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Rich And Famous

ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2002
Unlike many theaters in Southern California, South Coast Repertory doesn't go out of its way to attract big-name celebrities to its stages. Still, a number of recognizable faces have appeared at SCR -- before they were well known from TV or film roles. A sampling:
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2002 | Peter Whittle, Special to The Times
Like his contemporary Noel Coward, Cecil Beaton was that peculiarly British 20th century phenomenon, a man from relatively meager social origins who utterly reinvented himself in the image of those he aspired to. Rejecting his middle-class family's timber business, he set about scaling the social heights of British high society in the 1920s.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pick the pocket of any out-of-state tourist visiting Southern California and you'll probably find a checklist that includes the following entries: (1) Go to Disneyland; (2) Check out Grauman's Chinese Theatre; (3) Buy a map to the movie stars' homes. Forbidding hedges and security-gated enclaves have robbed pursuit No. 3 of much of its curb appeal, but the fascination with fabled dwellings of the rich and famous continues.
NEWS
January 31, 2002 | HILLARY JOHNSON
Next time you're at some bleak outlet mall in Camarillo, about to splurge $200 on a pair of gleaming faux-croc Ferragamo loafers, stop and think to yourself: For this same amount of money--this same substantial yet measly $200--I could own an original work by a contemporary artist of unlimited potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2001 | DAN PASQUINI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Marilyn Manson bassist Twiggy Ramirez opens the door to his Los Angeles home to reveal what looks like an opium den as decorated by Jar Jar Binks. In a room where sunlight is smothered by black drapes, he shows off some of the bizarre highlights of the house: a mounted skunk and pheasant; some Seals & Crofts records; and a man he calls his spiritual advisor, a Hare Krishna named George. In the kitchen, Ramirez pulls out a $200 bottle of champagne and says, "Always gotta have the Cristal.
NEWS
May 14, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the last 26 years, George Christy has chronicled "The Great Life" for the Hollywood Reporter, filling his thrice-weekly column with reports from the party front, tidbits of gossip and tales from the movie world's equivalent of high society. No one reads "The Great Life" expecting to find a scoop--or a snide comment. Unlike some columnists in his milieu, Christy is neither bitchy nor mean-spirited in print.
NEWS
May 9, 2001 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She will buy your kids' birthday presents. Field your business calls. Micro-manage your divorce. If you're famous, she'll shelter you from screaming fans. If you have a whim of iron, she'll charter a plane to pick up your puppy--or pay somebody $100 to give you their parking space. Kerri Campos has done all this, and much, much more, as a member of a curious but increasingly growing niche industry known as the personal assistant.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2000 | AMY WALLACE, Amy Wallace, a former Times staff writer, is a senior writer at Los Angeles Magazine
Once, Paul Wasserman was a legendary publicist in Hollywood. The rumpled man everyone knew as "Wasso" handled the media for such musical giants as the Rolling Stones, the Who, U2, Bob Dylan, Tom Petty, Linda Ronstadt and James Taylor, and actors such as Jack Nicholson, Lee Marvin and Dennis Hopper. Now, he's in jail. For nearly 30 years, Wasserman ruled. An old-school strategist who read a dozen newspapers a day, he knew how to defuse the bad press and cultivate the good.
NEWS
July 16, 2000 | SUSAN EMERLING, SALON.COM
Laugh if you like, but Los Angeles is the sort of town where conspicuous displays of wealth are considered compulsory. In bankruptcy proceedings, valid arguments can be made that a new Mercedes and a house in Beverly Hills are essential business assets, without which it would be impossible to keep the Mercedes and the house in Beverly Hills. This is survival of the fittest, taken to a materialistic extreme.
MAGAZINE
October 17, 1999 | LUCRETIA BINGHAM, Lucretia Bingham last wrote about Connecticut for the magazine
Stone ornamentation highlights the doors, the windows, even the drainpipes of the three-story Italianate mansion. A giant lead frog shoots water into a trough that trickles into a reflecting pool. Muscled statues flank the entrance to a grotto hidden deep in a sunken garden. A tiny arched bridge leads the way to a stone Roman barge. Where am I? Not even close to Italy, but just south of Miami, in Coconut Grove.
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