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Rich Feldman

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May 31, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Rich Feldman, like so many other '60s radicals, has found that life has not been what he expected. The Revolution never came. Slowly, one by one, the members of his generation of rebellion drifted away from the cause, slipping into law school or banking, finally disappearing into the pinstripes of yuppiedom. But somehow, Rich Feldman got left behind. And thereby hangs a fascinating tale of a stubborn '60s Marxist who wanted to change the world by mobilizing the working class but who ended up joining the working class instead.
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BUSINESS
August 6, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Feldman was mad as hell, and he decided not to take it anymore. The general manager of KCOP-TV Channel 13 in Los Angeles has grumbled for years about cable networks receiving what he deems unduly positive and excessive media attention in light of relatively low ratings. So when Feldman saw a Daily Variety ad last week touting CNBC's Charles Grodin talk show as "a ratings sensation," he anted up an estimated $3,000 for another full-page ad pointing out that Grodin attracts a 0.
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BUSINESS
August 6, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rick Feldman was mad as hell, and he decided not to take it anymore. The general manager of KCOP-TV Channel 13 in Los Angeles has grumbled for years about cable networks receiving what he deems unduly positive and excessive media attention in light of relatively low ratings. So when Feldman saw a Daily Variety ad last week touting CNBC's Charles Grodin talk show as "a ratings sensation," he anted up an estimated $3,000 for another full-page ad pointing out that Grodin attracts a 0.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1989 | JAMES RISEN, Times Staff Writer
Rich Feldman, like so many other '60s radicals, has found that life has not been what he expected. The Revolution never came. Slowly, one by one, the members of his generation of rebellion drifted away from the cause, slipping into law school or banking, finally disappearing into the pinstripes of yuppiedom. But somehow, Rich Feldman got left behind. And thereby hangs a fascinating tale of a stubborn '60s Marxist who wanted to change the world by mobilizing the working class but who ended up joining the working class instead.
OPINION
March 31, 2007
Re "AWOL in the real drug war," Opinion, March 24 Arianna Huffington is on the money and exposes what this country is all about. Whites would not put up with sending their children to prison on outrageous drug charges. We are long overdue in having a real conversation on race and class as it applies to our criminal justice system. Americans are basically misinformed or lack courage. Whatever the case, we look like a dog chasing its tail. Let us be smart and bring these drugs inside of the law. This will make life better for all of us. CLIFFORD WALLACE THORNTON JR. Hartford, Conn.
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