Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRich Gedman
IN THE NEWS

Rich Gedman

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
June 14, 1987 | THOMAS BOSWELL, Washington Post
As he drags his .179 average to the plate, Rich Gedman hears them. "Hey, Gedman, why don't ya hold out again next year?" As the scoreboard flashes his season totals--no homers and four RBI in mid-June--he hears them. "When are you gonna start earning those millions?" When he chases a passed ball to the screen--and he had five in five games last week--he hears them again. "Just like the World Series, huh?" The Fenway Faithless have found Rich Gedman.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
July 18, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
Gary Lucas cracked open the door. Donnie Moore and Dave Henderson pushed their way through it to the Angels' shame and Boston Red Sox fame, but neither would have made it without Lucas' help. And Lucas knows it. "If I do my job that night, perhaps he's still with us," the former Angels reliever says of Moore, his troubled former teammate, who later shot himself. "I don't know if that's even relative, but it's certainly something I've thought about." Angels fans remember the situation: Oct. 12, 1986, top of the ninth inning at Anaheim Stadium, Game 5 of the American League Championship Series.
Advertisement
SPORTS
June 8, 1990
Boston Red Sox catcher Rich Gedman was traded to the Houston Astros for a player to be named.
SPORTS
November 22, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Catcher Rich Gedman and the Cardinals agreed to a one-year contract worth $150,000, with the possibility of another $200,000 in performance bonuses.
SPORTS
November 30, 1988
The Boston Red Sox signed free agent Rich Gedman to a 1-year contact Tuesday, an agreement that reportedly makes him the highest-paid catcher in the American League. Gedman, who earned $960,000 last season, accepted a contract that reportedly will pay him $1.1 million. Gary Carter of the New York Mets, at $2.3 million, is reportedly the only major league catcher who is paid more.
SPORTS
September 19, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Rich Gedman hit for the cycle, and drove in seven runs, and Wade Boggs had four hits in five at-bats as the Boston Red Sox beat the Toronto Blue Jays, 13-1, Wednesday at Fenway Park. Despite the loss, the Blue Jays remained five games ahead in the East as the second-place New York Yankeeslost at Detroit, 5-2. "If we had a 16-game lead and 17 to play I wouldn't feel comfortable," Toronto Manager Bobby Cox said.
SPORTS
October 18, 1986 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
FIRST BASE Keith Hernandez of the Mets is far and away the best defensive first baseman in the game today, perhaps ever. And before the NL playoffs began, even Astro Manager Hal Lanier called him one of the best clutch hitters in baseball. Bill Buckner, Hernandez's equal at the plate, is so badly hobbled by knee and ankle injuries, he can barely field his position. Don't expect too many unassisted putouts at first. Without the injuries, Buckner would rate a close second.
SPORTS
July 18, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
Gary Lucas cracked open the door. Donnie Moore and Dave Henderson pushed their way through it to the Angels' shame and Boston Red Sox fame, but neither would have made it without Lucas' help. And Lucas knows it. "If I do my job that night, perhaps he's still with us," the former Angels reliever says of Moore, his troubled former teammate, who later shot himself. "I don't know if that's even relative, but it's certainly something I've thought about." Angels fans remember the situation: Oct. 12, 1986, top of the ninth inning at Anaheim Stadium, Game 5 of the American League Championship Series.
SPORTS
November 30, 1988
The Boston Red Sox signed free agent Rich Gedman to a 1-year contact Tuesday, an agreement that reportedly makes him the highest-paid catcher in the American League. Gedman, who earned $960,000 last season, accepted a contract that reportedly will pay him $1.1 million. Gary Carter of the New York Mets, at $2.3 million, is reportedly the only major league catcher who is paid more.
SPORTS
June 14, 1987 | THOMAS BOSWELL, Washington Post
As he drags his .179 average to the plate, Rich Gedman hears them. "Hey, Gedman, why don't ya hold out again next year?" As the scoreboard flashes his season totals--no homers and four RBI in mid-June--he hears them. "When are you gonna start earning those millions?" When he chases a passed ball to the screen--and he had five in five games last week--he hears them again. "Just like the World Series, huh?" The Fenway Faithless have found Rich Gedman.
SPORTS
October 18, 1986 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
FIRST BASE Keith Hernandez of the Mets is far and away the best defensive first baseman in the game today, perhaps ever. And before the NL playoffs began, even Astro Manager Hal Lanier called him one of the best clutch hitters in baseball. Bill Buckner, Hernandez's equal at the plate, is so badly hobbled by knee and ankle injuries, he can barely field his position. Don't expect too many unassisted putouts at first. Without the injuries, Buckner would rate a close second.
SPORTS
September 19, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Rich Gedman hit for the cycle, and drove in seven runs, and Wade Boggs had four hits in five at-bats as the Boston Red Sox beat the Toronto Blue Jays, 13-1, Wednesday at Fenway Park. Despite the loss, the Blue Jays remained five games ahead in the East as the second-place New York Yankeeslost at Detroit, 5-2. "If we had a 16-game lead and 17 to play I wouldn't feel comfortable," Toronto Manager Bobby Cox said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|