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September 11, 1988 | RIA STALMAN, Ria Stalman was the gold medalist in the women's discus in 1984. Next month she will be inducted into Arizona State's Athletic Hall of Fame. Stalman lives in Amsterdam, where she is a journalist.
Images. That's what I get when I think back to Los Angeles and my participation (in the 1984 Olympics). I would have to dig deeply, to tell you about my experiences there. And even then, there are holes in my memory, caused by moments where I was physically there, but my mind was turned off. No, I wasn't spacey. On the contrary. I had both feet of my 215-pound body firmly on the ground. No, it was because I had to be a winner. If there was any favorite to win the gold medal it was me.
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September 11, 1988 | RIA STALMAN, Ria Stalman was the gold medalist in the women's discus in 1984. Next month she will be inducted into Arizona State's Athletic Hall of Fame. Stalman lives in Amsterdam, where she is a journalist.
Images. That's what I get when I think back to Los Angeles and my participation (in the 1984 Olympics). I would have to dig deeply, to tell you about my experiences there. And even then, there are holes in my memory, caused by moments where I was physically there, but my mind was turned off. No, I wasn't spacey. On the contrary. I had both feet of my 215-pound body firmly on the ground. No, it was because I had to be a winner. If there was any favorite to win the gold medal it was me.
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SPORTS
July 10, 1987 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
It has always been Natalie Kaaiawahia's particular and extraordinary talent to send objects of varying shapes and sizes hurtling away from herself, rapidly and with great force. For a time, she focused her energies on the shotput and the discus--events she was so good at as a teen-ager that Art Venegas, the throwing coach at UCLA, still remembers her as "one of the all-time greats in the world for her age." These days, it is mostly softballs that Kaaiawahia, 22, throws.
SPORTS
July 9, 1987 | ROBYN NORWOOD, Times Staff Writer
It has always been Natalie Kaaiawahia's particular and extraordinary talent that she is able to send objects of varying shapes and sizes hurling away from herself, rapidly and with great force. For a time, she focused her energies on the shotput and the discus--events she was so good at as a teen-ager that Art Venegas, the throwing coach at UCLA, still remembers her as "one of the all-time greats in the world for her age." These days, it is mostly softballs that Kaaiawahia, 22, throws.
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