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Ric Munoz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1992 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the five years since Ric Munoz learned he had the AIDS virus, he has watched his time grow short. As short as 2 hours and 52 minutes, to be exact. When the West Hollywood runner makes his stoop-shouldered way to the start of the Boston Marathon today, he will be out to cut that time, his personal record for a 26.2-mile race. He will not think about the virus inside him that is, so far, little more than an abstraction in an otherwise healthy life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1997 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the same starting line Ric Munoz stood at in 1983. Only Sunday, as Munoz again ran the Western Hemisphere Marathon in Culver City, he achieved a personal milestone by clocking his 100th marathon. Munoz has done most of the 100 marathons--running through the streets of London, Los Angeles, New York and Boston--knowing that he is infected with HIV. Three hours, four minutes and eight seconds after bolting from the starting line, the wiry 39-year-old West Hollywood runner, wearing bib No.
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SPORTS
November 9, 1991
I am a long-distance runner whose specialty is the marathon. Five years ago, I got the same news Magic Johnson announced yesterday. Like Magic, I do not have the disease, but I carry in my bloodstream the HIV virus that causes AIDS. Prior to learning of my status, I'd run six marathons. Since then, I've run 34 more, including this year's L.A. Marathon, which I finished in 2 hours 54 minutes. Obviously, I've rejected "giving up" on life and all that it offers. Magic must avoid defeatist attitudes at all costs, otherwise it'll be more than his basketball career that'll end quickly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1992
Ric Munoz, a West Hollywood runner who has known for five years that he has the AIDS virus, got what he wanted out of the Boston Marathon Monday: his best time ever. Munoz, 34, beat his former mark by three seconds to finish the 26.2-mile course in 2:52:32. That left him more than 44 minutes behind winner Ibrahim Hussein of Kenya, and 572nd out of the 8,135 finishers, but Munoz said Wednesday that he was elated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1992
Ric Munoz, a West Hollywood runner who has known for five years that he has the AIDS virus, got what he wanted out of the Boston Marathon Monday: his best time ever. Munoz, 34, beat his former mark by three seconds to finish the 26.2-mile course in 2:52:32. That left him more than 44 minutes behind winner Ibrahim Hussein of Kenya, and 572nd out of the 8,135 finishers, but Munoz said Wednesday that he was elated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1997 | SONIA NAZARIO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the same starting line Ric Munoz stood at in 1983. Only Sunday, as Munoz again ran the Western Hemisphere Marathon in Culver City, he achieved a personal milestone by clocking his 100th marathon. Munoz has done most of the 100 marathons--running through the streets of London, Los Angeles, New York and Boston--knowing that he is infected with HIV. Three hours, four minutes and eight seconds after bolting from the starting line, the wiry 39-year-old West Hollywood runner, wearing bib No.
SPORTS
March 1, 1997
Misty-eyed and riding the MTA No. 33 home from work, I finished Bill Plaschke's heartfelt and inspiring column about the truly heroic efforts of Mr. Blanco ["It's Not Who Gets to the Finish Line First," Feb. 25]. My civic pride in Los Angeles is well known among my friends and family, but never did it well up in me as it did while reading Mr. Plaschke's article. We are Los Angeles. We have no "New York" styled anything. Especially not a marathon. As Angelenos, either transplants or natives like myself, we would do well to try to nurture a unified pride in our diverse city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992
And The Winners Are. . . 1992 CITY OF ANGELS AWARDS Long Beach Little League, for winning the Little League World Series title after a Filipino team was found to have cheated. Oscar De La Hoya, the boxer from Los Angeles' Eastside, for fulfilling a promise he made to his dying mother: winning a gold medal in the Olympics. Ric Munoz, a 34-year-old West Hollywood legal secretary and marathon runner, for completing his 50th marathon despite being infected with the AIDS virus.
NEWS
June 13, 1994 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the biggest, most spirited families imaginable is about to converge here, clogging the streets in a way that may be historic, celebrating with parties around the clock and booking as many rooms as the hotels can accommodate. The gay and lesbian throngs are coming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1992 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the five years since Ric Munoz learned he had the AIDS virus, he has watched his time grow short. As short as 2 hours and 52 minutes, to be exact. When the West Hollywood runner makes his stoop-shouldered way to the start of the Boston Marathon today, he will be out to cut that time, his personal record for a 26.2-mile race. He will not think about the virus inside him that is, so far, little more than an abstraction in an otherwise healthy life.
SPORTS
November 9, 1991
I am a long-distance runner whose specialty is the marathon. Five years ago, I got the same news Magic Johnson announced yesterday. Like Magic, I do not have the disease, but I carry in my bloodstream the HIV virus that causes AIDS. Prior to learning of my status, I'd run six marathons. Since then, I've run 34 more, including this year's L.A. Marathon, which I finished in 2 hours 54 minutes. Obviously, I've rejected "giving up" on life and all that it offers. Magic must avoid defeatist attitudes at all costs, otherwise it'll be more than his basketball career that'll end quickly.
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