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Rhythm

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2012 | Hector Tobar
What is the rhythm of Los Angeles? Before hearing poet Wanda Coleman speak at the Los Angeles Central Library recently, it had never occurred to me to think that L.A. has a rhythm. Coleman is an L.A. native whose poems have taken her around the world as an ambassador of Angeleno attitude. She shared the stage at the library's "ALOUD" lecture series with another great L.A. poet, Lewis MacAdams. When you leave L.A. and come back, Coleman told us, you feel the unique way time and people move here.
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SPORTS
April 12, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
Jamal Crawford missed five of his first six shots Saturday, a clear sign the Clippers reserve shooting guard was out of rhythm after sitting out the last five games recovering from a strained left calf. But Crawford made his next two shots, a clear sign he is confident enough to take shots when the result hangs in the balance, even if he's still trying to find his way after being out for so long. "I think in the second half, I got more comfortable," Crawford said after scoring 10 points on three-for-eight shooting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The Sunset Concerts at the Skirball Center continued to move into dance party mode Thursday night with the performance by Mali's Vieux Farka Touré. Extending the growing emphasis on body-moving, rhythmic-oriented modes established in previous weeks by Hugh Masekela, TribalJazz and Zohar, Touré played a set unabashedly oriented toward the participants in the expanding dance pit at the front of the stage. Nothing wrong with dancing, of course.
SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Don Mattingly didn't have to come to the ballpark Monday, so the Dodgers manager said he got his hair cut, inflated the tires on his bicycle and, basically, took the evening off. "A lot of nothing," he said with a smile. "It was productive. " That remains to be seen. Because for players accustomed to playing every day over a six-month schedule, the start to the Dodgers' season has been a whole lot of nothing. BOX SCORE: Dodgers 3, Tigers 2 (10) Monday's off day was the third in eight days for the Dodgers, who get two more days off over the next week.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2009 | Reed Johnson
As Grace Jones tells the story, a certain pop-singer friend once asked how she managed to get out from under her strict, religious Jamaican American family years ago, setting herself on the path to becoming a singer, actor and fashion fetish-object. "You know, Michael," Jones told Michael Jackson, "I just did it." And how. To paraphrase the title of one of her albums, Jones, now 61, has always been determined to keep living her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1991
Growing up on the streets doesn't give you rhythm, Ice. If you had grown up there maybe you'd know that. JILL JOHNSON Fullerton
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1999
According to reader Robert T. Leet, "rap 'music' is literally not music--no melody or harmony, no notes. It is rhythmic, rhyming talk . . ." (Letters, Jan. 10). Poppycock! I looked up "music" in my dictionary: "vocal or instrumental sounds having rhythm, melody or harmony." That's or, not and. A composition need not have all three components; any one is sufficient. Rap has little, if any, melody or harmony, but it most indisputably has rhythm, and therefore meets the definition.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Vice President Dick Cheney was treated "without complication" for an abnormal heartbeat, his office said, making a short visit to a hospital to restore his normal rhythm with an electric shock. It was the second time in less than a year that Cheney, 67, has been treated for an atrial fibrillation, an abnormal rhythm involving the upper chambers of the heart. He has had four heart attacks, the first at age 37. An estimated 2.8 million Americans have atrial fibrillation, the most common type of irregular heartbeat and one that is not life-threatening in itself.
SPORTS
September 21, 1991
Vince Compagnone must be congratulated on his recent photo shot (Sept. 5) of a Cubs-Padre play. The picture shows (in freeze form) that games are filled with rhythm, dance and drama. And music can be added with viewer imagination. EDWIN L. SECARD Vista
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
By definition, electronic dance music's focus is on the primal pleasures of the body. Its main thrust, so to speak, is to prompt physicality through rhythm. And then there's Ricardo Villalobos, one of the most innovative producers making beats today. His new album, “Dependent and Happy,” focuses as much on communion with the head as with the booty. Born in Chile, he and his family relocated to Germany, where he connected with Berlin's fertile minimalist techno movement. Since his first releases in the mid-'90s, Villalobos has crafted vast, long pieces whose repetition as much suggests modern composers like Steve Reich, La Monte Young and Philip Glass as they do beat music.
SPORTS
April 4, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
This was precisely why J.J. Redick wanted to come back when he did. So what if the Clippers shooting guard unfurled a clunker against the Dallas Mavericks in a game that will be forgotten by next week? Better than doing it in a playoff game, when an off performance could lead to an early off-season for a team with championship aspirations. That was the lesson Redick learned three years ago, when he sat out the final 17 games of the regular season for the Orlando Magic because of an abdominal injury and then came back for the first round of the playoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Toni Braxton and Kenny Edmonds have history together as soul-music hit makers, which in the record industry is usually reason enough to rejoin forces. In the 1990s he wrote and produced large chunks of her first two albums, both blockbusters with combined sales of more than 16 million copies; the discs spawned five top 10 singles, including "You're Makin' Me High" and "Breathe Again," and earned three Grammy Awards for female R&B vocal performance. So although their careers later diverged - Braxton took up with other collaborators and began acting, while Edmonds (known as Babyface)
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
Friday night's game was all about Clippers All-Star power forward Blake Griffin dominating the Toronto Raptors, when he wasn't getting in foul trouble. But this game was also about DeAndre Jordan staying the course when he was intentionally fouled by the Raptors and it was about Willie Green providing the Clippers with a spark when it was needed. Griffin, who played just 28 minutes and 19 seconds because of foul problems, had 36 points on 13-for-18 shooting and eight rebounds to help the Clippers to a 118-105 victory over the Raptors at Staples Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2013 | David Colker
Congolese superstar musician and songwriter Tabu Ley Rochereau, whose electrifying performances fused African and Latin rhythms into an irresistible blend, was greatly responsible in the 1970s for bringing Afro-pop to Europe and other parts of the world. And even when his roller coaster career was hitting one of its low periods - as it was in the mid-1990s when he lived in Anaheim and held court at a local Norm's restaurant - Rochereau managed to put on a tightly choreographed show complete with band, dancers and masters of ceremonies, all fronted by his honey-toned vocals.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Together, Joan Mitchell and Jasper Johns would seem to be an unlikely pair of inspirations for a new body of paintings, but there they are hovering in the background of 10 lovely recent works by Mark Dutcher. Two kinds of nominal handwriting -- gestural abstraction and a recognizable vocabulary of painted signs -- slip and slide across the surfaces of his canvases, as if perpetually merging and fading away. Most of Dutcher's paintings at Coagula Curatorial are of a size (4 ½ feet tall)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
It looks like Rhythm & Hues is still downsizing.  The El Segundo visual effects company, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in February , is auctioning off assets, including computers, furniture and film equipment.  Bidding will conclude July 24 at 10:30 a.m., said Tiger Group, the company conducting the auction. Rhythm & Hues is selling hundreds of items that it no longer needs for its operations. ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll For example, more than 150 computers are going on the auction block, along with more than 300  Herman Miller Aeron chairs.  Film equipment for sale includes a 2006 Film Light Northlight scanner, an Arri Arrilaser film recorder and two animation cameras.  Founded in 1987, Rhythm & Hues created effects for movies including “The Golden Compass,” “Babe,” “Django Unchained,” “Snow White and the Huntsman” and “Life of Pi,” for which it won an Oscar.
SPORTS
October 19, 2009
Key: Drew Brees passed for 369 yards and four touchdowns against the league's No. 1 defense. Brees had not thrown a TD the previous two weeks. He passed 100 for his career. Saints said: "Seven different guys scored touchdowns. That's big. That's the type of rhythm that, when you get in, you feel like you can call anything and it's going to work." -- Brees Giants said: "It's not the way I imagined it during the week, but you're going to encounter all sorts of games and all sorts of situations."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013
At first glance, a rhythm section-free duo outing between a piano and saxophone could be considered a challenging assignment for some jazz listeners. Not so with Kneebody saxophonist Ben Wendel and pianist Dan Tepfer, who has been tapped as a rising star after collaborations with Lee Konitz and an inspired album-long take on Bach's "Goldberg Variations. " Based on a show last year at this same venue, plenty of sparks will fly when these two forces meet, as heard on a new recording, "Small Constructions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | Don Heckman
Ed Shaughnessy, whose mutton-chop whiskers and swinging rhythms made him one of the most famous drummers in jazz during his nearly three decades with Doc Severinsen's "Tonight Show" band, has died. He was 84. Shaughnessy had a heart attack Friday at his Calabasas home, said William Selditz, a close family friend. While his nightly gig on "The Tonight Show" brought him the kind of drumming fame previously bestowed on giants such as Gene Krupa, Shaughnessy also delved into more far-reaching musical realms.
SPORTS
May 12, 2013 | By David Wharton
There was a good deal of playoff chatter around the Kings training facility Sunday morning. After an abbreviated skate, with the team still waiting to hear about its second-round matchup, players imagined the excitement of a freeway series against the Ducks. They talked about facing a familiar - and tough - opponent in the San Jose Sharks. Dwight King had no preference either way. He was just hoping for a happy ending. "In the playoffs, you have more eyes on you," he said.
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