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Ricardo Montalban Foundation

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
The Ricardo Montalban Theatre officially opened three years ago, but there's been scarce cause to celebrate until now. This week the historic Hollywood venue (formerly the Doolittle), which had been underutilized since its ballyhooed opening in May 2004, was finally put to use as intended under its new management -- as a showcase for the best in Latino theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2007 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
The Ricardo Montalban Theatre officially opened three years ago, but there's been scarce cause to celebrate until now. This week the historic Hollywood venue (formerly the Doolittle), which had been underutilized since its ballyhooed opening in May 2004, was finally put to use as intended under its new management -- as a showcase for the best in Latino theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Don Shirley
More than three years after buying the Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood, the Ricardo Montalban Foundation is assembling a team of consultants to program and operate the would-be Latino arts center, which will be renamed after actor Montalban next spring. Diane Rodriguez, co-director of the Mark Taper Forum's Latino Theatre Initiative, will put together the Montalban's initial artistic plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2004
How an L.A. Times article on Latino theater in Los Angeles could omit the work of the nation's top Chicano/ Latino theater troupe and its landmark work, "Chavez Ravine," at the Mark Taper Forum is confounding ("It's Still All Work, No Play," May 23). Culture Clash should be a Los Angeles treasure. If [Ricardo Montalban Foundation head] Jerry Velasco and [playwright-director] Luis Valdez had seen "Chavez Ravine" at the Mark Taper Forum, they would have seen a theater troupe in touch with its audience, a troupe and a theater in touch with their city and the building of that city that is L.A. "Chavez Ravine" was that rare Chicano play that transcended "Latino theater" while maintaining its barrio worldview.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2000
The City Council on Wednesday approved an ambitious plan to convert the 1,021-seat Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood into a Latino-oriented performance center. Under the council plan, the city's Community Redevelopment Agency will buy the theater from owner UCLA for $2.1 million and then convey it to Regent Properties, a real estate and investment firm retained by Ricardo Montalban-Nosotros Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2004 | Don Shirley
The Ricardo Montalban Nosotros Foundation acquired the Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood in 2000 and pledged to turn it into a professional center for Latino performing arts. Four years later, last May 8, the venue was officially renamed the Ricardo Montalban Theatre. But where are the artists? A $125,000 series of play readings briefly occupied the theater in June, after its christening.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2006 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
The 1,200 seats in the Ricardo Montalban Theatre remain empty even though audiences are showing up to witness the first efforts of a group delivering the sort of original Latino programming long anticipated at the underused facility. Starting small, Nosotros American Latino Theatre is using just a portion of the Hollywood hall for its presentation of two new one-act plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2006 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
"Well, I think I've been doing it for 2,000 years now," Ted Neeley says by phone in a warm Texas drawl. "But I have never once walked on a stage and not felt like it was the very first time." Neeley is referring to his title role in the 1973 film "Jesus Christ Superstar" and in the many subsequent theater productions of the seminal Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice rock opera. But now the actor is ready to hang up his flowing robe and crown of thorns.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2005 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
The Spring Street neighborhood around the Los Angeles Theatre Center, in downtown L.A., looks surprisingly springy these days. The area, which remained a dead zone during most of LATC's creative heyday from 1985 to 1991, is bouncing back as more people choose an urban loft life in downtown L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2008 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Two large banners advertising "Virgin Love" still hang on the facade of the Ricardo Montalban Theatre in Hollywood, giving the impression of a successful run for the bawdy musical commedia that opened in October. But the play closed six weeks ago, and the banners mask the trouble brewing at the long-struggling community theater. Behind the facade, internal strife again threatens the future of the Montalban, one of the most high-profile Latino cultural institutions in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2009 | David Ng
Ricardo Montalban was never one to turn up his nose at product endorsements. The Mexico-born Hollywood actor memorably lent his name and face to commercials for Chrysler and Maxwell House. His was the sonorous voice that proclaimed that his favorite brand of coffee was always "good to the last drop." The actor, who is best known for playing Mr. Roarke on "Fantasy Island," passed away in January, but the endorsements haven't stopped. Montalban's name is currently associated with another internationally recognized brand: Nike Sportswear, which recently extended its marketing deal with the Ricardo Montalban Theatre in Hollywood through June 2010.
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