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Rhythm Method

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SCIENCE
June 2, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Today's teenagers are increasingly likely to use the rhythm method to prevent pregnancy and to have relaxed attitudes about unwed motherhood, according to a new government sex survey. The results, released Wednesday by the National Center for Health Statistics, found that 17% of 15- to 19-year-olds used periodic abstinence, or the calendar rhythm method, as a form of contraception in the period from 2006 to 2008. In 2002, 11% of teens used that method. "That was pretty much a surprise," said Joyce Abma, lead author of the study and a demographer with the center.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Leave it to the brilliant Malcolm Potts to explain why the Little Sisters of the Poor, the Colorado nuns who recently won an interim U.S. Supreme Court victory , are hurting themselves, not just their female employees, by claiming that they should be exempt from offering contraceptive coverage with their healthcare benefits. Potts, a UC Berkeley public health professor who is an obstetrician and embryologist, is a celebrity in international reproductive health circles. For decades he has pioneered advances in women's reproductive health, particularly in the developing world.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993
Today's article on the new papal document Veritatis Splendor states that "the church approves only the rhythm method of birth control . . . " (July 10). The rhythm method has not been taught in the Catholic Church for decades. I suggest your writers educate themselves on the methods used throughout the world during this time: the ovulation and symptothermal methods. The rhythm method was unreliable because it relied on the woman having regular menstruations, whereas modern methods are effective and do not require any regularity on the part of the woman.
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | By Malcolm Potts
Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that a group of Colorado nuns will not be required to offer contraceptive coverage to employees while pursuing its legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act. The nuns' action highlights the misunderstandings and theological errors behind the Vatican's condemnation of what it terms "artificial contraception. " And it also overlooks an important medical point: The nuns might have something to gain from taking oral contraceptives. But first, some background on the history of contraception.
NEWS
August 12, 1985 | From Reuters
Pope John Paul II today told Africans, often seen as tragically plagued by overpopulation, that they should ignore Western ideas of limiting families through contraception and abortion. He said the church recognizes the problems of population growth faced by some African countries and referred to the rhythm method of birth control. The Pope praised the high value Africans place on having children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Leave it to the brilliant Malcolm Potts to explain why the Little Sisters of the Poor, the Colorado nuns who recently won an interim U.S. Supreme Court victory , are hurting themselves, not just their female employees, by claiming that they should be exempt from offering contraceptive coverage with their healthcare benefits. Potts, a UC Berkeley public health professor who is an obstetrician and embryologist, is a celebrity in international reproductive health circles. For decades he has pioneered advances in women's reproductive health, particularly in the developing world.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | From Reuters
Pope John Paul II today denounced Western efforts to impose "contraceptive imperialism" on the Third World and reiterated his opposition to artificial birth control and abortion. "When birth control appears necessary as a matter of conscience, couples are invited to act with self-control according to methods which respect nature," he told more than 100,000 people at an open air Mass at Fianarantsoa in the southern highlands of Madagascar. "The Church's teaching seems difficult, but the experience of many couples shows that it can be followed," the Pope said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1985
Along with thousands of other women, I have used Natural Family Planning safely for years. It does require some sexual abstinence each month, but I prefer that to the health risks associated with the Pill and IUD. The "careful monitoring of cervical secretions" is not complicated at all, but becomes a part of body awareness to the woman. Zero Population Growth's patronizing attitude toward women of the Third World is an insult to women's intelligence. Planned Parenthood and its ilk have refused for years to provide comprehensive information about Natural Family Planning, which requires no purchase of pills or equipment and whose success is documented.
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | By Malcolm Potts
Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that a group of Colorado nuns will not be required to offer contraceptive coverage to employees while pursuing its legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act. The nuns' action highlights the misunderstandings and theological errors behind the Vatican's condemnation of what it terms "artificial contraception. " And it also overlooks an important medical point: The nuns might have something to gain from taking oral contraceptives. But first, some background on the history of contraception.
SCIENCE
May 4, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
It was supposed to make every child a wanted child, give women control over their bodies and grant couples worry-free sex. Such were the aspirations of health professionals worldwide when the medication now known simply as "the pill" arrived on the market 50 years ago. It was the first birth-control method that did not require use in the heat of the moment, the first that could be used by a woman without her partner's knowledge or cooperation....
SCIENCE
June 2, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Today's teenagers are increasingly likely to use the rhythm method to prevent pregnancy and to have relaxed attitudes about unwed motherhood, according to a new government sex survey. The results, released Wednesday by the National Center for Health Statistics, found that 17% of 15- to 19-year-olds used periodic abstinence, or the calendar rhythm method, as a form of contraception in the period from 2006 to 2008. In 2002, 11% of teens used that method. "That was pretty much a surprise," said Joyce Abma, lead author of the study and a demographer with the center.
SCIENCE
May 4, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
It was supposed to make every child a wanted child, give women control over their bodies and grant couples worry-free sex. Such were the aspirations of health professionals worldwide when the medication now known simply as "the pill" arrived on the market 50 years ago. It was the first birth-control method that did not require use in the heat of the moment, the first that could be used by a woman without her partner's knowledge or cooperation....
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2002 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Carlos Santana may have hit his career peak 30 years in with 1999's "Supernatural," but deep down he'll always be a child of the '60s. He said as much not long into a wildly celebratory performance Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl, as he embarked on the follow to his last album, which racked up nine Grammys and has sold more than 11 million copies in the U.S. alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993
Today's article on the new papal document Veritatis Splendor states that "the church approves only the rhythm method of birth control . . . " (July 10). The rhythm method has not been taught in the Catholic Church for decades. I suggest your writers educate themselves on the methods used throughout the world during this time: the ovulation and symptothermal methods. The rhythm method was unreliable because it relied on the woman having regular menstruations, whereas modern methods are effective and do not require any regularity on the part of the woman.
NEWS
May 1, 1989 | From Reuters
Pope John Paul II today denounced Western efforts to impose "contraceptive imperialism" on the Third World and reiterated his opposition to artificial birth control and abortion. "When birth control appears necessary as a matter of conscience, couples are invited to act with self-control according to methods which respect nature," he told more than 100,000 people at an open air Mass at Fianarantsoa in the southern highlands of Madagascar. "The Church's teaching seems difficult, but the experience of many couples shows that it can be followed," the Pope said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1985
Along with thousands of other women, I have used Natural Family Planning safely for years. It does require some sexual abstinence each month, but I prefer that to the health risks associated with the Pill and IUD. The "careful monitoring of cervical secretions" is not complicated at all, but becomes a part of body awareness to the woman. Zero Population Growth's patronizing attitude toward women of the Third World is an insult to women's intelligence. Planned Parenthood and its ilk have refused for years to provide comprehensive information about Natural Family Planning, which requires no purchase of pills or equipment and whose success is documented.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2002 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
Carlos Santana may have hit his career peak 30 years in with 1999's "Supernatural," but deep down he'll always be a child of the '60s. He said as much not long into a wildly celebratory performance Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl, as he embarked on the follow to his last album, which racked up nine Grammys and has sold more than 11 million copies in the U.S. alone.
NEWS
August 12, 1985 | From Reuters
Pope John Paul II today told Africans, often seen as tragically plagued by overpopulation, that they should ignore Western ideas of limiting families through contraception and abortion. He said the church recognizes the problems of population growth faced by some African countries and referred to the rhythm method of birth control. The Pope praised the high value Africans place on having children.
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