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October 4, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, Greg Braxton is a Times staff writer
Bobby Soul was more than just another hyperkinetic, jive-talkin' disc jockey to Veronica Washington. He was the great "black" hope who could save her struggling African-American radio station. Washington, the fictional owner of the fictional WBLZ in Detroit that is the setting for the new NBC situation comedy "Rhythm & Blues," believed Soul, who had a huge following of black listeners at another station, was the key to boosting WBLZ's floundering ratings.
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February 11, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The creator of NBC's "Rhythm & Blues" has put the show's soul on ice. Executive producer Jordan Moffet said he felt shocked and stung last fall by critics and viewers who found the first-year series' premise--a white disc jockey hired to save a struggling African-American radio station--racist and insulting. His woes increased when NBC yanked the comedy from its schedule last October due to poor ratings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The creator of NBC's "Rhythm & Blues" has put the show's soul on ice. Executive producer Jordan Moffet said he felt shocked and stung last fall by critics and viewers who found the first-year series' premise--a white disc jockey hired to save a struggling African-American radio station--racist and insulting. His woes increased when NBC yanked the comedy from its schedule last October due to poor ratings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | GREG BRAXTON, Greg Braxton is a Times staff writer
Bobby Soul was more than just another hyperkinetic, jive-talkin' disc jockey to Veronica Washington. He was the great "black" hope who could save her struggling African-American radio station. Washington, the fictional owner of the fictional WBLZ in Detroit that is the setting for the new NBC situation comedy "Rhythm & Blues," believed Soul, who had a huge following of black listeners at another station, was the key to boosting WBLZ's floundering ratings.
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