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Ricardo H Robinson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an odd setting for a reunion, and there was no love lost among the participants, but three men convicted of murder in the fatal 1980 lye attack of an aspiring lawyer took turns on the witness stand in a Van Nuys courtroom on Wednesday. They wore colored jail jumpsuits of different hues. Defendant Ricardo H. Robinson, representing himself, posed questions to the others who had been brought from state prison to testify, one to clear him, one to implicate him.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After acting as his own lawyer in a retrial that rekindled memories of an excruciating death 14 years ago, Ricardo H. Robinson was convicted of first-degree murder in a 1980 lye attack on an aspiring lawyer. Besides the murder conviction, the eight women and four men on the jury also found Robinson guilty of mayhem, conspiracy and assault for attacking Patricia Worrell with a caustic chemical. The jurors, who deliberated for two days, declined to talk about the case.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After acting as his own lawyer in a retrial that rekindled memories of an excruciating death 14 years ago, Ricardo H. Robinson was convicted of first-degree murder in a 1980 lye attack on an aspiring lawyer. Besides the murder conviction, the eight women and four men on the jury also found Robinson guilty of mayhem, conspiracy and assault for attacking Patricia Worrell with a caustic chemical. The jurors, who deliberated for two days, declined to talk about the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994
After acting as his own lawyer in a retrial that rekindled memories of an excruciating death 14 years ago, Ricardo H. Robinson was convicted Thursday of first-degree murder in a 1980 lye attack on an aspiring lawyer. Besides the murder conviction, the jury also found Robinson guilty of mayhem, conspiracy and assault for attacking Patricia Worrell with a caustic chemical. The jurors, who deliberated for two days, declined to talk about the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1994
After acting as his own lawyer in a retrial that rekindled memories of an excruciating death 14 years ago, Ricardo H. Robinson was convicted Thursday of first-degree murder in a 1980 lye attack on an aspiring lawyer. Besides the murder conviction, the jury also found Robinson guilty of mayhem, conspiracy and assault for attacking Patricia Worrell with a caustic chemical. The jurors, who deliberated for two days, declined to talk about the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The murder conviction of a man hired to participate in attacking a Sylmar law student with a caustic solution was overturned Tuesday by a federal appeals court, which said that police disregarded his request for a lawyer while he was being questioned. The convicted murderer, Ricardo H. Robinson, 32, of Las Vegas, "unequivocally invoked his right to counsel," Judge Stephen Reinhardt said in writing the majority opinion for the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 14 years have passed since Patricia Worrell's hopes of becoming a lawyer vaporized one August night when she opened the door of her Sylmar home to a stranger who tossed a quart of lye in her face. Blinded and disfigured, Worrell died 10 days later, bleeding to death as the caustic chemical she had inadvertently swallowed burned through her esophagus, then destroyed an artery. She left behind a 10-year-old son, who had been awakened by her shrieks of pain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His opening statement to the jury lasted about 30 seconds. He asked one witness if she "hates" him, and prompted another to identify him as the man who threw lye in a woman's face 14 years ago. Appearing for the defense Tuesday in Van Nuys Superior Court was Ricardo H. Robinson, defendant and jailhouse lawyer. But Robinson, the advocate, didn't score many points for Robinson, the client, during the first day of his murder retrial. "I wouldn't want him for my lawyer," prosecutor Robert L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 14 years have passed since Patricia Worrell's hopes of becoming a lawyer vaporized on an August night when she opened the door of her Sylmar home to a stranger who tossed a quart of lye in her face. Blinded and disfigured, Worrell died 10 days later, bleeding to death as the caustic chemical she had inadvertently swallowed burned through her esophagus, then an artery. She left behind a 10-year-old son, who had been awakened by her shrieks of pain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Former pimp Bobby Ray Savage, serving a life prison sentence in connection with a 1980 lye attack that killed a popular law student, refused to testify for the prosecution Tuesday in the retrial of a co-defendant. Savage's refusal stunned prosecutors, who will ask Superior Court Judge Michael Harwin today to allow the jury to hear a tape-recorded statement Savage gave before the trial began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an odd setting for a reunion, and there was no love lost among the participants, but three men convicted of murder in the fatal 1980 lye attack of an aspiring lawyer took turns on the witness stand in a Van Nuys courtroom on Wednesday. They wore colored jail jumpsuits of different hues. Defendant Ricardo H. Robinson, representing himself, posed questions to the others who had been brought from state prison to testify, one to clear him, one to implicate him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL
Former pimp Bobby Ray Savage, serving a life prison sentence in connection with a 1980 lye attack that killed a popular law student, refused to testify for the prosecution Tuesday in the retrial of a co-defendant. Savage's refusal stunned prosecutors, who will ask Superior Court Judge Michael Harwin today to allow the jury to hear a tape-recorded statement Savage gave before the trial began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His opening statement to the jury lasted about 30 seconds. He asked one witness if she "hates" him, and prompted another to identify him as the man who threw lye in a woman's face 14 years ago. Appearing for the defense Tuesday in Van Nuys Superior Court was Ricardo H. Robinson, defendant and jailhouse lawyer. But Robinson, the advocate, didn't score many points for Robinson, the client, during the first day of his murder retrial. "I wouldn't want him for my lawyer," prosecutor Robert L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 14 years have passed since Patricia Worrell's hopes of becoming a lawyer vaporized on an August night when she opened the door of her Sylmar home to a stranger who tossed a quart of lye in her face. Blinded and disfigured, Worrell died 10 days later, bleeding to death as the caustic chemical she had inadvertently swallowed burned through her esophagus, then an artery. She left behind a 10-year-old son, who had been awakened by her shrieks of pain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1994 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 14 years have passed since Patricia Worrell's hopes of becoming a lawyer vaporized one August night when she opened the door of her Sylmar home to a stranger who tossed a quart of lye in her face. Blinded and disfigured, Worrell died 10 days later, bleeding to death as the caustic chemical she had inadvertently swallowed burned through her esophagus, then destroyed an artery. She left behind a 10-year-old son, who had been awakened by her shrieks of pain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The murder conviction of a man hired to participate in attacking a Sylmar law student with a caustic solution was overturned Tuesday by a federal appeals court, which said that police disregarded his request for a lawyer while he was being questioned. The convicted murderer, Ricardo H. Robinson, 32, of Las Vegas, "unequivocally invoked his right to counsel," Judge Stephen Reinhardt said in writing the majority opinion for the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1993 | THOM MROZEK
A Las Vegas man, whose murder conviction for killing a Sylmar woman by throwing lye in her face was overturned by a federal appeals court, will be retried in the 1980 slaying, prosecutors said Tuesday. During a brief court hearing, an Aug. 30 trial date was scheduled for Ricardo H. Robinson, who is accused of conspiring with a hit man hired by an ex-fiance of the victim to disfigure the beautiful blond woman. Patricia Worrell was attacked on the night of Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1994 | JULIO MORAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man convicted in a retrial of murdering a Sylmar woman by throwing lye in her face 14 years ago was again sentenced Friday to 25 years to life in prison. Ricardo H. Robinson, who acted as his own attorney, was also convicted of mayhem, conspiracy and assault for the Aug. 14, 1980, fatal attack on law student Patricia Worrell, who was 34. Deputy Dist. Atty. Robert L.
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