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Ricardo Arias Calderon

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NEWS
October 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Opposition leader Ricardo Arias Calderon, a former opposition candidate for vice president, and eight supporters were reportedly arrested Sunday by the Panamanian police. The Civic Democratic Opposition Alliance said the nine members of the Christian Democratic Party were arrested as they toured the countryside campaigning for the ouster of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, the country's military strongman.
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NEWS
May 6, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Panama were a television show, it would be a comic soap opera, a nutty blend of melodrama and farce, a sort of "As the World Turns" meets "Saturday Night Live." It requires a near total suspension of disbelief to accept as reality that a president nicknamed "Honey Bun" fired a major coalition partner called the "Mad Nun" after the president's wife challenged her husband's manliness.
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NEWS
October 3, 1989
Panamanian opposition leader Ricardo Arias Calderon and eight companions were freed in the provincial capital of Santiago after being jailed for 20 hours. They were arrested Sunday on charges of urging citizens not to pay taxes as part of the effort to topple strongman Manuel A. Noriega. The nation's attorney general said the nine still face charges of "crimes against the state . . . and the national economy."
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overcoming strong U.S. doubts and intense political opposition, Ricardo Arias Calderon, the first vice president of Panama, is rebuilding the military with many of the same officers and men who made up Manuel A. Noriega's corrupt and brutal Panama Defense Forces.
NEWS
July 5, 1987 | Associated Press
Thousands of women dressed in white staged Panama's largest anti-government demonstration in years Saturday, marching through city streets with supporters honking their car horns. The march began in a northern suburb and proceeded through middle- and upper-class neighborhoods, growing in size block by block en route to the city's center. The opposition is demanding that the military stop running the government.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The cash-strapped government of Panama is trying to get around U.S. prohibitions on money transfers to its treasury by tapping funds held by private Panamanian banks here and in the United States. On Thursday, the government ordered private Panamanian bankers to cash checks made out to the government for payments of taxes and services and give the money to the government. Bankers, whose institutions have been closed since early March, are resisting the request.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | Associated Press
President Eric Delvalle said Sunday night that he had ordered an investigation into allegations of corruption, election fraud and conspiracy to murder against Panama's top military officer. In a nationally broadcast speech aimed at defusing a month-old political crisis, Delvalle said the accusations against Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, commander of the defense force, "demand a prompt and effective investigation." He said he had asked Atty. Gen. Carlos Villalaz to undertake the inquiry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989 | I. ROBERTO EISENMANN JR., I. Roberto Eisenmann Jr. is the editor of La Prensa, Panama's independent newspaper of record, which is now closed and occupied by the Panamanian military
Last month, the people of Panama took their destiny into their own hands: Against the most difficult odds, they overwhelmingly chose democracy, clearly rejecting the narco-militarism represented by Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega. They elected a legislature and a president, Guillermo Endara, a first vice president, Ricardo Arias Calderon, and a second vice president, Guillermo Ford. According to Panama's constitution, the formal swearing-in ceremony of the newly elected government is to be carried out on Sept.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Panama were a television show, it would be a comic soap opera, a nutty blend of melodrama and farce, a sort of "As the World Turns" meets "Saturday Night Live." It requires a near total suspension of disbelief to accept as reality that a president nicknamed "Honey Bun" fired a major coalition partner called the "Mad Nun" after the president's wife challenged her husband's manliness.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Panamanian opposition leaders said Thursday that they would join in a short-term provisional government with members of the country's current military regime, but only if strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega agreed to step down and acknowledge that his foes won Sunday's presidential election. "The Democratic Alliance for Civic Opposition is willing to negotiate with the military regime a provisional government," said Ricardo Arias Calderon, a vice presidential candidate for the anti-Noriega coalition known as ADOC.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama will need at least $1.2 billion to rebuild its economy from the wreckage left by the ravages of Manuel A. Noriega's corrupt rule and the devastation that accompanied the American invasion and occupation of the country, Panamanian officials and economists say. Likening the task to the radical reconstruction of Japan after World War II, Second Vice President Guillermo (Billy) Ford said in an interview that "we will easily need $1.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massive U.S. invasion force on Wednesday overthrew the regime of Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega, chasing the dictator into hiding with an air and infantry assault that left at least 15 American GIs dead. The White House offered a $1-million reward for information leading to Noriega's capture.
NEWS
October 3, 1989
Panamanian opposition leader Ricardo Arias Calderon and eight companions were freed in the provincial capital of Santiago after being jailed for 20 hours. They were arrested Sunday on charges of urging citizens not to pay taxes as part of the effort to topple strongman Manuel A. Noriega. The nation's attorney general said the nine still face charges of "crimes against the state . . . and the national economy."
NEWS
October 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Opposition leader Ricardo Arias Calderon, a former opposition candidate for vice president, and eight supporters were reportedly arrested Sunday by the Panamanian police. The Civic Democratic Opposition Alliance said the nine members of the Christian Democratic Party were arrested as they toured the countryside campaigning for the ouster of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, the country's military strongman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1989 | I. ROBERTO EISENMANN JR., I. Roberto Eisenmann Jr. is the editor of La Prensa, Panama's independent newspaper of record, which is now closed and occupied by the Panamanian military
Last month, the people of Panama took their destiny into their own hands: Against the most difficult odds, they overwhelmingly chose democracy, clearly rejecting the narco-militarism represented by Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega. They elected a legislature and a president, Guillermo Endara, a first vice president, Ricardo Arias Calderon, and a second vice president, Guillermo Ford. According to Panama's constitution, the formal swearing-in ceremony of the newly elected government is to be carried out on Sept.
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
Panamanian opposition leaders said Thursday that they would join in a short-term provisional government with members of the country's current military regime, but only if strongman Gen. Manuel A. Noriega agreed to step down and acknowledge that his foes won Sunday's presidential election. "The Democratic Alliance for Civic Opposition is willing to negotiate with the military regime a provisional government," said Ricardo Arias Calderon, a vice presidential candidate for the anti-Noriega coalition known as ADOC.
NEWS
December 29, 1989 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panama will need at least $1.2 billion to rebuild its economy from the wreckage left by the ravages of Manuel A. Noriega's corrupt rule and the devastation that accompanied the American invasion and occupation of the country, Panamanian officials and economists say. Likening the task to the radical reconstruction of Japan after World War II, Second Vice President Guillermo (Billy) Ford said in an interview that "we will easily need $1.
NEWS
June 25, 1990 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overcoming strong U.S. doubts and intense political opposition, Ricardo Arias Calderon, the first vice president of Panama, is rebuilding the military with many of the same officers and men who made up Manuel A. Noriega's corrupt and brutal Panama Defense Forces.
NEWS
March 25, 1988 | DAN WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
The cash-strapped government of Panama is trying to get around U.S. prohibitions on money transfers to its treasury by tapping funds held by private Panamanian banks here and in the United States. On Thursday, the government ordered private Panamanian bankers to cash checks made out to the government for payments of taxes and services and give the money to the government. Bankers, whose institutions have been closed since early March, are resisting the request.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | Associated Press
President Eric Delvalle said Sunday night that he had ordered an investigation into allegations of corruption, election fraud and conspiracy to murder against Panama's top military officer. In a nationally broadcast speech aimed at defusing a month-old political crisis, Delvalle said the accusations against Gen. Manuel A. Noriega, commander of the defense force, "demand a prompt and effective investigation." He said he had asked Atty. Gen. Carlos Villalaz to undertake the inquiry.
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