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FOOD
January 12, 2005 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: Beacon in Culver City serves a very delicious cod with a sweet miso sauce. I can't help but order it, or share it, whenever I am there, and I would love the recipe. Farrel Jane Levy Los Angeles Dear Farrel: Chef Kazuto Matsusaka of Beacon, where the menu is California-Asian, serves this moist, delicately flavored cod with warm green beans in a rice vinegar and oil dressing.
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NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Holiday traffic, gift shopping, partying…. It's a relief to slow down with a good cookbook that reflects an idyllic life on a farm in northern  Japan , where the cooking revolves around food that's grown at home and prepared simply. “ Japanese Farm Food ” by Nancy Singleton Hachishu, who moved from California to Japan and ended up marrying a farmer and living in his ancestral home two hours from Tokyo, is a transporting respite. The book opens with a description of her Japanese farmhouse kitchen, a place of wood posts and beams, filled with her collection of 100-year-old baskets and bowls.
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FOOD
May 29, 2002 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rich mayonnaise or oily vinaigrettes often make coleslaws heavy. But this light Japanese-style coleslaw, made with the aromatic shiso leaf, needs only one teaspoon of oil. Nappa cabbage, green onions and rice vinegar boost the slaw's flavor too. And if you pour the dressing over the vegetables just before serving, the slaw stays crisp. Shiso leaves, sometimes used in sushi, might be called perilla in Japanese and Asian markets. Cover the leaves with plastic wrap and refrigerate for best results.
FOOD
July 1, 2009
Total time: 1 hour, 45 minutes, plus chilling time for the chicken Servings: 6 Note: The degree of heat in the sauce is determined by the amount of tobanjan (hot Chinese miso paste) or la yu (hot Chinese chile oil) you use. You can also omit these seasonings and simply make a ginger sesame sauce. Alternatively, the soy-mirin dipping sauce used for the iced somen noodles with eggplant can also be served with this recipe as a second sauce, in which case you will need deeper serving bowls.
FOOD
December 17, 1987 | DIANA SHAW, Shaw is free-lance writer in Los Angeles.
It takes more than a few hearty holiday meals to spoil my appetite. But that's about all it takes to ruin the effect of the clothes I bought to wear to the season's social events. So, between feasts, I'm stuck trying to satisfy my hunger without stressing my seams. Enter vegetable sushi: crunchy carrots and cucumbers with creamy avocado and tofu, nestled in pungent rice, rolled in crispy-sea-salty nori, and dipped in a tangy sauce. It's one "diet" dish that doesn't smack of deprivation.
FOOD
August 6, 1997 | MARION CUNNINGHAM
There's truth even in the kitchen to the old saw "it's the little things in life that count." These two recipes are good cases in point. Take the Chicken Vinegar Saute. When I came across this old favorite in my file, its simple preparation made it seem like a dish tailored for today. I remembered the vinegar sauce giving a pleasing sparkle to the chicken, but when I made it using red wine vinegar, it was too acidic; the vinegar swamped the flavor of the chicken.
FOOD
April 26, 2000 | MARION CUNNINGHAM
With the addition of toasted cheese sandwiches, this rice would make a good hot supper dish. Or it could be served as a filling cold salad on a warm summer evening. Refried in a little olive oil and topped with some grated cheese, it could be still another pleasing meal. Cunningham's newest book is "Learning to Cook With Marion Cunningham" (Alfred A. Knopf, 1999).
FOOD
January 8, 1987 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: In this column on Oct. 9 you answered a query about calamari steaks. You said they are filleted and tenderized squid. Could you possibly expand on this? I have never seen a squid large enough to make one of the calamari steaks sold in the supermarkets. Are they some kind of special squid, or is the process similar to the one where they make the imitation crab? Many thanks for any additional light you can throw on this subject.
FOOD
January 30, 1992 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Feig had been through the experience of working for somebody else. He'd spent a couple of years as day chef at Ma Maison and taught at the restaurant's cooking school, Ma Cuisine. So in 1987 he opened a catering business of his own. To subsidize it, he started a farm to supply restaurants with the herbs he knew chefs had a hard time finding. Actually, calling Country Fresh Herbs a farm was going a little far at the time--it was just Feig's back yard, planted with herbs, mostly basil.
FOOD
July 23, 2008
  Total time: 20 minutes, plus softening and pickling time Servings: Makes about 2 cups 2 bunches radishes (about 3/4 pound with tops removed) 1 tablespoon plus 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided 1 teaspoon whole mustard seed 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 3/4 cup rice vinegar 1 tablespoon sugar 1. Trim the tops and tails of the radishes and quarter them lengthwise. In a large, nonreactive bowl, toss them with 1 tablespoon kosher salt to coat well.
FOOD
July 23, 2008
  Total time: 20 minutes, plus softening and pickling time Servings: Makes about 2 cups 2 bunches radishes (about 3/4 pound with tops removed) 1 tablespoon plus 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt, divided 1 teaspoon whole mustard seed 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 3/4 cup rice vinegar 1 tablespoon sugar 1. Trim the tops and tails of the radishes and quarter them lengthwise. In a large, nonreactive bowl, toss them with 1 tablespoon kosher salt to coat well.
FOOD
January 12, 2005 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
Dear SOS: Beacon in Culver City serves a very delicious cod with a sweet miso sauce. I can't help but order it, or share it, whenever I am there, and I would love the recipe. Farrel Jane Levy Los Angeles Dear Farrel: Chef Kazuto Matsusaka of Beacon, where the menu is California-Asian, serves this moist, delicately flavored cod with warm green beans in a rice vinegar and oil dressing.
FOOD
May 29, 2002 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rich mayonnaise or oily vinaigrettes often make coleslaws heavy. But this light Japanese-style coleslaw, made with the aromatic shiso leaf, needs only one teaspoon of oil. Nappa cabbage, green onions and rice vinegar boost the slaw's flavor too. And if you pour the dressing over the vegetables just before serving, the slaw stays crisp. Shiso leaves, sometimes used in sushi, might be called perilla in Japanese and Asian markets. Cover the leaves with plastic wrap and refrigerate for best results.
FOOD
May 8, 2002 | CINDY DORN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
DEAR SOS: The best Chinese chicken salad is at Wolfgang Puck's Chinois on Main in Santa Monica. Is it possible to obtain the recipe from Mr. Puck? ALLEN KARDELL Palos Verdes DEAR ALLEN: Anything is possible. Chinois Chicken Salad Active Work and Total Preparation Time: 30 minutes Chinese mustard can be found in the Asian aisle of most supermarkets. CHINESE MUSTARD VINAIGRETTE 1 egg yolk 3 teaspoons Chinese mustard 1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce 3 tablespoons light sesame oil 1/2 cup rice vinegar 3 to 4 tablespoons peanut oil Salt, pepper Blend together the egg yolk, mustard, soy sauce, sesame oil, vinegar, peanut oil and salt and pepper to taste until smooth.
FOOD
April 26, 2000 | MARION CUNNINGHAM
With the addition of toasted cheese sandwiches, this rice would make a good hot supper dish. Or it could be served as a filling cold salad on a warm summer evening. Refried in a little olive oil and topped with some grated cheese, it could be still another pleasing meal. Cunningham's newest book is "Learning to Cook With Marion Cunningham" (Alfred A. Knopf, 1999).
FOOD
August 6, 1997 | MARION CUNNINGHAM
There's truth even in the kitchen to the old saw "it's the little things in life that count." These two recipes are good cases in point. Take the Chicken Vinegar Saute. When I came across this old favorite in my file, its simple preparation made it seem like a dish tailored for today. I remembered the vinegar sauce giving a pleasing sparkle to the chicken, but when I made it using red wine vinegar, it was too acidic; the vinegar swamped the flavor of the chicken.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
Holiday traffic, gift shopping, partying…. It's a relief to slow down with a good cookbook that reflects an idyllic life on a farm in northern  Japan , where the cooking revolves around food that's grown at home and prepared simply. “ Japanese Farm Food ” by Nancy Singleton Hachishu, who moved from California to Japan and ended up marrying a farmer and living in his ancestral home two hours from Tokyo, is a transporting respite. The book opens with a description of her Japanese farmhouse kitchen, a place of wood posts and beams, filled with her collection of 100-year-old baskets and bowls.
FOOD
July 1, 2009
Total time: 1 hour, 45 minutes, plus chilling time for the chicken Servings: 6 Note: The degree of heat in the sauce is determined by the amount of tobanjan (hot Chinese miso paste) or la yu (hot Chinese chile oil) you use. You can also omit these seasonings and simply make a ginger sesame sauce. Alternatively, the soy-mirin dipping sauce used for the iced somen noodles with eggplant can also be served with this recipe as a second sauce, in which case you will need deeper serving bowls.
FOOD
January 30, 1992 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Feig had been through the experience of working for somebody else. He'd spent a couple of years as day chef at Ma Maison and taught at the restaurant's cooking school, Ma Cuisine. So in 1987 he opened a catering business of his own. To subsidize it, he started a farm to supply restaurants with the herbs he knew chefs had a hard time finding. Actually, calling Country Fresh Herbs a farm was going a little far at the time--it was just Feig's back yard, planted with herbs, mostly basil.
FOOD
December 17, 1987 | DIANA SHAW, Shaw is free-lance writer in Los Angeles.
It takes more than a few hearty holiday meals to spoil my appetite. But that's about all it takes to ruin the effect of the clothes I bought to wear to the season's social events. So, between feasts, I'm stuck trying to satisfy my hunger without stressing my seams. Enter vegetable sushi: crunchy carrots and cucumbers with creamy avocado and tofu, nestled in pungent rice, rolled in crispy-sea-salty nori, and dipped in a tangy sauce. It's one "diet" dish that doesn't smack of deprivation.
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