Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRicardo Legorreta
IN THE NEWS

Ricardo Legorreta

FEATURED ARTICLES
REAL ESTATE
August 4, 1985
We would like to clarify an article about the Technology Center of Silicon Valley that appeared June 23. Ricardo Legorreta, one of Mexico's foremost architects, was invited, together with 14 other world renowned architects, to be considered for the design of the Center. During the selection process, Legorreta advised Technology Center officials that if he was chosen, he would invite Gruen Associates to be responsible for various phases such as production of construction documents, coordination of engineering consultants, code compliance and administration of the construction phase because of the firm's proven expertise in these areas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2012 | Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
Ricardo Legorreta, the architect who introduced Mexican modernism to a global audience and who brought his crisp, brightly colored aesthetic to downtown Los Angeles with a controversial 1993 redesign of Pershing Square, has died. He was 80. Legorreta died Dec. 30 in Mexico City of liver cancer, according to Adriana Ciklik, a principal in the Mexico City-based firm Legorreta and Legorreta, which the architect had run in recent years with his son Victor. Although Legorreta's work featured the clean lines and spare forms of modern design, it also incorporated elements of Mexican vernacular architecture including thick protective walls, spacious courtyards and bold color.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
"We are not making people happy in our buildings," architect Ricardo Legorreta of Mexico told a capacity audience at UC Irvine on Thursday night. "In good architecture, either a queen or a beggar would feel very happy."
BUSINESS
April 3, 2011 | By Darrell Satzman
A sculptural assemblage of rectangles imbued with earth tones that change hues with the shifting light sets a warm tone at a Brentwood equestrian compound that pays homage to a Mexican master. Designed by Marc Whipple of the Los Angeles firm Whipple Russell Architects, the single-level contemporary embraces the solid geometric forms, bright colors, walled patios and interplay of light and shadow favored by famed architect Ricardo Legorreta, whose international resume boasts art museums, cathedrals, hotels, homes and public gathering places, including L.A.'s Pershing Square.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta painted one wall a vivid purple in a new shopping center he designed in Tustin, the city's mayor protested so vehemently that Legorreta was forced to recolor the wall a more modest ocher. "The incident taught me something about the profound differences that lie beneath the surface similarities Southern California shares with my homeland," Legorreta said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2012 | Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times
Ricardo Legorreta, the architect who introduced Mexican modernism to a global audience and who brought his crisp, brightly colored aesthetic to downtown Los Angeles with a controversial 1993 redesign of Pershing Square, has died. He was 80. Legorreta died Dec. 30 in Mexico City of liver cancer, according to Adriana Ciklik, a principal in the Mexico City-based firm Legorreta and Legorreta, which the architect had run in recent years with his son Victor. Although Legorreta's work featured the clean lines and spare forms of modern design, it also incorporated elements of Mexican vernacular architecture including thick protective walls, spacious courtyards and bold color.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2011 | By Darrell Satzman
A sculptural assemblage of rectangles imbued with earth tones that change hues with the shifting light sets a warm tone at a Brentwood equestrian compound that pays homage to a Mexican master. Designed by Marc Whipple of the Los Angeles firm Whipple Russell Architects, the single-level contemporary embraces the solid geometric forms, bright colors, walled patios and interplay of light and shadow favored by famed architect Ricardo Legorreta, whose international resume boasts art museums, cathedrals, hotels, homes and public gathering places, including L.A.'s Pershing Square.
REAL ESTATE
January 29, 1989
Architects Ricardo Legorreta of Mexico, Fumihiko Maki of Japan, Richard Meier of the United States and Richard Rogers of England will join in a free, full-day symposium, "Architecture/Shaping the Future," on Saturday at UC San Diego, starting at 9 a.m. The symposium will celebrate the founding of the University's new School of Architecture. Meier has been commissioned to design the Getty Art Center in Los Angeles and Legorreta the International Student Center at UCLA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Carlos Diniz, an architectural renderer who worked with many of the world's most celebrated architects, died July 18 in Santa Barbara of complications from heart failure. He was 72. Diniz was best known for his drawings of large-scale, high-profile developments, such as New York's World Trade Center and London's Canary Wharf. His best drawings were meticulous, often colorful representations of a building and its setting.
REAL ESTATE
June 23, 1985
Gruen Associates of Los Angeles and Legorreta Arquitectos of Mexico City have been named architects of the $100-million, 250,000-square-foot Technology Center of Silicon Valley, a high-technology and science museum planned for San Jose. Construction is expected to begin next year, with completion scheduled for late 1988 for the facility to be built on an eight-acre site alongside the Guadalupe River in downtown San Jose, near Interstate 280.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
When Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta painted one wall a vivid purple in a new shopping center he designed in Tustin, the city's mayor protested so vehemently that Legorreta was forced to recolor the wall a more modest ocher. "The incident taught me something about the profound differences that lie beneath the surface similarities Southern California shares with my homeland," Legorreta said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1989 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
"We are not making people happy in our buildings," architect Ricardo Legorreta of Mexico told a capacity audience at UC Irvine on Thursday night. "In good architecture, either a queen or a beggar would feel very happy."
REAL ESTATE
August 4, 1985
We would like to clarify an article about the Technology Center of Silicon Valley that appeared June 23. Ricardo Legorreta, one of Mexico's foremost architects, was invited, together with 14 other world renowned architects, to be considered for the design of the Center. During the selection process, Legorreta advised Technology Center officials that if he was chosen, he would invite Gruen Associates to be responsible for various phases such as production of construction documents, coordination of engineering consultants, code compliance and administration of the construction phase because of the firm's proven expertise in these areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2012 | By David Ng
Composer Philip Glass and artist Cai Guo-Qiang are among the recently announced laureates of the 2012 Praemium Imperiale awards, organized by the Japan Art Assn. The annual awards are considered one of the most prestigious cultural honors in the world. This year's winners also include architect Henning Larsen, sculptor Cecco Bonanotte and ballet dancer Yoko Morishita. The awards honor the recipients' lifetime achievements in their respective creative fields, and come with a prize of approximately $187,000 each.
MAGAZINE
June 26, 1988 | SAM BURCHELL, Sam Burchell writes about antiques and interior design for this magazine.
THE HOUSE rises from a crest in the Hollywood Hills as if it were part of the land itself. With no windows on the entrance facade, it is initially forbidding, then intriguing as the warmth of its visual geometry becomes apparent. Designed by Ricardo Legorreta, who at 56 is Mexico's premier younger architect, the house, like its owner, actor Ricardo Montalban, bridges Mexican and Californian sensibilities.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|