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Rice Pudding

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FOOD
February 8, 1996 | ROSE DOSTI
HAYDEN'S RICE PUDDING 1 cup boiling water 1/2 cup rice 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 quart milk 1/4 cup butter 2 eggs 1/2 cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup raisins Cinnamon sugar or nutmeg Bring water, rice and salt to boil in saucepan. Simmer 7 minutes. Add milk and butter. Return to boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, 1 1/4 hours. Beat eggs with sugar and vanilla and add to cooked rice mixture and heat through. Remove from heat and add raisins.
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FOOD
September 15, 1994 | ROSE DOSTI
DEAR SOS: Can you provide the recipe for the glorious rice pudding at the Old World Restaurant in Westwood? It's a dish that I've loved since my freshman year at UCLA in 1983. It seems like a custard as much as a pudding. --BRAD DEAR BRAD: Here's the recipe from the Old World, made with a custard base.
FOOD
August 18, 1994 | ROSE DOSTI
DEAR SOS: The Hotel Bel-Air serves a tortilla soup table-side during lunchtime. Do you think you could get the chef to part with the recipe? --ELIZABETH DEAR ELIZABETH: Hotel Bel-Air executive chef Gary Clauson was happy to provide the recipe. It's served piping hot with fried tortilla strips, avocado, grilled chicken strips, cilantro and shredded Cheddar on the side to add as garnishes.
FOOD
July 14, 1994 | FAYE LEVY
Rice pudding is loved throughout this country. But it's also loved in France, from Provence to Burgundy to Normandy. Home cooks use a time-honored technique that involves baking the rice with milk and butter for three hours. A classic French restaurant formula does it in two: The rice is cooked in milk for an hour, egg yolks are added and whipped egg whites are folded in, and the mixture is baked in a caramel-coated gratin dish for another hour.
FOOD
April 7, 1994 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES FOOD STYLIST; Deane is co-author of "Simply Healthful Cakes" (Chapters Publishing: 1993; $9.95)
Our Indian rice pudding has a pukka (proper) coconut flavor, creamy and rich, and you would never guess it contains only a couple of grams of fat. But if this recipe had been made with canned coconut milk, each serving would contain about 32 grams of fat. We cut the fat by using nonfat milk along with nonfat egg substitute and coconut extract, to get the flavor and consistency without the high fat.
FOOD
March 24, 1994 | ROSE DOSTI
DEAR SOS: What is the recipe for the glorious rice pudding at Old World Restaurant in Westwood? It seems like a custard as much as a pudding. I've loved it since my freshman year at UCLA in 1983. --BRAD DEAR BRAD: You're in luck. Old World Restaurant shared its recipe with you--and us.
FOOD
February 17, 1994 | ROSE DOSTI
DEAR SOS: Some time ago, a reader, Zelma, asked for a zucchini frittata recipe and you replied with a zucchini patty recipe. I believe this is the recipe she's looking for. I've had it for years and it's a family favorite. --MRS. G. W. DEAR MRS. G. W.: You are so kind. We have several recipes, but yours looks easy and sounds good. We added two more eggs to your recipe for a more eggy frittata.
FOOD
December 9, 1993 | ROSE DOSTI
My mother was a fine pilaf cook. Hers was a Balkan-style pilaf, the sort found in Turkey, Greece and Albania, where low-starch, long-grain rice was preferred over starchy short-grain. The true test of "good" pilaf was to have each grain separate, like tiny, glistening pearls. In her mind, there was no excuse for overcooked, mushy rice. Her rice dishes were works of art, concocted carefully to produce some of the most wildly sensual smells in my memory.
FOOD
January 24, 1991 | ROSE DOSTI
Rice pudding was my comfort food as a child. The way my mother saw it, if you had a cold you got rice pudding. And I loved my mother's rice pudding. It was a rather creamy type, not too firm. And it did wonders for body and soul. The scent of sugary rice cooking on the stove for long hours would always signal imminent, supreme comfort. My mother poured the finished rice pudding on a large serving platter, creating a shallow sea of nubby kernels topped with a crisscross pattern of cinnamon spread by pinching the grains between her forefinger and thumb.
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