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Rice Cakes

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BUSINESS
January 20, 1998 | MARGARET TAUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With a hiss and a puff of fluffy crumbs, round cakes that resemble popcorn snap out of machines and start down a conveyor belt, on their way to becoming packages of Simply Snacks flavored rice cakes. The crispy snacks have been tumbling off the assembly line at Foodland Industries MN Inc. for the past year and a half, entering a $400-million-a-year industry dominated by giant Quaker Oats.
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NEWS
May 20, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
A few decades ago, gluten-free products mostly meant rice cakes. Today, the category just won't quit. Even industry analysts have been surprised at the strength of the gluten-free claim, said Tom Vierhile, innovation insights director at Datamonitor Consumer, which tracks the introduction of new products into the U.S. market. So far this year, more than 18% of the new food products put into stores make a gluten-free claim, the firm said. That's compared with 11.5% in 2012 and 11.7% in 2011.
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FOOD
March 13, 2002 | Barbara Hansen
You'll recognize Chikara Mochi, a Japanese rice cake shop in Gardena, by the blue noren (curtains) fluttering outside. The delicate little cakes on display inside include four that are used in the Japanese tea ceremony. They are kaki (persimmon), which is tinted orange to resemble the fruit; botan (peony), a white cake with a pink blush; kiku (chrysanthemum), which is pink; and yuki (snowflake), a white cake with the image of a snowflake pressed into the top.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
Frances Hashimoto, one of Little Tokyo's most influential business leaders who fought to preserve the neighborhood's Japanese cultural traditions and who invented the popular fusion dessert known as mochi ice cream, died of lung cancer Sunday at her Pasadena home. She was 69. Hashimoto was the feisty, visionary president of Mikawaya, the 102-year-old, three-generation family business selling traditional Japanese sweet pastries and snacks. At the urging of her widowed mother, she left teaching and took over the family business at age 27, vastly expanding its reach from a single shop in Little Tokyo to four retail stores in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2002 | Patt Morrison, Times Staff Writer
Gray Davis, having wrapped up the Mammon part of the candidate's job, was catching up on the God bits, campaigning in East Oakland at Allen Temple Baptist Church, meeting with black ministers and community activists. Afterward, reporters tossed questions at Davis about allegations by Mark L. Nathanson, a former state coastal commissioner, that the governor egged him on to approve certain coastal projects for potential Davis donors.
SPORTS
January 26, 1988
The new king of sumo wrestling in Japan is Asahifuji, a 27-year-old newcomer who defeated longtime champion Chiyonofuji last Sunday in Tokyo. Wrote Graham Earnshaw of Reuters: "The victor's prizes included the Emperor's Cup, 10,000 rice cakes, a year's supply of gasoline and a vase from the Hungarian Embassy, plus an undisclosed, but large, sum of money donated by major Japanese corporations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2001 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Celebrating Tet, the lunar new year, without banh chung is like Christmas without a tree or Thanksgiving without a turkey. The 6-by-6-inch delicacy, painstakingly stuffed with five layers of sticky rice, mung beans and pork, all wrapped inside banana leaves, is the one dish that most defines the weeklong holiday. And in Westminster, the Hoang Huong Bakery is renowned for its banh chung. Customers often wait in line for more than an hour to buy one, five, even dozens of the cakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran
Customers crowded into the Tan Hoang Huong bakery in Santa Ana several days before the lunar new year. Gifts of candies and dried fruit wrapped in red cellophane lined the walls. And the sweet fragrance of banh chung , rice cakes wrapped in banana leaves and stuffed with mung beans and pork belly, filled the air. Ailinh Nguyen had already picked up nine banh chung that she planned to give to her parents and friends, but realized she wanted one more for herself in time for Tet, the Vietnamese lunar new year.
FOOD
February 17, 1999
Key to Times Style Unless otherwise indicated, make the following assumptions in Times recipes. Butter: unsalted (sweet). Eggs: large. Flour: all-purpose. Fruit and vegetable sizes: Onions and other items are assumed to be medium. Milk: whole. Oil: vegetable oil (canola, peanut, safflower, etc.). Sugar: granulated. Glossary Cellophane noodles: Translucent noodles made from mung bean flour. Available at Asian markets.
NEWS
May 31, 1994 | C.A. WEDLAN
Do luminaries get the munchies? You bet your sweet patootie they do. When the famous are famished they nibble just like the rest of us. Here's a sampling. * Richard Riordan, mayor: cheese and fruit or Bob's Big Boy hamburger * Frederica Von Stade, mezzo-soprano: potato chips (any variety) * Peter Ueberroth, businessman: Brach's Starlite mints and Butter Toffee candy. * Raven-Symone, actress: fruit, granola bars, Oreo cookies, pizza.
FOOD
October 27, 2011 | Linda Burum
It's just before the dinner rush at Huong Giang, a central Vietnamese restaurant in Westminster's Little Saigon, and dozens of dim-sum-like dishes obscure our tabletop. Chopsticks eagerly reach for fat little shrimp-filled dumplings and impossibly tender rice cakes wrapped in banana leaves. We pass around silver dollar-size rice pancakes topped with pork cracklings and nibble on Vietnamese cold cuts swathed in freshly steamed rice noodle sheets as airy as chiffon. These small bites may have the feel of new wave dim sum or the latest Asian-influenced gastropub, but they belong to the legendary cuisine of central Vietnam -- the most sophisticated of the country's three major culinary regions -- whose capital city, Hue, enjoys the cachet of Paris, Rome or Shanghai among Vietnamese food lovers.
FOOD
April 22, 2010
Wild rice cakes with smoked trout Total time: 1 hour, 15 minutes Servings: 4 1 large or two small boiling potatoes, unpeeled (enough for 1 cup mashed) Olive oil 1 onion, chopped (about 2 cups) 3 cloves of garlic, minced (about 1 tablespoon) Salt and pepper 2 cups cooked wild rice 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 tablespoon flour 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg 2 green onions, chopped 1/2 pound smoked trout fillets, flaked 1/4 cup sour cream 1 heaping tablespoon prepared horseradish Juice of half a lemon 4 to 5 dashes Tabasco sauce 1 generous tablespoon fresh dill, chopped, plus more for garnish 1. Place the potatoes in a small pot andadd water to cover.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran
Customers crowded into the Tan Hoang Huong bakery in Santa Ana several days before the lunar new year. Gifts of candies and dried fruit wrapped in red cellophane lined the walls. And the sweet fragrance of banh chung , rice cakes wrapped in banana leaves and stuffed with mung beans and pork belly, filled the air. Ailinh Nguyen had already picked up nine banh chung that she planned to give to her parents and friends, but realized she wanted one more for herself in time for Tet, the Vietnamese lunar new year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2009 | Teresa Watanabe
In a bright, modern home in a Monterey Park neighborhood, three generations of a Japanese American family made way for the new year with an ancient tradition. A hundred pounds of glutinous rice had been soaking since the previous night. In the morning, the rice was drained, steamed and pounded into a soft, sticky mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2002 | MARY McNAMARA
Eleven years ago, the owners of Erewhon Natural Foods Market built the Taj Mahal of health food stores. Since 1968, the store had occupied the corner of Edinburgh and Beverly, and when it moved, the iconic weathered-redwood building left behind remained a hangout for granola heads -- first as the Nowhere Cafe, now as VP Discount Vitamins and Natural Foods. But the new Erewhon, a few blocks west, was something else again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2002 | Patt Morrison, Times Staff Writer
Gray Davis, having wrapped up the Mammon part of the candidate's job, was catching up on the God bits, campaigning in East Oakland at Allen Temple Baptist Church, meeting with black ministers and community activists. Afterward, reporters tossed questions at Davis about allegations by Mark L. Nathanson, a former state coastal commissioner, that the governor egged him on to approve certain coastal projects for potential Davis donors.
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The greatest challenge in eating at All Family Restaurant may be finding it. If you can read Korean, no problem. You go to a mall on Crenshaw Boulevard just south of Olympic Boulevard and look for the shop with a red sign. The name does appear in English on the door, but it's too small to be seen from the parking lot. Then you can relax, because there's no language problem inside this plain little restaurant.
FOOD
August 14, 2002 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The splashy new Koreatown Galleria stands like a beacon signaling the entry to the heart of the Korean community in Los Angeles. This $33-million shopping plaza at Olympic Boulevard and Western Avenue gives perspective to what has been, for the most part, an undefined collection of mom-and-pop businesses along Olympic from Crenshaw Boulevard east to the 110 Freeway. The Galleria captures it all--shops, a market, bakeries and restaurants.
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