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SPORTS
October 23, 1985
Nobody could say the Galloping Gaels were without rhyme or reason. I remember them coming to Pittsburgh to play Duquesne. One year they featured a hotshot halfback, Presto Podesto from Modesto. The next year they featured another hotshot halfback, Gonzalo Morales from Nogales. I kid you not. GEORGE KISEDA Los Angeles
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NATIONAL
December 15, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
A 17-year-old high school student remained in critical but stable condition Sunday as Colorado officials tried to understand why a fellow student shot her and tried to shoot his debate coach before committing suicide last week. Two days after the shooting at Arapahoe High School in Centennial, the wounded student, Claire Davis, was in a coma at Littleton Adventist Hospital, her family said in a statement released through the hospital's Facebook page Sunday evening. "The first responders got Claire to the right place, at the right time, and the doctors and hospital staff are doing a wonderful job taking care of her," said the statement, which requested privacy.
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NEWS
December 31, 1987
Re "Christmas Rites Require Rousing Ritual of Rhyme," Dec. 23: In Marylou Oates's Christmas list One seasonal thought is carefully missed, A "thank you" from your gossip hawker To Roger Angell of "The Noo Yawker". DIGBY WOLF Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Happy birthday, John Keats. The Romantic poet best known for his odes -- "Ode on a Grecian Urn," "Ode on Indolence," "Ode on Melancholy," "Ode to a Nightingale" and "Ode to Psyche" -- was born 218 years ago today. The great English poet died in 1821 at the age of 25. He was born on Halloween in 1795, more than a century before English children took up the custom of wearing costumes on All Hallows' Eve, though he surely would have enjoyed listening to goblins recite a certain rhyme at their neighbor's doors.
SPORTS
November 9, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
When art professor Melanie Marchant started dating former NBA player Tom Meschery a few years ago, male friends weren't shy about sharing their thoughts on her new man. "They'd pull me aside," she notes, smiling and lowering her voice conspiratorially, "and they would say to me, 'He was the meanest S.O.B. I ever say play.' " You wouldn't know it today. It's not that the 6-foot-6 Meschery, who played most of his 10 NBA seasons in the 1960s, is any less imposing. It's just that he is a thoughtful, compassionate man who looks less like what he may have been years ago and more like what he became after his playing days ended in 1971: owner of a bookstore-tea shop and later, for more than 20 years, a high school and junior college English teacher in Reno and Truckee, Calif.
SPORTS
February 17, 1996
Thanks for selecting my rhyme from the 1946 Times in Steve Springer's story about local pro football teams. My only previous claim to fame is that I played basketball at the same school as Scottie Pippen--50 years earlier. ALDO MOLINARI Long Beach Why can't we just trade the Seahawks to Cleveland for an expansion team to be named later? DAN J. CURTIS West Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
It began as a favor. It became an obsession. It was 1996 and screenwriter Gary Ross got a call from a desperate friend. Out of time and money, director David Koepp was in frantic need of a children's story to complete his movie feature debut, "The Trigger Effect. " Acquiring the rights to a known book was out of the question, so Koepp threw a Hail Mary pass to his friend: Write the beginnings of a story about a boy named Bartholomew Biddle, by tomorrow, for free. "How could I possibly say no?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2004 | Soren Baker
Ludacris "Red Light District" (Def Jam South) *** This ingenious Atlanta rapper is best known for his wit and his exaggerated delivery, but earning respect as a top-tier lyricist seems to be the main goal of his fourth major-label album. On the abbreviated, punch-line-laden "Intro," he fires off one dazzling one-liner after another, and his devilish boasts on the hilarious "Number One Spot" display his distinctive brand of hip-hop humor in song form.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
And so we begin this Christmas morn, with yet some more column corn. If you think there's too much tweaking, you should know a sage is speaking. * 'Tis a yearly thing, recall, so read these words, read them all. And if by reading, your spirits sail, send a check in the U.S. mail. Or buy a gift for Calendar's Bard. Short of cash? Use a credit card. He's not too proud to beg, you see, nor to rhyme most miserably. * If you do rate me with the great Walt, 'tis not my verse that is at fault.
NATIONAL
November 28, 2002 | From Associated Press
A state Supreme Court justice given to writing opinions in rhyme was criticized by two fellow justices who said his style reflected poorly on the court. Seven stanzas from Justice J. Michael Eakin, and complaints about them from Chief Justice Stephen A. Zappala and Justice Ralph Cappy, appeared in a decision Wednesday involving a dispute concerning a prenuptial agreement.
NEWS
September 20, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Whatever your views about the legality of the Obama administration's requirement that employee health plans cover contraception, you have to hope that the Supreme Court will take the case of Sebelius vs. Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. et al. After all, how often do law professors get to refer to a case that rhymes? Poetry aside, the court has every reason to hear the case, in which a federal appeals court in Colorado looked with favor on the argument that Hobby Lobby, a “biblically founded” chain of hobby and craft stores, is protected by the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (or RFRA, as it's known inside the Beltway)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Halfway through his set at the Belmont on night one of the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Queens, N.Y., rapper Action Bronson left the stage and entered the crowd of hundreds scrunched onto the outdoor patio. Bronson, a hulking man with a shaved head and bushy beard, looks more like a dockworker than an emcee, and as he squeezed through the crowd, microphone in hand, he was easy to track by the fans watching from the balcony: Glowing smartphone screens encircled him, shooting photos and taking video.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | Hector Tobar
Dana Gioia spent many years doing battle in that viper's nest of bureaucrats and elected officials called Washington, D.C. This fall the former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts and L.A. native found himself back home. In a series of closed-door meetings, he was often on the receiving end of heated comments from people who can gleefully transform words into weapons. "These are poets," Gioia said. "Poets are temperamental people. " The city of Los Angeles will name its first poet laureate Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
It began as a favor. It became an obsession. It was 1996 and screenwriter Gary Ross got a call from a desperate friend. Out of time and money, director David Koepp was in frantic need of a children's story to complete his movie feature debut, "The Trigger Effect. " Acquiring the rights to a known book was out of the question, so Koepp threw a Hail Mary pass to his friend: Write the beginnings of a story about a boy named Bartholomew Biddle, by tomorrow, for free. "How could I possibly say no?
OPINION
September 2, 2012
The city of Los Angeles will select its first poet laureate this fall. He or she will be tasked with visiting schools, giving readings and crafting verse evocative of the city for special occasions. (A $10,000 annual stipend guarantees an on-call poet.) We could question why the mayor and the City Council, in the midst of a budget crisis, are creating and funding a new government post that is not essential - and we just did - but their decision follows the growing trend of most every state and thousands of cities, large and small, to establish civic poets.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Dashing hat with debonair feather? Check. Footwear made for walking? Check. Alluring Spanish accent? Double check. The cat is back. After supporting roles in three "Shrek" movies, the feisty feline Puss in Boots finally has a film of his own, and those who have cried out for animated justice will be saying "It's about time. " A treat to experience visually (especially in lively 3-D) and verbally, "Puss in Boots" is a family film where the adventure and invention never flag and the tongue-in-cheek humor doesn't linger far behind.
NEWS
March 6, 1986 | JACK SMITH
In pointing out the other day that Los Angeles doesn't rhyme with anything, I noted that New York at least rhymes with pork . That was an observation that revealed my almost complete ignorance of that splendid metropolis. "As a transplanted New Yorker," writes Alan G. Caterson of Palos Verdes, "I must call attention to your very silly mistake. " New York does not rhyme with pork . Never!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2009 | By Ruben Vives
On the fringe of Compton's manufacturing zone lies a row of boarded-up single-family homes that shelter not humans, but a billion-bug-and-worm breeding enterprise. It's nicknamed "Worm City," and Fred Rhyme is its mayor. FOR THE RECORD: Mealworms: An article in the Dec. 13 California section about a Compton worm farm incorrectly attributed a quote to Rosa Gomez. It was Daniel Cervantes, a resident near the farm, who was washing his car when he said, "They've been here all these years before I moved here in 2004."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2011
'Beats, Rhymes and Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest' MPAA rating: R for language Running time: 1 hour, 38 minutes Playing: At the ArcLight, Hollywood
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