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Riane Eisler

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NEWS
August 21, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
It is an idyllic place where Riane Eisler lives with her husband, David Loye--a graceful old house hidden away in a garden, its rooms nevertheless filled with light. Pale Chinese carpets line the floors, ethnic art objects are on the walls and shelves, quiet prevails. Scattered throughout are original and copied figurines that bear witness to the worship of the goddess in various prehistoric societies.
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NEWS
August 10, 1995 | FRANCIS HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Riane Eisler, whose groundbreaking bestseller "The Chalice and the Blade" was critically acclaimed by readers as diverse as Princeton anthropologist Ashley Montagu and fiction author Isabel Allende, will be in the area this week. Eisler has a new book out, "Sacred Pleasure," which offers a critical examination of the shifting balance of power between men and women.
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NEWS
August 10, 1995 | FRANCIS HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Riane Eisler, whose groundbreaking bestseller "The Chalice and the Blade" was critically acclaimed by readers as diverse as Princeton anthropologist Ashley Montagu and fiction author Isabel Allende, will be in the area this week. Eisler has a new book out, "Sacred Pleasure," which offers a critical examination of the shifting balance of power between men and women.
NEWS
September 10, 1989
Riane Eisler ("Goddesses and Goodness," by Kathleen Hendrix, Aug. 21) has just discovered what feminist theologians began to write about in 1960 with Valerie Saiving's article, "The Human Situation: A Feminine View." More and more women who feel disconnected, invalidated, and unfulfilled after many years of marriage and children are turning at age 50 to seminaries to find the answers. Last year San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo had more women than men enrolled. Women are becoming increasingly dissatisfied with the pap they are spoon-fed in Sunday schools.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 1989
All the latest hoopla over goddesses (Gimbutas, Riane Eisler) and mythology (Joseph Campbell) has produced a deluge of articles. I've yet to see in any of them so much as a mention of the late poet and scholar Robert Graves, whose name used to be synonymous with both. A. REED Los Angeles
NEWS
September 10, 1989
Riane Eisler ("Goddesses and Goodness," by Kathleen Hendrix, Aug. 21) has just discovered what feminist theologians began to write about in 1960 with Valerie Saiving's article, "The Human Situation: A Feminine View." More and more women who feel disconnected, invalidated, and unfulfilled after many years of marriage and children are turning at age 50 to seminaries to find the answers. Last year San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo had more women than men enrolled. Women are becoming increasingly dissatisfied with the pap they are spoon-fed in Sunday schools.
BOOKS
August 16, 1987 | Connie Zweig, Zweig, a Los Angeles free-lance writer, is the author of "Learn to Take Yes for an Answer" (Jeremy P. Tarcher, forthcoming).
In his book "1984," George Orwell foresaw a future in which a "Ministry of Truth" would rewrite society's books and refashion its ideas so that they would fit the requirements of the men in power. According to Riane Eisler, this eerie phenomenon already happened long ago. Eisler traces the unseen forces that shape human culture, from prehistory through recorded history and into the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1989
Davis' column skipped over an important point. There are thousands of voices speaking out at any moment about the problems facing America, but once an individual states the need for sweeping change he is likely to be denied access to the media. Intellectuals such as Noam Chomsky or Gore Vidal may get mention as personalities, but to get access to their ideas one has to know their names and look for them in a bookstore. There has been a campaign for the last several months to get a progressive counterpart to William Buckley et al on PBS, but with no results I've ever seen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1990
As a male who has suffered the slings and arrows of outrageous feminism, I have some sympathy for the complaints of Arnold about the blatant misandrosy now raging in the land. However, Arnold's debating techniques do not inspire confidence. In referring to the research cited by the Mills rebels he calls it "pseudo-research." He does not offer any rebuttal; he evidently thinks name-calling can pass for argument. Also, in attacking misandrosy, Arnold picks some mighty strange targets.
MAGAZINE
February 16, 1992 | DEANNE STILLMA, Deanne Stillman is working on a book about surf culture, to be published by Dell
TO USE THE PARLANCE OF THE time, mythology is making a comeback. I'm not referring to such modern myths as: There's a giant alligator living in the sewers of Manhattan, Jimi Hendrix is alive and living on the same island as Jimmy Hoffa and Jim Croce, or Ted Koppel has no legs. I am referring to the ancient myths of Egypt, Greece and Rome--lore passed through the centuries by oracles, witches and pagans.
NEWS
August 21, 1989 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
It is an idyllic place where Riane Eisler lives with her husband, David Loye--a graceful old house hidden away in a garden, its rooms nevertheless filled with light. Pale Chinese carpets line the floors, ethnic art objects are on the walls and shelves, quiet prevails. Scattered throughout are original and copied figurines that bear witness to the worship of the goddess in various prehistoric societies.
MAGAZINE
July 30, 1989
All the latest hoopla over goddesses (Gimbutas, Riane Eisler) and mythology (Joseph Campbell) has produced a deluge of articles. I've yet to see in any of them so much as a mention of the late poet and scholar Robert Graves, whose name used to be synonymous with both. A. REED Los Angeles
BOOKS
August 16, 1987 | Connie Zweig, Zweig, a Los Angeles free-lance writer, is the author of "Learn to Take Yes for an Answer" (Jeremy P. Tarcher, forthcoming).
In his book "1984," George Orwell foresaw a future in which a "Ministry of Truth" would rewrite society's books and refashion its ideas so that they would fit the requirements of the men in power. According to Riane Eisler, this eerie phenomenon already happened long ago. Eisler traces the unseen forces that shape human culture, from prehistory through recorded history and into the future.
MAGAZINE
June 11, 1989 | JACQUES LESLIE, Jacques Leslie is a former Los Angeles Times foreign correspondent
IT IS HARD TO IMAGINE a book less likely than "The Goddesses and Gods of Old Europe" to cause a sensation. Its subject matter, the spiritual practices of people living in southeastern Europe 6,000 to 8,000 years ago, usually holds appeal for few people other than a fraction of the world's archeologists. Reflecting the fact that its author, Lithuanian-born Marija Gimbutas, writes for an academic audience, its prose is wooden. Even its publisher, a British firm called Thames & Hudson, was so uncertain of the book's success that it released the work in 1974 without publicity.
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