Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRicardo H Asch
IN THE NEWS

Ricardo H Asch

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
Regarding the recent UCI cancer research controversy: A pattern is emerging which started with Drs. Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone [at UCI's now defunct fertility clinic]. UCI is willing to forge any revenue-producing relationship, as well as encourage its professional staff to forge these relationships, to enhance its own wealth and the personal wealth of its academicians and medical staff. Through the abuse of federal and state funds, taxpayers are funding the personal wealth of physicians and businessmen who form alliances in the name of "scientific research," only to promote their own wealth and the wealth of their shareholders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
Regarding the recent UCI cancer research controversy: A pattern is emerging which started with Drs. Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone [at UCI's now defunct fertility clinic]. UCI is willing to forge any revenue-producing relationship, as well as encourage its professional staff to forge these relationships, to enhance its own wealth and the personal wealth of its academicians and medical staff. Through the abuse of federal and state funds, taxpayers are funding the personal wealth of physicians and businessmen who form alliances in the name of "scientific research," only to promote their own wealth and the wealth of their shareholders.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1995
The attorney for a couple alleging that doctors at UC Irvine's fertility clinic gave their embryos to other couples without their permission said Saturday that he would be filing seven lawsuits against the university on behalf of couples making similar allegations. Theodore S. Wentworth said the allegations in the lawsuits would resemble those made in June by Debbie and John Challender of Newport Beach. In that suit, which names the university, the fertility center and doctors Ricardo H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors announced new charges Tuesday against two of the UC Irvine fertility clinic doctors at the center of an international scandal, accusing the clinic's former director for the first time of stealing human eggs from some patients and implanting them in other unsuspecting women. Ten of 40 new charges against Dr. Ricardo H. Asch, the scandal's central figure, accused him of misappropriating the eggs of some former patients at UCI's now-defunct Center for Reproductive Health.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1996
The physician at the center of the UC Irvine fertility scandal accused the university's top administrators of failing to correct faulty patient consent procedures for as long as two years, according to grievances filed Thursday with the University of California and UCI's Academic Senate. In a three-page document, Dr. Ricardo H. Asch alleges UCI Chancellor Laurel L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC Irvine's legal troubles stemming from the human egg-swapping scandal at its once prestigious clinic continued Wednesday as a Sacramento woman filed a lawsuit contending a 7-year-old boy is the offspring of eggs and embryos stolen from her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors ended their first day of deliberations Friday in the trial of Sergio C. Stone, the former UC Irvine fertility doctor charged with defrauding insurance companies and cheating on his income taxes. Jurors deliberated for nearly three hours before adjourning. Deliberations will resume Tuesday. Before U.S. District Judge Gary L. Taylor handed the case to the jury, the attorneys made their final pleas. Stone's attorney, John D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former UC Irvine fertility doctor Ricardo H. Asch is refusing to show up at a deposition scheduled for Friday in an Orange law office, raising questions about whether the doctor will continue testimony begun in Tijuana last month. Meanwhile, a former employee of Asch--whom the doctor has specifically blamed for "errors" in clinics where he worked--is set to be questioned under oath at the end of the month in San Antonio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors described former UCI fertility doctor Sergio C. Stone on Thursday as a "greedy" man who conspired with his ex-partners to avoid paying taxes and to dupe insurance companies so that they could reap extra profits. Stone's attorney denied the allegation, saying his client did not intend to deceive anyone and that he was "left out of this criminal loop" by his former colleagues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for patients suing UC Irvine fertility specialist Ricardo H. Asch served notice Wednesday that they are seeking to have his unfinished deposition continued in an Orange law office later this month. But Asch's civil attorney, Lloyd Charton, said his client won't show up for the Feb. 16 proceeding unless the doctor's criminal lawyer wins assurances from federal officials that Asch won't be arrested.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jurors ended their first day of deliberations Friday in the trial of Sergio C. Stone, the former UC Irvine fertility doctor charged with defrauding insurance companies and cheating on his income taxes. Jurors deliberated for nearly three hours before adjourning. Deliberations will resume Tuesday. Before U.S. District Judge Gary L. Taylor handed the case to the jury, the attorneys made their final pleas. Stone's attorney, John D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1997 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors described former UCI fertility doctor Sergio C. Stone on Thursday as a "greedy" man who conspired with his ex-partners to avoid paying taxes and to dupe insurance companies so that they could reap extra profits. Stone's attorney denied the allegation, saying his client did not intend to deceive anyone and that he was "left out of this criminal loop" by his former colleagues.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Sergio C. Stone is one of three partners blamed for the UC Irvine fertility scandal, but he is the first--and may be the only one--to be brought to trial on criminal charges. But although opening statements in Stone's trial are scheduled to be made today in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, jurors won't hear about the nationwide scandal in which human reproductive eggs and embryos were allegedly stolen and then transplanted into other women or shipped off to medical research laboratories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1996
The physician at the center of the UC Irvine fertility scandal accused the university's top administrators of failing to correct faulty patient consent procedures for as long as two years, according to grievances filed Thursday with the University of California and UCI's Academic Senate. In a three-page document, Dr. Ricardo H. Asch alleges UCI Chancellor Laurel L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ricardo H. Asch, the doctor at the center of UC Irvine's fertility clinic scandal, was "surprised" and "deeply saddened" by his former chief biologist's assertion last week that she copied confidential records as insurance against any attempt by the physician to sabotage her career, Asch's attorney said Saturday. "He never would have tried to blackball Teri [Ord]. He can't believe she even felt that way," said Josefina Walker, who represented Asch's interests in San Antonio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the latest fallout from the UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal, an attorney for the birth parents of 6-year-old twins said the couple is unlikely to submit their children to genetic testing requested by a former patient of Dr. Ricardo H. Asch. The former patient, Loretta Jorge of Corona, believes that the children were conceived with her eggs. But attorney Ron Stock, who was retained by the birth parents Monday, said that he has seen no documents substantiating her claim.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1995 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two more couples filed lawsuits Tuesday in the UC Irvine fertility clinic scandal, contending their eggs or embryos were stolen and shipped off for use in lucrative research of no benefit to them. The actions by Orange County residents Debra Ann and Kent Beasley and Riverside County residents Kimberly and Michael Dubont bring the number of lawsuits targeting UC Irvine and its three once-prized fertility specialists to 12. The three doctors, Ricardo H. Asch, Jose P. Balmaceda and Sergio C. Stone, have been accused by the University of California of misappropriating the eggs and embryos of as many as 40 women.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Sergio C. Stone is one of three partners blamed for the UC Irvine fertility scandal, but he is the first--and may be the only one--to be brought to trial on criminal charges. But although opening statements in Stone's trial are scheduled to be made today in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, jurors won't hear about the nationwide scandal in which human reproductive eggs and embryos were allegedly stolen and then transplanted into other women or shipped off to medical research laboratories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former UC Irvine fertility doctor Ricardo H. Asch is refusing to show up at a deposition scheduled for Friday in an Orange law office, raising questions about whether the doctor will continue testimony begun in Tijuana last month. Meanwhile, a former employee of Asch--whom the doctor has specifically blamed for "errors" in clinics where he worked--is set to be questioned under oath at the end of the month in San Antonio.
NEWS
February 12, 1996 | JULIE MARQUIS and LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
What renowned University of California fertility specialist Ricardo H. Asch allegedly handed to a Wisconsin zoologist was, by any measure, a precious gift. In a country where relatively few couples donate their reproductive tissues for experiments, Asch bestowed 21 freshly inseminated eggs and three frozen embryos on Gerald Schatten from 1993 to 1994, UC San Diego officials say. The well-known scientist then used them to probe the mysteries of why some fertility treatments fail.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|