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Ricardo Asch

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January 20, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fertility specialist at the heart of the UC Irvine scandal testified Friday that university employees, including a medical assistant and a biologist without a college degree, were responsible for any errors that occurred in the clinics where he practiced. Dr. Ricardo H. Asch, speaking for the first time under oath at a deposition in a Tijuana hotel, said he was not involved in running the clinics beyond performing surgery, according to attorneys who attended the closed deposition.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2011 | By Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times
Federal prosecutors have lost their bid to extradite Dr. Ricardo Asch from Mexico, which has decided against sending the fugitive physician back to the United States to face charges stemming from the UC Irvine fertility scandal 16 years ago, a top Mexican official confirmed Thursday. Asch, who headed the internationally renowned Center for Reproductive Health, fled the country in 1995 amid allegations that he took eggs and embryos from some patients without their consent and gave them to other women.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for embattled fertility specialist Dr. Ricardo H. Asch lashed out at UC Irvine on Monday in a court filing accusing university officials of a "pattern of despicable conduct" and "unprecedented . . . abuse of the judicial process." Irvine attorney Ken E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2011 | By Kim Christensen, Los Angeles Times
Federal prosecutors were surprised to learn this week that Dr. Ricardo Asch, who was being held in Mexico City for extradition to the United States on charges stemming from a fertility clinic scandal that rocked UC Irvine and the world of reproductive medicine 16 years ago, has been freed from custody. Informed of the release by The Times, officials said Tuesday they were seeking an explanation from Mexico about the handling the extradition. "We still expect the authorities in Mexico to give full consideration to our request" to return Asch, said Assistant U.S. Atty.
NEWS
July 29, 1995 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
UC San Diego officials announced Friday that Dr. Ricardo H. Asch may have victimized at least five patients in a human egg-swapping scheme at the university, broadening the scope of the UC fertility scandal to 40 women at three Southern California medical centers.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his first wide-ranging interviews about the UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal, former clinic director Dr. Ricardo H. Asch lashed out Monday at what he called a vengeful university and a willingness among the media to believe the accusations against him. "I blame all of you," the doctor told reporters. Appearing well-rested, Asch portrayed himself in back-to-back media interviews throughout the day as bewildered and betrayed.
NEWS
October 24, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embattled fertility doctor Ricardo H. Asch has sold his Newport Beach home, fueling fears that he and former partner Jose P. Balmaceda have left the country for good. County property records reveal that Asch, one of three physicians implicated in the UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal, sold his $1-million residence in the gated community of Big Canyon about the time that federal agents raided the home and Asch's Santa Ana medical office in search of evidence.
NEWS
November 15, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ricardo H. Asch, former director of the fertility clinic that plunged UC Irvine into an international scandal, was indicted Thursday on federal charges that he engaged in a fraudulent insurance billing scheme. The 35-count mail-fraud indictment by a federal grand jury in Los Angeles is the first against the scandal's central figure, accused by the university and patients of stealing eggs and embryos from scores of women and implanting them in other patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A committee of University of California regents this week will consider a proposal to stop paying the salaries of two doctors implicated in the UC Irvine fertility scandal, according to a confidential document. Ricardo H. Asch and Jose P. Balmaceda, accused by the university of stealing eggs and embryos from patients and giving them to others, would lose annual salaries of $95,800 and $63,700 respectively, according to the staff proposal. A third physician accused in the scandal, Sergio C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors announced new charges Tuesday against two of the UC Irvine fertility clinic doctors at the center of an international scandal, accusing the clinic's former director for the first time of stealing human eggs from some patients and implanting them in other unsuspecting women. Ten of 40 new charges against Dr. Ricardo H. Asch, the scandal's central figure, accused him of misappropriating the eggs of some former patients at UCI's now-defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2010 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
A physician who rocked a UC Irvine fertility clinic 15 years ago, when he and a partner switched the frozen embryos of dozens of unsuspecting women, is being held in Mexico City as U.S. officials race a deadline to extradite him to face criminal charges. Ricardo Asch, one of two fertility doctors who fled prosecution as the scandal in Orange County unfolded, was arrested in Mexico City on Nov. 3, said Thom Mrozek, spokesman for the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles. He remains in custody as U.S. prosecutors seek to extradite him to Southern California to face federal mail fraud and tax evasion charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2009 | Kimi Yoshino
The UC Board of Regents have quietly settled a dozen lawsuits stemming from fertility fraud uncovered nearly 15 years ago -- drawing closer to an end a scandal that has dogged UC Irvine and left behind dozens of heartbroken couples. Shirel and Steve Crawford recently deposited their $675,000 settlement, minus legal fees, but it brought them little peace. In the late 1980s, in the midst of what many consider the country's worst fertility scandal, the Crawfords believe their embryos were given to a woman referred to in documents as "Mrs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2000
University of California regents were right this month to fire Dr. Ricardo Asch, one of three physicians involved in the fertility scandal at UC Irvine. Academic freedom is important, as the university's stewards have recognized for decades, but in this case it was outweighed by Asch's activities. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio Stone were the heart of the acclaimed fertility clinic they operated in partnership with UCI.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to recoup millions of dollars spent on legal settlements, the UC Board of Regents voted Friday to sue the doctors who ran the scandal-ridden fertility clinic at UC Irvine. The regents want Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio Stone to reimburse them for more than $19 million the university has agreed to pay infertile couples who sought help at the now-defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
NEWS
July 17, 1999 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to recoup millions of dollars spent on legal settlements, the UC Board of Regents voted Friday to sue the doctors who ran the scandal-ridden fertility clinic at UC Irvine. The regents want Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone to reimburse them for more than $19 million that the university has agreed to pay infertile couples who sought help at the once acclaimed but now defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
NEWS
March 26, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
The three UC Irvine doctors who allegedly stole eggs harvested from women undergoing fertility treatments at four Southern California clinics owe the university $2.47 million, mostly from unreported revenue, according to a state auditor's investigation released Wednesday. The auditor found that the three once-acclaimed fertility experts, Ricardo Asch, Jose Balmaceda and Sergio Stone, failed to report $7.83 million in revenue from their partnership with the university.
NEWS
January 31, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY and JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scandal surrounding fertility specialist Dr. Ricardo H. Asch widened yet again Tuesday, when officials at UC San Diego accused him of taking at least two dozen eggs and embryos from patients there and giving them to a University of Wisconsin researcher without patient permission or UC San Diego approval.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | LESLIE BERKMAN and LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A renowned UCI fertility expert stepped up his defense Wednesday against allegations of impropriety, contending he is the target of an extortionist and is willing to take a lie detector test to prove he has done nothing wrong, his lawyers said. An attorney for Dr. Ricardo H. Asch released copies of a letter he claims was sent to Asch and two other doctors at the UCI Center for Reproductive Health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors announced new charges Tuesday against two of the UC Irvine fertility clinic doctors at the center of an international scandal, accusing the clinic's former director for the first time of stealing human eggs from some patients and implanting them in other unsuspecting women. Ten of 40 new charges against Dr. Ricardo H. Asch, the scandal's central figure, accused him of misappropriating the eggs of some former patients at UCI's now-defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
NEWS
November 19, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors announced new charges Tuesday against two of the UC Irvine fertility clinic doctors at the center of an international scandal, accusing the clinic's former director for the first time of stealing human eggs from some patients and implanting them in other unsuspecting women. Ten of 40 new charges against Dr. Ricardo H. Asch, the scandal's central figure, accused him of misappropriating the eggs of some former patients at UC Irvine's now-defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
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