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SCIENCE
March 12, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As early as this year, China could start commercial production of a new breed of genetically engineered rice, scientists said. They are looking to mass produce Xa21 rice, which contains a gene from an African wild rice. The Xa21 strain, developed through publicly funded international research, is resistant to bacterial blight -- one of the most serious crop diseases in Africa and Asia, which can cause devastating yield loss.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Bayer, the second-biggest corn-seed producer in the U.S., detected trace amounts of an unapproved genetically engineered rice variety in commercial U.S. samples, posing a threat to a portion of rice exports. The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration concluded that there were "no human health, food safety or environmental concerns associated with the rice," Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1990 | From Reuters
Former Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita says Japan will be unable to avoid partly opening its rice market in a world looking for freer trade in agriculture, two Japanese newspapers reported Friday. "It would be impractical if Japan had to leave GATT (the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade) to keep its rice import ban," Yomiuri Shimbun quoted Takeshita as saying. Tokyo Shimbun quoted him as saying Japan should encourage rice farmers to raise productivity while liberalizing the rice market.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1988 | LAURIE OCHOA
Most people like it with a lot of raisins in it, if they can face it to begin with. It is perhaps meant for the nursery . . . but that is where we should all return now and then, to simplify ourselves. --M.F.K. Fisher on rice pudding It's hard to believe our lives would be simpler if we only ate more rice pudding, but if it tastes good, what's the harm? Rice pudding may not be man's greatest gastronomic accomplishment, but it is the ultimate comfort food.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1990 | From Reuters
South Korea will not budge from its refusal to open its market to foreign rice and will keep price controls on rice to protect its farmers, an agriculture ministry official said Wednesday. Kim Jong-yong, the ministry's director general for international cooperation, told reporters that Seoul was forced to ask for special concessions to keep its rice market closed. The current round of negotiations under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade aims to liberalize global trade.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Rice is the Japanese culture that has lasted for several thousand years. It is the Japanese people themselves," Tomio Yamamoto, Japan's new agriculture minister, declared as he took over his job. Rice, however, is no longer the culture it once was. Indeed, Japanese are eating less of it every year. Farmers themselves are cutting consumption even faster than city dwellers. Not even 15 years of campaigns to promote rice consumption have halted the decline.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992 | From Associated Press
Foreign Minister Michio Watanabe has urged Japan to begin negotiations on allowing rice imports, news reports said. Watanabe proposed that Japan place tariffs on the imports, however. Watanabe believes that the change in tactics will help stalled international trade talks reach a conclusion, Kyodo News Service and the Japan Broadcasting Corp. (NHK) reported.
NEWS
October 11, 1987 | From Reuters
The worst flooding in Bangladesh in 40 years destroyed 3.4 million tons of rice worth $1.16 billion, Agriculture Minister Mohammed Mahbubuzzaman said Saturday. The floods killed more than 1,600 people by official count.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2005 | From Associated Press
A World Trade Organization appeals panel ruled that Mexico had unfairly imposed anti-dumping tariffs on U.S. rice, rejecting Mexico's argument against a previous ruling. Mexico imposed the tariffs on U.S. white long-grain rice in 2002, claiming that it was being sold in Mexico at unfairly low prices, damaging Mexican producers. U.S. officials raised the issue before the WTO a year later.
NEWS
December 14, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Japan formally agreed early today to end a decades-old ban on imported rice, thereby bringing the world a major step closer to a sweeping accord on trade and giving a quick boost to California agriculture in the bargain. In what he called a "painful, heartbreaking decision," Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa told a pre-dawn news conference that Japan will accept a partial opening of its rice market to help bring a successful conclusion to world trade negotiations under way in Geneva.
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