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Rhys Ifans

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Moviegoers familiar with Welsh actor Rhys Ifans from his scene-stealing comedic turn as Hugh Grant's slovenly roommate Spike in 1999's "Notting Hill" probably won't recognize him in "Vanity Fair." With his blond shaggy hair cut and dyed dark brown and sporting an upper-class British accent, Ifans cuts a dashing figure as a noble 19th century British soldier.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Anonymous" — starring a sizable swath of Britain's resident acting class — is an ambitiously biting (gnawing?) literary whodunit turning on the Shakespeare question. As in, who really wrote all those seminal plays and sonnets, a long-running scholarly debate that (unlike the actual author) apparently will never die. That might sound like costume drama taken to deadly boring academic extremes. But surprisingly, in director Roland Emmerich's usually effects-heavy hands ("Independence Day," "The Day After Tomorrow" and oh so many more)
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MAGAZINE
March 24, 2002 | JANET REITMAN
Here are a few things you should know about Rhys Ifans: He's Welsh. He describes himself as a "marionette on a bungee." He pronounces his name "Reece," not "Rice." He's totally comfortable hanging around in his underwear. He lives with a fashion designer, which means he can't hang around in his underwear as much as he'd like. He smokes Benson and Hedges, but only the kind sold in Europe, because those seem more unhealthy than the American version.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Based on the compelling life story of international drug trafficker Howard Marks, "Mr. Nice" stars an understated Rhys Ifans as the titular kingpin. Though the film takes a while to cast its spell, writer-director-cinematographer Bernard Rose's close observation of Marks and those around him becomes increasingly involving and allows Rose to comment on the widespread failure of the war on drugs. It would seem that Marks was a born con man. A superlative student, he left behind his small-town Wales childhood to attend Oxford, where he quickly was caught up in the sex-and-drugs culture of the '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Based on the compelling life story of international drug trafficker Howard Marks, "Mr. Nice" stars an understated Rhys Ifans as the titular kingpin. Though the film takes a while to cast its spell, writer-director-cinematographer Bernard Rose's close observation of Marks and those around him becomes increasingly involving and allows Rose to comment on the widespread failure of the war on drugs. It would seem that Marks was a born con man. A superlative student, he left behind his small-town Wales childhood to attend Oxford, where he quickly was caught up in the sex-and-drugs culture of the '60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Anonymous" — starring a sizable swath of Britain's resident acting class — is an ambitiously biting (gnawing?) literary whodunit turning on the Shakespeare question. As in, who really wrote all those seminal plays and sonnets, a long-running scholarly debate that (unlike the actual author) apparently will never die. That might sound like costume drama taken to deadly boring academic extremes. But surprisingly, in director Roland Emmerich's usually effects-heavy hands ("Independence Day," "The Day After Tomorrow" and oh so many more)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002
Russell: Patricia told me to ask you to say, "squirrel." Gondry: Sqrrrrl. Russell: And to say "feral." Gondry: Ffrrrrl. She asked me how to say it in the movie, "feeral" or "feral," and I said it my way, "ffrrrrl," which she laughed at for the rest of the movie. Russell: Patricia is a delight to work with. Did you feel comfortable directing her naked for so much of the film? Gondry: I was shy as well, but I think I was honest with her.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2004
Real time: "ER" is taking a note from "24" by doing a real-time episode. The show, to air Nov. 11, will follow every moment of guest star Ray Liotta's hospital visit. Movie delay: "Enduring Love," a drama starring Rhys Ifans and Daniel Craig that was to have premiered in L.A. Sept. 17, has been pushed back to Oct. 29. Concert scrapped: John Hiatt's concert Sunday at the Vault 350 in Long Beach has been canceled. Refunds are available at point of purchase.
NEWS
June 20, 2002 | Kenneth Turan
* New this Week: They haven't renamed "The Shipping News" as "How Quoyle Got His Groove Back," but that's pretty much what they've turned E. Annie Proulx's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel into. With Kevin Spacey miscast as the oafish Quoyle, this is the latest installment in director Lasse Hallstrom's ("Cider House Rules," "Chocolat") apparently endless series of unconvincingly life-affirming productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2008 | Jenny Sundel
BEST ACTRESS nominee 1. Sienna Miller had date Rhys Ifans -- and his coat -- to keep her warm at Film Independent's Spirit Awards Feb. 23, while winner 2. Ellen Page, with "Juno" costar J.K. Simmons, came prepared in her own suit jacket. But less-dressed attendees, including presenter Kate Beckinsale, shivered at the Santa Monica beachside ceremony, where umbrella-wielding escorts magically appeared to transport indie filmmakers from the blue carpet to a huge white tent as rain started to fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Moviegoers familiar with Welsh actor Rhys Ifans from his scene-stealing comedic turn as Hugh Grant's slovenly roommate Spike in 1999's "Notting Hill" probably won't recognize him in "Vanity Fair." With his blond shaggy hair cut and dyed dark brown and sporting an upper-class British accent, Ifans cuts a dashing figure as a noble 19th century British soldier.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2002
Russell: Patricia told me to ask you to say, "squirrel." Gondry: Sqrrrrl. Russell: And to say "feral." Gondry: Ffrrrrl. She asked me how to say it in the movie, "feeral" or "feral," and I said it my way, "ffrrrrl," which she laughed at for the rest of the movie. Russell: Patricia is a delight to work with. Did you feel comfortable directing her naked for so much of the film? Gondry: I was shy as well, but I think I was honest with her.
MAGAZINE
March 24, 2002 | JANET REITMAN
Here are a few things you should know about Rhys Ifans: He's Welsh. He describes himself as a "marionette on a bungee." He pronounces his name "Reece," not "Rice." He's totally comfortable hanging around in his underwear. He lives with a fashion designer, which means he can't hang around in his underwear as much as he'd like. He smokes Benson and Hedges, but only the kind sold in Europe, because those seem more unhealthy than the American version.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2009
Your list of the best football movies ever made featured a lot of classics ("First and 10," Feb. 1), but you left off the greatest of them all: Michael Ritchie's 1977 comedy "Semi-Tough". This charming triangle about two football players (Burt Reynolds and Kris Kristofferson) and the woman they love (Jill Clayburgh) is filled with fascinating insider details about the game, and it combines romantic comedy and sports action in a manner that wouldn't be topped until Ron Shelton made "Bull Durham" 11 years later.
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