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OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By David Wolpe
We know that wealth does not always make people happy, but does it make them kinder? Studies suggest exactly the opposite. Instead of being more magnanimous, the rich are more likely to lie, cheat, steal and in general display less compassion than the poor. And this finding remains consistent even after controlling for gender, ethnicity and spiritual beliefs. A large body of research point to a compassion deficit in the rich that plays out in big and small ways. As reported in Scientific American, for example, drivers of luxury cars cut others off at intersections at a much higher rate than those driving economy cars.
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NATIONAL
April 3, 2014 | By David Horsey
America has seen some impressive winning streaks -- the Chicago Bulls with Michael Jordan, the New York Yankees for half the 20thcentury, Tiger Woods until his wife caught him with his putter on the wrong green -- - but few can surpass the string of wins being racked up by rich people. And now, thanks to the U.S. Supreme Court's conservatives, the super-wealthy can take another victory lap. On Wednesday, in a 5-4 ruling, the highest court in the land took one more big step toward eliminating all the campaign finance laws that have been enacted since the Watergate scandal in the 1970s.
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BUSINESS
August 23, 1990 | From Associated Press
Nearly 28.5% of America's personal wealth is in the hands of 3.3 million people whose holdings exceed the entire gross national product, the Internal Revenue Service reports. The IRS says the richest 1.6% of U.S. adults--those with assets of $500,000 or more--had total holdings of $4.3 trillion and a combined net worth of $3.8 trillion in 1986, the latest year for which figures are available.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2014 | By David Horsey
Especially when it comes to economic policy, too many politicians are motivated by myths more than by facts. A prime example: the myth of the job creators. Republicans, such as Speaker of the House John Boehner, talk of job creators in reverent, worshipful terms. In their vision of how the world works, it is these brave titans of capitalism who, with no help from anyone else, build the companies that create jobs for American workers. To Boehner and his party, anything that inhibits job creators in their endeavors - taxes, environmental laws, financial regulations - is a job killer.
BUSINESS
August 30, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Just in case you were beginning to think rich people were deeply misunderstood and that they feel the pain of those who are less fortunate, here's the world's wealthiest woman, Australian mining tycoon Gina Rinehart, with some helpful advice. "If you're jealous of those with more money, don't just sit there and complain," she said in a magazine piece . "Do something to make more money yourself -- spend less time drinking or smoking and socialising, and more time working. " Yeah, let them eat cake.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2014 | By David Horsey
Especially when it comes to economic policy, too many politicians are motivated by myths more than by facts. A prime example: the myth of the job creators. Republicans, such as Speaker of the House John Boehner, talk of job creators in reverent, worshipful terms. In their vision of how the world works, it is these brave titans of capitalism who, with no help from anyone else, build the companies that create jobs for American workers. To Boehner and his party, anything that inhibits job creators in their endeavors - taxes, environmental laws, financial regulations - is a job killer.
OPINION
October 18, 2013 | By Robert M. Sapolsky
There's a phrase that has haunted America for decades, one fraught with failure: "Breaking the cycle of poverty. " Despite the ongoing efforts of government and a host of private foundations, income inequality continues to grow and the poor are ever more likely to remain poor. Many factors favor the rich getting richer while the poor stagnate. The wealthy benefit from economies of scale, as the best prices and lowest interest rates are more readily available to those who least need them.
OPINION
July 14, 1996
Definition of inflation: Where everyone has too much money except the rich people. FLOYD L. CURTISS Redlands
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1990
There is an old proverb that says, "A liberal is someone who will put your money where his mouth is." I have a suggestion for all of the liberals who for some reason feel that we are not paying enough taxes these days--particularly those they refer to as "rich people" (you know, the friends of Ronald Reagan, etc.). Since most of the liberals I hear saying this are a lot richer than I am (network anchor people, rich Hollywood types, major media types, various rich Democrats such as Teddy Kennedy, etc.)
OPINION
October 31, 2012
Re "Prop. 30 wouldn't drive out the rich," Column, Oct. 28 Michael Hiltzik says that California's millionaires don't move in response to tax increases. He bases his conclusion on a study by a couple of sociologists, not economists, engaged by the state Franchise Tax Board that purports to prove that millionaires don't leave after tax increases. Many of these millionaires either own or manage California businesses and will expand those businesses outside California. In addition, the millionaires will engage in fewer taxable activities, and the projected revenue that Gov. Jerry Brown hopes for will come up short.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Hannah Fry
A man who is accused of opening fire from a Fashion Island parking garage during the height of the Christmas shopping season last year allegedly targeted the center because "rich people" shop there. The testimony came during a preliminary hearing Monday in which Marcos Gurrola, 42, was ordered to stand trial for aggravated assault and shooting at an occupied building. The Garden Grove man is accused of firing 54 shots from a Glock semiautomatic handgun from a parking structure near Macy's at the Newport Beach shopping center last Dec. 15 , the day after the school massacre in Newtown, Conn.
OPINION
October 18, 2013 | By Robert M. Sapolsky
There's a phrase that has haunted America for decades, one fraught with failure: "Breaking the cycle of poverty. " Despite the ongoing efforts of government and a host of private foundations, income inequality continues to grow and the poor are ever more likely to remain poor. Many factors favor the rich getting richer while the poor stagnate. The wealthy benefit from economies of scale, as the best prices and lowest interest rates are more readily available to those who least need them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Lacy Crawford's novel of college application frenzy, “Early Decision,” has plenty of rich people behaving badly. It also has plenty of young people trying to find their way in the fray of deciding the next chapter of their lives. The stories came from her life as a college application counselor, and she talked to us for a 4Moms chat about college applications , and the anxiety of the personal essay - just as the application season heats up. A former high school English teacher, Crawford found that her “brilliant” students had written college essays that were “not very good,” she says.
OPINION
September 8, 2013 | By David Wolpe
We know that wealth does not always make people happy, but does it make them kinder? Studies suggest exactly the opposite. Instead of being more magnanimous, the rich are more likely to lie, cheat, steal and in general display less compassion than the poor. And this finding remains consistent even after controlling for gender, ethnicity and spiritual beliefs. A large body of research point to a compassion deficit in the rich that plays out in big and small ways. As reported in Scientific American, for example, drivers of luxury cars cut others off at intersections at a much higher rate than those driving economy cars.
SCIENCE
August 30, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Whether you're a New Jersey mall rat or a farmer in India, being poor can sap your smarts. In fact, the mental energy required to make do with scarce resources taxes the brain so much that it can perpetuate the cycle of poverty, new research shows. The findings, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, indicate that an urgent need - making rent, getting money for food - tugs at the attention so much that it can reduce the brainpower of anyone who experiences it, regardless of innate intelligence or personality.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2013 | By Daniel Miller, Los Angeles Times
They were planning to spend nearly $500,000 on a home theater. What was an additional $35,000 to show first-run movies? When Ken and Carol Schultz began remodeling their 10,000-square-foot San Diego-area residence, they spared no expense on a screening room. The couple tricked it out with custom-built armchairs with heat and massage functions, and a Runco 3-D-capable projector with a price of about $100,000. But the most unusual feature of the theater is a $35,000 device that offers 24-hour rentals of first-run movies.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2012 | By David Horsey
The richest Americans might find lumps of coal in their stockings on Christmas morning and, if not that, then they can definitely anticipate big hangovers on New Year's Day. The metaphorical coal lumps and hangovers will be thanks to President Obama and Speaker of the House John Boehner, who are either going to strike a deal in the next few days to allow taxes to go up for the wealthy or let it happen automatically when the George W. Bush-era tax...
BUSINESS
September 17, 2012 | By David Lazarus
In case you were wondering, it's a swell time to be a billionaire. But it kind of stinks to be a mere millionaire. Market researcher Wealth-X says the number of people with at least $30 million in ready cash climbed to 187,380 last year but their total wealth fell 1.8% to $25.8 trillion, which is nevertheless still more than the combined economies of America and China. Taking the biggest hit were those with fortunes ranging from $200 million to $499 million. Their ranks fell by about 10% and the size of their wads dropped 11.4%.
OPINION
March 26, 2013
Re "They aren't like the rest of us," Opinion, March 22 That rich people should act in their own self-interest is not surprising. What is unfortunate for our democracy is their extreme degree of political influence. Political leaders are put into office to represent us all. The average voter hasn't the time to brood over many of the finer political issues. We are looking for work, trying to get through school, dealing with family health issues or simply keeping creditors at bay. The rich have more options to mitigate these stresses.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
How much would you pay to live where William Randolph Hearst and Marion Davies called home? How steep is too steep to sleep where John and Jacqueline Kennedy honeymooned? OK, rich kids of Instagram , what would you say to a Beverly Hills manse with a $600,000-a-month lease? And yes, if you can afford it, you can brag: Its listing agent, Jeffrey Hyland of Hilton & Hyland, says the Mediterranean-style house “may be the most expensive lease in the country.” So now we'll see if those tax increases we voted for in November really have chased all the rich people out of California.
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