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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Mickey Baker, an exceptional 1950s session guitarist who played on hundreds of recordings, helping to transform rhythm and blues into rock 'n' roll, died Tuesday at his home near Toulouse, France, according to French media reports. He was 87. A cause of death was not disclosed. Baker "was the first great rock and roll guitarist," rock historian Dave Marsh wrote in 1989 in "The Heart of Rock and Roll: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made. " The sassy "Love Is Strange" was one of them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Toni Braxton and Kenny Edmonds have history together as soul-music hit makers, which in the record industry is usually reason enough to rejoin forces. In the 1990s he wrote and produced large chunks of her first two albums, both blockbusters with combined sales of more than 16 million copies; the discs spawned five top 10 singles, including "You're Makin' Me High" and "Breathe Again," and earned three Grammy Awards for female R&B vocal performance. So although their careers later diverged - Braxton took up with other collaborators and began acting, while Edmonds (known as Babyface)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screamin' Jay Hawkins, a legendary rhythm and blues singer with an outrageous theatrical bent that led him to pop out of a coffin onstage, died Saturday in a hospital near Paris. He was 70. Hawkins died after emergency surgery to treat an aneurysm, local media reported. Born Jalacy J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Mickey Baker, an exceptional 1950s session guitarist who played on hundreds of recordings, helping to transform rhythm and blues into rock 'n' roll, died Tuesday at his home near Toulouse, France, according to French media reports. He was 87. A cause of death was not disclosed. Baker "was the first great rock and roll guitarist," rock historian Dave Marsh wrote in 1989 in "The Heart of Rock and Roll: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made. " The sassy "Love Is Strange" was one of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2007 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
Phillip Vint wants to be a Blue Man. That's why the stocky, 29-year-old drummer for a local funk-reggae band made sure he was at the front of the line last week for open auditions to become the newest member of Blue Man Group. "The first time I saw the show, I said, 'I have to do that,' " he said. "I'd go anywhere they wanted me to. I'd move to, like, Bakersfield." Most striving actors come to an audition with at least a small hope of eventually being recognized on the streets or at a nightclub.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
Toni Braxton and Kenny Edmonds have history together as soul-music hit makers, which in the record industry is usually reason enough to rejoin forces. In the 1990s he wrote and produced large chunks of her first two albums, both blockbusters with combined sales of more than 16 million copies; the discs spawned five top 10 singles, including "You're Makin' Me High" and "Breathe Again," and earned three Grammy Awards for female R&B vocal performance. So although their careers later diverged - Braxton took up with other collaborators and began acting, while Edmonds (known as Babyface)
BUSINESS
June 4, 1993
Hollywood Records named Jesus Garber as vice president of urban promotion. Garber, who will be based in Burbank, will oversee the promotion of rap and rhythm and blues artists for Hollywood Records and Boston International Records. Garber previously was vice president of R&B promotions at Zoo Entertainment, where he worked with artist Phyllis Hyman. Film Marc Shmuger is Columbia Pictures' new executive vice president of marketing and creative director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Theola Kilgore, 79, a 1960s R & B singer who was best-known for her recordings of two Ed Townsend songs, "The Love of My Man" and "This Is My Prayer," died Sunday at a Los Angeles rehabilitation facility. A native of Oakland, Kilgore began singing in church and was a gospel singer when she met J.W. Alexander, Sam Cooke's manager. He introduced her to songwriter/producer Townsend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2006 | Ann Powers and Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writers
Ruth Brown, the pioneering singer whose 1950s hits including "Teardrops From My Eyes" and "(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean" helped establish both the rhythm-and-blues form and Atlantic Records as the genre's preeminent label, died Friday in a Las Vegas area hospital from complications after a heart attack and stroke earlier in the week. She was 78. The Grammy- and Tony Award-winning Brown had suffered a variety of ailments in recent years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1988 | SHERA GROSS, Associated Press
Nearly 25 years after he hit the British pop music scene as a teen-age vocalist, Steve Winwood is recapturing the popularity of his youth with the help of Nashville and Memphis session men. The Grammy award-winning artist's new album and hit single of the same name, "Roll With It," hark back to his days in the mid-1960s with the rhythm and blues-styled Spencer Davis Group. The move to Tennessee, he says, gave him the chance to go back to his musical roots on the new album.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2011 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
Etta James, the legendary rhythm and blues singer suffering from end-stage leukemia and dementia, is under sedation while being treated at a Riverside hospital, her son said Saturday. The 73-year-old performer, known for hits such as "At Last" and "Tell Mama," will remain hospitalized for at least several days before possibly returning to her Riverside home, Donto James said. If doctors can wean her from her sedation by Sunday, her family will try to hold a small Christmas celebration in her hospital room, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Fayrene "Faye" Treadwell, the former manager of the Drifters who won a longtime legal battle to stop promoters from infringing on the classic rhythm-and-blues vocal group's trademark name, has died. She was 84. Treadwell, one of the first female African American entertainment managers, died of complications of breast cancer May 22 at her home in Burbank, said her daughter, Tina Treadwell. The Arkansas-born Treadwell was the widow of George Treadwell, a veteran music manager whose clients included Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington, Billie Holiday and Sammy Davis Jr. He also was the original manager of the Drifters, which was formed in 1953 and recorded the hits "This Magic Moment," "Up on the Roof" and "Under the Boardwalk.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2007 | August Brown, Times Staff Writer
Phillip Vint wants to be a Blue Man. That's why the stocky, 29-year-old drummer for a local funk-reggae band made sure he was at the front of the line last week for open auditions to become the newest member of Blue Man Group. "The first time I saw the show, I said, 'I have to do that,' " he said. "I'd go anywhere they wanted me to. I'd move to, like, Bakersfield." Most striving actors come to an audition with at least a small hope of eventually being recognized on the streets or at a nightclub.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2006 | Ann Powers and Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writers
Ruth Brown, the pioneering singer whose 1950s hits including "Teardrops From My Eyes" and "(Mama) He Treats Your Daughter Mean" helped establish both the rhythm-and-blues form and Atlantic Records as the genre's preeminent label, died Friday in a Las Vegas area hospital from complications after a heart attack and stroke earlier in the week. She was 78. The Grammy- and Tony Award-winning Brown had suffered a variety of ailments in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Theola Kilgore, 79, a 1960s R & B singer who was best-known for her recordings of two Ed Townsend songs, "The Love of My Man" and "This Is My Prayer," died Sunday at a Los Angeles rehabilitation facility. A native of Oakland, Kilgore began singing in church and was a gospel singer when she met J.W. Alexander, Sam Cooke's manager. He introduced her to songwriter/producer Townsend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screamin' Jay Hawkins, a legendary rhythm and blues singer with an outrageous theatrical bent that led him to pop out of a coffin onstage, died Saturday in a hospital near Paris. He was 70. Hawkins died after emergency surgery to treat an aneurysm, local media reported. Born Jalacy J.
NEWS
March 12, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LaVern Baker, the rhythm and blues singer best known for her gold record 1950s hits "Tweedle-Dee" and "Jim Dandy," has died. She was 67. Baker, who in 1991 became only the second woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, died Monday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. A diabetic, she had suffered strokes and two years ago had both legs amputated below the knees. Among her other hits were "I Cried a Tear," "Shake a Hand," "Saved" and "See See Rider."
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Deadheads can generally dance better, longer and with greater frequency than anyone who would hang around with "Night of the Living Dead" director George Romero. In addition to the Grateful Dead themselves, there's a lot of bands that do the Dead thing--Phish, Blues Traveler, the Samples, the Spin Doctors and Widespread Panic.
NEWS
March 12, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LaVern Baker, the rhythm and blues singer best known for her gold record 1950s hits "Tweedle-Dee" and "Jim Dandy," has died. She was 67. Baker, who in 1991 became only the second woman inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, died Monday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City. A diabetic, she had suffered strokes and two years ago had both legs amputated below the knees. Among her other hits were "I Cried a Tear," "Shake a Hand," "Saved" and "See See Rider."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1995 | RICHARD HARRINGTON, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Washington-based Rhythm and Blues Foundation recently announced the recipients of the sixth annual Pioneer Awards, which recognize outstanding contributors to the genre. But for all the hoopla surrounding the awards (which will be presented tonight in Los Angeles at the Hollywood Palladium), the R&B royalty reform movement that gave rise to the foundation seems to have hit a lull in the past two years.
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