggested I keep an eye out for his new record, "My Garden State," put out by the respected Chicago label Thrill Jockey.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
At one point during a recent day I spent with Eric Church while reporting a feature story on the country singer, Dwight Yoakam's "Honky Tonk Man" came on the radio in the van that was taking us to "Jimmy Kimmel Live. " Church stopped talking to listen to the song, then threw out a bit of Yoakam trivia: The video for " Honky Tonk Man ," he said with obvious respect, was the first country clip shown on MTV. Now Church is putting his admiration into action. The younger star announced Wednesday that he'll team with Yoakam for a North American arena tour this fall, a victory lap of sorts behind Church's album "The Outsiders," which debuted at No. 1 in February with sales of 288,000 copies -- the year's biggest sales week so far. PHOTOS: Concerts by The L.A. Times The trek is scheduled to launch Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Ed Sheeran might be past his frizzy-haired Brit-folk phase. A year after the young guitar-picker teamed with Elton John for a rather warbly performance of "The A Team" at the 2013 Grammy Awards, Sheeran released a new song Monday, one that trades the cozy acoustic vibe of the earlier tune for a high-gloss pop-funk sound shaped in part by Pharrell Williams. "Sing" is the lead single from an album Sheeran is expected to release this summer, the anticipated follow-up to his hit major-label debut, "+," which came out in the U.K. in 2011 before arriving in U.S. stores the next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The just-released Queens of the Stone Age animated video for its new song, “Keep Your Eyes Peeled,”  begins with the caption, “A man walks into a bar,” and things turn way bad, way quick. If there's a punch line in the three minutes that follow, it involves blood, fists and violence. But then, the Palm Desert-born Queens of the Stone Age's metallic, barbed rock music has long addressed sour times, with heavy but bouncy notes and pounding, distorted chords, all propelled by a rolling vibe that's smooth and well-lubed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | Randall Roberts, Pop Music Critic
Beyonce, "Beyonce" (Columbia) Though she certainly doesn't need the press, Beyonce's self-titled new album is a daring, and notable, pop album. Through 14 tracks and 17 accompanying music videos, the Houston-raised singer proves that she still rules not just pop but R&B - and that she might be absorbing husband Jay Z's way around a rhymed stanza. At times it's progressive: "Haunted" during a break feels like Madonna's "Ray of Light" sessions, chopped-and-screwed Houston-style.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
This post has been corrected. Please see note at bottom for details. Michael Milosh and Robin Hannibal of Rhye are believers in mystery at a moment of enforced accessibility. Last year, the L.A.-based pop-soul duo worked to create an air of uncertainty around its exquisite debut album, “Woman,” on which Milosh sings in a breathy, high-pitched croon that many took to be female; Rhye's infrequent concerts and photo shoots -- and its relatively low profile on social media -- allowed that fantasy to flourish.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2014 | Randall Roberts, Pop Music Critic
Beyonce, "Beyonce" (Columbia) Though she certainly doesn't need the press, Beyonce's self-titled new album is a daring, and notable, pop album. Through 14 tracks and 17 accompanying music videos, the Houston-raised singer proves that she still rules not just pop but R&B - and that she might be absorbing husband Jay Z's way around a rhymed stanza. At times it's progressive: "Haunted" during a break feels like Madonna's "Ray of Light" sessions, chopped-and-screwed Houston-style.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
The just-released Queens of the Stone Age animated video for its new song, “Keep Your Eyes Peeled,”  begins with the caption, “A man walks into a bar,” and things turn way bad, way quick. If there's a punch line in the three minutes that follow, it involves blood, fists and violence. But then, the Palm Desert-born Queens of the Stone Age's metallic, barbed rock music has long addressed sour times, with heavy but bouncy notes and pounding, distorted chords, all propelled by a rolling vibe that's smooth and well-lubed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This post has been updated. See below for details. A few months back at Sonos Studio in West Hollywood, guitarist Glenn Jones performed solo work in conjunction with a recently completed documentary on the late guitarist John Fahey. Fahey's ability at crafting what he called "American primitive" guitar music resulted in some of the great six-string compositions of the 1960s and '70s. Jones, best known for his Boston instrumental project Cul de Sac, his work with former Can vocalist Damo Suzuki and as the curator of the excellent Fahey box set, "Your Past Comes Back to Haunt You: The Fonotone Years," was stunning at Sonos, and during a pre-performance conversation suggested I keep an eye out for his new record, "My Garden State," put out by the respected Chicago label Thrill Jockey.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013
With all the Daft Punk hooha about to be unleashed via "Random Access Memories," it's unfortunate that those so obsessed with hot robotic dance music haven't celebrated DJ Koze with as much vigor. Koze, a German beat producer whose funky, minimal electronic dance music seems one Kanye West sample away from busting out, released the often great "Amygdala" in late March. The record is even better than the producer's excellent breakout from 2005, "Kosi Comes Alive. " That record helped heap worldwide attention on the German Kompakt label.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
At the cavernous Masonic Hall within the Hollywood Forever Cemetery on Monday night, a secretive sextet of musicians called Rhye gathered before a group of seated, eerily silent worshipers. The hundreds of attendees were barred from photographing the performance of this ritualistic music of romance, and adding another layer of mystery, backlit red stage lights rendered the musicians' features imperceptible, darkened by shadows. A few clusters of well-placed candles flickered. For a group so willfully oblique -- it's done only a handful of performances -- Rhye has received much attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This is the start of a new monthly feature in which Times pop music critic Randall Roberts recommends essential new music and reissues.  William Tyler, Impossible Truth (Merge Records) Tyler is a solo acoustic guitarist whose 2010 album “Behold the Spirit” was a quiet but oft-menacing joy. A self-described “Nashville lifer” whose father, a music biz insider, was once chased down the street by a knife-brandishing David Allan Coe (but then who on Music Row hasn't been?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
AUSTIN, Texas -- At South by Southwest, most musicians don't get the luxury of privacy during soundchecks. Preparing for their set early Thursday afternoon at a Pitchfork showcase, the members of L.A.'s Rhye tuned up their instruments in full view of the several hundred hipsters making their way into a warehouse space east of Interstate 35. And with keyboard, bass, drums, violin, cello, trombone and vocals, the group took its time doing it too; even...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
AUSTIN, Texas -- At South by Southwest, most musicians don't get the luxury of privacy during soundchecks. Preparing for their set early Thursday afternoon at a Pitchfork showcase, the members of L.A.'s Rhye tuned up their instruments in full view of the several hundred hipsters making their way into a warehouse space east of Interstate 35. And with keyboard, bass, drums, violin, cello, trombone and vocals, the group took its time doing it too; even...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
This is the start of a new monthly feature in which Times pop music critic Randall Roberts recommends essential new music and reissues.  William Tyler, Impossible Truth (Merge Records) Tyler is a solo acoustic guitarist whose 2010 album “Behold the Spirit” was a quiet but oft-menacing joy. A self-described “Nashville lifer” whose father, a music biz insider, was once chased down the street by a knife-brandishing David Allan Coe (but then who on Music Row hasn't been?
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