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Ribavirin

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BUSINESS
December 14, 1990 | From a Times Staff Writer
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. said Thursday that the government of India has approved its antiviral drug ribavirin for the treatment of acute hepatitis and several other ailments. "We believe it is an important approval for the company because of the prevalence of hepatitis in India," said Jack Scholl, an ICN spokesman.
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NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A major advance in treating hepatitis C appears to be on the horizon. Researchers reported Wednesday that combining two antiviral medications was effective in stopping the infection in some patients who were not helped by the traditional treatment. Progress in fighting hepatitis C infection is of high importance because millions of Americans have the virus. However, the standard treatment with the medication interferon, while effective in many people, is linked to severe side effects.
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NEWS
March 22, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Two drugs that separately may be somewhat useful against AIDS show noticeably less effectiveness--and may even harm patients--when used together, scientists say. Researchers at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital and elsewhere reached this conclusion after testing the two drugs, AZT and ribavirin, in several different human cell cultures and found that the two agents antagonized one another. "It's conceivable that this mechanism happens in people as well," Dr. Markus W. Vogt warned.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved marketing of the Merck drug boceprevir, the first new drug for hepatitis C in 20 years. The agency is still considering approval of a similar drug, telaprevir, and is expected to approve it soon as well. Both drugs are members of a new class of hepatitis drugs called protease inhibitors, which block a key enzyme required by the virus to replicate. They are expected to convert hepatitis C from a debilitating disease into a manageable condition for the majority of people infected with the virus.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1985
The Costa Mesa drug research company said Thursday that its ribavirin drug will be tested on 21 AIDS victims at New York Hospital. The drug is used in fighting the virus believed to cause acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The company said it also is awaiting U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use of ribavirin in treating respiratory syncytial virus, a disease affecting about 800,000 infants, children and elderly annually in the United States.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2000 | Dow Jones
Costa Mesa drug maker ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. said Wednesday that sales of Rebetol to treat the highly contagious and potentially fatal hepatitis C liver disease have begun in France. ICN said that Schering-Plough Corp., which licenses ICN's ribavirin antiviral drug as part of the treatment, also is selling Rebetol in Spain, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1987 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI, Times Staff Writer
ICN Pharmaceuticals, the embattled Costa Mesa drug maker, filed an $800-million suit Thursday against a New York securities firm for allegedly campaigning to drive down the company's stock price by circulating "false, slanderous and malicious" information about ICN's anti-viral compound, ribavirin. The complaint, filed in U.S.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2000 | KAREN FESSLER, BLOOMBERG NEWS
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. Chairman Milan Panic dropped plans to sell 50,000 shares of the Costa Mesa drug manufacturer's stock, which has lost more than a third of its value in recent weeks, the company said Wednesday. The move comes ahead of ICN's annual meeting next week, when the company is expected to discuss its plan to split into three companies. Panic, along with several other ICN executives, registered last week with the Securities and Exchange Commission to sell shares.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Swiss drug company Roche Holding AG agreed to swap a stake in ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. for 8.7% of an ICN unit with rights to a top-selling hepatitis C drug, ICN said Thursday. The transaction gives Roche a stake in the division known as Ribapharm, which controls the drug ribavirin and an early version of its potential successor. Roche has an option to raise its Ribapharm stake to 17.5% by buying more ICN shares and then converting them, ICN said.
NEWS
May 13, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved marketing of the Merck drug boceprevir, the first new drug for hepatitis C in 20 years. The agency is still considering approval of a similar drug, telaprevir, and is expected to approve it soon as well. Both drugs are members of a new class of hepatitis drugs called protease inhibitors, which block a key enzyme required by the virus to replicate. They are expected to convert hepatitis C from a debilitating disease into a manageable condition for the majority of people infected with the virus.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Two new drugs to treat hepatitis C got strong – that is, unanimous – backing this week from an advisory panel to the FDA. Both are meant to be given in combination with standard therapy and, together, offer new options for people with the virus. One drug,  boceprevir , manufactured by Merck, has been shown in clinical trials  to roughly double the number of patients who suppress the hepatitis C  virus to undetectable levels — a “viral cure” — when compared to those who undergo regular therapy alone.  The other drug,  telaprevir , developed by Vertex, has achieved a 75% cure rate when administered to previously untreated patients as part of combination therapy.  The panel’s decisions don’t guarantee FDA approval, but the FDA tends to follow the panel’s recommendations.
HEALTH
March 31, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Two experimental drugs promise to transform hepatitis C from a debilitating liver disease into a manageable condition for a majority of patients, researchers said Wednesday. The new drugs work by blocking a key enzyme that the hepatitis C virus needs to make copies of itself and spread. They promise to revolutionize treatment for patients in much the same way as protease inhibitors did for HIV patients in 1995, experts said. The two drugs, called boceprevir and telaprevir, nearly doubled the number of patients who achieve what is known as a sustained viral suppression — in effect, a cure — among those with new hepatitis C infections.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Valeant Pharmaceuticals International reported a first-quarter loss Thursday on higher expenses and a 48% plunge in royalties on ribavirin, a drug used to treat hepatitis C. The Costa Mesa company, formerly ICN Pharmaceuticals, reported a loss of $13.6 million, or 16 cents a share, contrasted with net income of $13.7 million, or 16 cents, in the first quarter of 2003. Revenue in the quarter was $157.7 million, essentially flat from $158.7 million a year earlier.
HEALTH
September 1, 2003 | Linda Marsa, Special to The Times
Of the millions of Americans infected with hepatitis C, only half respond to treatment. The others live with the constant threat that their health may suddenly, and fatally, deteriorate. A new drug could improve those odds. When used with the antiviral drug interferon, a medication called Zadaxin may help thousands of patients better fight the disease. "This medication looks promising for people who don't respond to other drugs," says Dr.
BUSINESS
July 17, 2003 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge Wednesday dealt a potentially severe blow to Costa Mesa-based Ribapharm Inc. and its majority owner, ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc., ruling that a new generic formulation of Ribapharm's top-selling hepatitis C drug would not infringe patents owned by ICN. The case involves a copycat version of the drug, ribavirin, planned by three companies: Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2002 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Costa Mesa on Monday agreed to pay $1 million and accepted an unusual federal review of its drug-related news releases to settle a lawsuit by the Securities and Exchange Commission charging that it misled investors about its hepatitis C drug ribavirin. Company founder and ex-Chief Executive Milan Panic, a former prime minister of Yugoslavia, also agreed to pay $500,000 to settle similar charges against him.
NEWS
July 26, 1985 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
A leading scientist at a French research institute said Thursday that Rock Hudson's decision to be treated for AIDS in Paris should not cause patients with the lethal disease to assume that treatment there is better than in the United States. "We have no more treatment than any other institute," said Dr. Luc Montagnier, chief of virology at the Pasteur Institute in Paris and discoverer--together with an American team--of the virus that causes AIDS. "We have no breakthrough," he added.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A major advance in treating hepatitis C appears to be on the horizon. Researchers reported Wednesday that combining two antiviral medications was effective in stopping the infection in some patients who were not helped by the traditional treatment. Progress in fighting hepatitis C infection is of high importance because millions of Americans have the virus. However, the standard treatment with the medication interferon, while effective in many people, is linked to severe side effects.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2002 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
Investors boosted ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s shares by 30% Thursday after the Costa Mesa company announced a new management team, a restructuring plan and better-than-expected earnings. The company said Robert O'Leary, who had been serving as interim chief executive, will take the position permanently. ICN also named Timothy Tyson, an executive at British drug maker GlaxoSmithKline, as president and chief operating officer, and Bary G.
BUSINESS
August 27, 2002 | From Reuters and Bloomberg News
Ribapharm Inc. on Monday filed a lawsuit to prevent Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche Holding from selling a hepatitis treatment in the United States that would compete with ribavirin, the Costa Mesa company's only product. Ribapharm, which is majority owned by ICN Pharmaceuticals Inc., filed similar suits earlier this month against Roche in the Netherlands and Germany. In its suit filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, Ribapharm says it intends to enforce its U.S. patents on ribavirin.
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