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Ricardo Lagos

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NEWS
May 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Chilean centrist Andres Zaldivar conceded defeat to leftist Ricardo Lagos after a primary election for the presidential candidate of the ruling coalition, setting Lagos on track to be the country's next head of state. "It is Ricardo Lagos who will have to run for the Concertacion [coalition], and we will work with him loyally," Zaldivar said in a speech to his supporters from the Christian Democratic Party soon after first results showed Lagos had a massive lead. With 55.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Chilean President Ricardo Lagos called Friday for greater cooperation between government and business interests in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres so the poor can receive the benefit of free trade. "Viewed from South America, the 21st century does not appear to be delivering the kind of globalization we would like," Lagos told a gathering at UC San Diego's Institute of the Americas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1999
It has been a great pleasure to read Jorge G. Castaneda's intelligent and perceptive June 18 commentary, "Chile Is Region's Economic Indicator." As an American who spent the years between ages 18 and 33 in that wonderful and totally European country, I have followed its political history since I left in the 1950s. I am familiar with the ideas of Ricardo Lagos, who undoubtedly will become Chile's next president. Unlike Salvador Allende, Lagos will attempt to combine the issues of constitutional democracy established a century ago with socialist reforms which will improve the life of the lower classes and give more stability to a nation that is the most hard-working and progressive in the hemisphere.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
The last time a Socialist served as Chile's president, he was toppled in a bloody military coup. Ricardo Lagos was sworn in Saturday as the second Socialist president, pledging to bring a still-powerful armed forces to heel. Lagos, who embarks on a six-year term, gained national prominence more than a decade ago by taking a key role in a referendum defeat of former dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet. Today, Lagos is equally bold in insisting that Chile's armed forces defer to the elected government.
NEWS
March 12, 2000 | From Associated Press
The last time a Socialist served as Chile's president, he was toppled in a bloody military coup. Ricardo Lagos was sworn in Saturday as the second Socialist president, pledging to bring a still-powerful armed forces to heel. Lagos, who embarks on a six-year term, gained national prominence more than a decade ago by taking a key role in a referendum defeat of former dictator Gen. Augusto Pinochet. Today, Lagos is equally bold in insisting that Chile's armed forces defer to the elected government.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | United Press International
Security forces, empowered with state-of-siege authority following an assassination attempt against President Augusto Pinochet, arrested leftist leaders today, entered some radical slums, sealed off others and cracked down on the opposition press. "This is a war between Marxism and democracy," Pinochet said at the presidential palace in Santiago, where he returned today after spending the night at a villa southeast of the capital.
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ricardo Lagos, a leading dissident during this country's 17-year dictatorship and a Cabinet minister in subsequent elected governments, defeated rightist Joaquin Lavin on Sunday to become Chile's first Socialist president since the late Salvador Allende was overthrown in a 1973 coup.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
In Chile, a country under siege, emotions are as raw as the storms of ice and snow that pummel the mountains. Life is as uncertain as sleep. Ricardo Lagos was awakened by five men ranged around his bed with leveled guns. "At least they were real policemen," Lagos said later. Luis Toro was awakened by men in ski masks trying to break into his house after curfew. "They had come to kill me," Toro said. Leila Hales slept restlessly for 46 days.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
Chilean President Ricardo Lagos called Friday for greater cooperation between government and business interests in both the Northern and Southern hemispheres so the poor can receive the benefit of free trade. "Viewed from South America, the 21st century does not appear to be delivering the kind of globalization we would like," Lagos told a gathering at UC San Diego's Institute of the Americas.
WORLD
May 8, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chile legalized divorce despite strong opposition from the Roman Catholic Church. The bill signed by President Ricardo Lagos won't take effect for six months, allowing time for judges to study the changes and courts to be set up.
NEWS
January 17, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ricardo Lagos, a leading dissident during this country's 17-year dictatorship and a Cabinet minister in subsequent elected governments, defeated rightist Joaquin Lavin on Sunday to become Chile's first Socialist president since the late Salvador Allende was overthrown in a 1973 coup.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1999
It has been a great pleasure to read Jorge G. Castaneda's intelligent and perceptive June 18 commentary, "Chile Is Region's Economic Indicator." As an American who spent the years between ages 18 and 33 in that wonderful and totally European country, I have followed its political history since I left in the 1950s. I am familiar with the ideas of Ricardo Lagos, who undoubtedly will become Chile's next president. Unlike Salvador Allende, Lagos will attempt to combine the issues of constitutional democracy established a century ago with socialist reforms which will improve the life of the lower classes and give more stability to a nation that is the most hard-working and progressive in the hemisphere.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Chilean centrist Andres Zaldivar conceded defeat to leftist Ricardo Lagos after a primary election for the presidential candidate of the ruling coalition, setting Lagos on track to be the country's next head of state. "It is Ricardo Lagos who will have to run for the Concertacion [coalition], and we will work with him loyally," Zaldivar said in a speech to his supporters from the Christian Democratic Party soon after first results showed Lagos had a massive lead. With 55.
NEWS
October 26, 1986 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
In Chile, a country under siege, emotions are as raw as the storms of ice and snow that pummel the mountains. Life is as uncertain as sleep. Ricardo Lagos was awakened by five men ranged around his bed with leveled guns. "At least they were real policemen," Lagos said later. Luis Toro was awakened by men in ski masks trying to break into his house after curfew. "They had come to kill me," Toro said. Leila Hales slept restlessly for 46 days.
NEWS
September 8, 1986 | United Press International
Security forces, empowered with state-of-siege authority following an assassination attempt against President Augusto Pinochet, arrested leftist leaders today, entered some radical slums, sealed off others and cracked down on the opposition press. "This is a war between Marxism and democracy," Pinochet said at the presidential palace in Santiago, where he returned today after spending the night at a villa southeast of the capital.
NEWS
June 16, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Signaling the approach of winter in the Southern Hemisphere, a powerful storm drove about 60,000 people from their homes during a midweek rampage across central Chile, flooding low-lying parts of Santiago, the capital. Three days of rain tapered off Wednesday after soaking Santiago and a wide swath of the countryside as heavy snow blocked border crossings into Argentina. President Ricardo Lagos declared an emergency and ordered the armed forces to help.
WORLD
March 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Chile's Congress voted to legalize divorce, a landmark shift in one of the last countries in which couples have no legal way to break up their marriage. The center-left government has tried for 10 years to get a divorce law through Congress, but strong opposition from the powerful Catholic Church and conservative parties blocked previous attempts. The 120-member lower house voted on the legislation piecemeal, with some articles passing by narrow margins and others more widely.
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