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Rich Sybert

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998
A goodbye note to Rich Sybert: It looks like character counts after all. STEVE MORSA, Thousand Oaks
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998
A goodbye note to Rich Sybert: It looks like character counts after all. STEVE MORSA, Thousand Oaks
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NEWS
June 7, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't supposed to end this way for Rich Sybert. A handsome Harvard Law School graduate and former top aide to Gov. Pete Wilson, Sybert was once considered one of the GOP's promising young stars. But after three consecutive defeats--two hard-fought congressional contests, then a state Assembly primary last week in which he was trounced by 28-year-old legislative aide Tony Strickland--Sybert says he is through with politics.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't supposed to end this way for Rich Sybert. A photogenic Harvard Law School graduate and former top aide to Gov. Pete Wilson, Sybert was once considered one of the GOP's promising young stars. But after three consecutive defeats--two hard-fought congressional contests, then an Assembly primary last week in which he was trounced by 28-year-old legislative aide Tony Strickland--Sybert says he is through with politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997
In the paper last week, you printed a story about Rich Sybert's announcement not to run for Congress for a third time. Let me be the first Republican to say how glad I am to hear this news. Rich Sybert's views do not represent me or the Republican Party. Over the past four years, he has demonstrated a willingness to alter his views in an attempt to win over all voters. In last year's election, he abandoned his supporters by distancing himself from the Republican Party, its leadership, and our core principles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1994
Three cheers for Rich Sybert (Valley Commentary, June 26.) His analysis of the overwhelming cost of caring for illegal immigrants is right on the nose, especially the cost of illegitimate births among illegals and the cost of bilingual education of the offspring of illegals. The illegals have destroyed the social safety nets that have existed for legal Americans. E.H. BROUDY Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1994
Rich Sybert, Republican candidate for Congress, would use the U. S. Army to fight crime (Valley Commentary, Oct. 9). What next? Should we arm politically reliable civilians to assist the Army? We could call them attaches. No one has used Army troops for permanent general police duties in America since George III. Most true conservatives, myself included, are very distrustful of anyone who would expand federal power, especially federal police power. KENNETH WILKE Calabasas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1995
Howard Cohen's letter (July 2) is incorrect in saying that Rep. Anthony C. Beilenson (D-Woodland Hills) "declines to accept PAC money." He accepts a great deal of it by having it routed through the Democratic state and national committees and then claims he is "pure." Moreover, he seems to have no trouble accepting in-kind contributions and "volunteer" help from special interests with whom he happens to agree. This is just another case of a Washington politician saying one thing and doing another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1994
I was outraged to learn from your March 18 Political Briefing that the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy was paying to educate Rich Sybert on environmental issues. I would think that a member of the conservancy already has a working knowledge of these issues. I do not find comfort in the knowledge that my tax dollars are being spent organizing and publicizing a congressional candidate's formal education on campaign issues. Maybe he should try living in the community he is proposing to represent for a while.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1998 | SCOTT HARRIS
How did you feel when you first heard the news about Rich Sybert? Outraged? Disgusted, perhaps? Did it sadden you that a Harvard-educated lawyer who was nearly elected to Congress--not once, but twice--would stoop so low? Did you find it pathetic he would use his wife as an alibi? Or did you, like me, just laugh out loud? I actually did more than laugh. I found myself remembering, ever so fondly, my own days as a dirty trickster. Yes, I can relate to Rich Sybert.
NEWS
June 7, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't supposed to end this way for Rich Sybert. A handsome Harvard Law School graduate and former top aide to Gov. Pete Wilson, Sybert was once considered one of the GOP's promising young stars. But after three consecutive defeats--two hard-fought congressional contests, then a state Assembly primary last week in which he was trounced by 28-year-old legislative aide Tony Strickland--Sybert says he is through with politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998
Republican hopeful Rich Sybert confessed to knocking down his opponent's signs. He lied about it. He confessed when confronted with the fact that he had been videotaped committing the act. Jeff Bennett, chief deputy in charge of investigations in the district attorney's office, says they will not pursue misdemeanor charges against Sybert. Reason: The office "has concluded they did not have enough evidence." And Mr. Bennett was quoted, according to The Times, because "Dist. Atty. Michael D. Bradbury, a Republican, could not be reached for comment."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1998 | SCOTT HARRIS
How did you feel when you first heard the news about Rich Sybert? Outraged? Disgusted, perhaps? Did it sadden you that a Harvard-educated lawyer who was nearly elected to Congress--not once, but twice--would stoop so low? Did you find it pathetic he would use his wife as an alibi? Or did you, like me, just laugh out loud? I actually did more than laugh. I found myself remembering, ever so fondly, my own days as a dirty trickster. Yes, I can relate to Rich Sybert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
Rosalind McGrath, the only Democrat in the race to replace state Assemblyman Nao Takasugi (R-Oxnard), said Monday she will remain a candidate despite being awarded a fellowship to study in England. "I'm staying in the race; that's all I have to say right now," McGrath said in a brief interview, declining to elaborate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1998
Most people who talk with Rich Sybert come away impressed by the intelligence of this Berkeley- and Harvard-educated lawyer, business executive and candidate for the 37th Assembly District. So how could such a smart guy do such a dumb thing as nighttime prowling to rip down an opponent's campaign signs, then lying about it to the press?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1998 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after admitting he tore down a rival's campaign signs in a series of nocturnal romps, state Assembly candidate Rich Sybert launched a curious counterattack Friday. He charged his opponent, Tony Strickland, with committing the same offense while working for Sybert in 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998
Republican hopeful Rich Sybert confessed to knocking down his opponent's signs. He lied about it. He confessed when confronted with the fact that he had been videotaped committing the act. Jeff Bennett, chief deputy in charge of investigations in the district attorney's office, says they will not pursue misdemeanor charges against Sybert. Reason: The office "has concluded they did not have enough evidence." And Mr. Bennett was quoted, according to The Times, because "Dist. Atty. Michael D. Bradbury, a Republican, could not be reached for comment."
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