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Richard A Bilas

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NEWS
July 14, 1989 | CLAY EVANS, Times Staff Writer
A California energy commissioner told a presidential task force on offshore oil development Thursday that drilling on two controversial California coast sites "may not be necessary" in the near future because there are substantial reserves of onshore oil. Energy Commissioner Richard A. Bilas told the President's Outer Continental Shelf Leasing and Development Task Force that deposits of oil in the state are much larger than those off the coast.
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NEWS
July 14, 1989 | CLAY EVANS, Times Staff Writer
A California energy commissioner told a presidential task force on offshore oil development Thursday that drilling on two controversial California coast sites "may not be necessary" in the near future because there are substantial reserves of onshore oil. Energy Commissioner Richard A. Bilas told the President's Outer Continental Shelf Leasing and Development Task Force that deposits of oil in the state are much larger than those off the coast.
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NEWS
August 8, 1990 | From Times Staff Writer
The California Legislature was told Tuesday that although the state imports no crude oil from the Middle East, it is hardly immune to the economic consequences of Iraq's invasion of Kuwait. Together, Iraq and Kuwait produce 8% of the world's total oil supply--and if this amount is not available, "that's a heck of a big shock to the worldwide market," state Energy Commission member Richard A. Bilas testified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985
Since low-income individuals volunteer for the military Powell would have us believe that we have a "free society defended by the least free." Certainly those with low incomes are less free than those with high incomes. However, does coercion of the young, who as a matter of fact are poorer than the old, make anyone more free? Moreover, no one has to volunteer for a voluntary military. Indeed, those who are today joining the military are actually exercising their freedom to choose on the basis of market wages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1986
My former teacher and friend, James McGill Buchanan, hardly needs me to come to his defense. I feel obliged, however, to respond to the letters (Nov. 11) about him, for they strongly suggest that, in general, people do not have any understanding whatsoever about the discipline called "economics" and that this misunderstanding may in part be due to simplistic reporting on the part of the media. In the first place, this year's Nobel prize was well deserved by Prof. Buchanan. He has spent the better part of the past 40 years fighting the accepted orthodoxy that tells us that government behaves, by and large, like a super individual.
OPINION
September 14, 1986
Jack Margolin (Letters, Aug. 30) referred to economics as "the dismal science" when he offered a criticism of U.S. Nobel laureates who are in agreement that this nation should pursue anti-protectionist policies. Yes, economics to the Jack Margolins of this world may be "dismal," and the letter strongly supports this belief when the writer shows his lack of knowledge about economic matters. To begin with, the national debt and the current deficit are not functions of our trade deficit.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1998 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Pennsylvania multilevel marketing firm accused of running an illegal pyramid scheme to sell electricity distributorships in California's soon-to-be deregulated market agreed Friday to suspend operations until a hearing later this month before the California Public Utilities Commission. At a hearing Friday morning before Commissioner Josiah L. Neeper and a PUC administrative law judge, Boston-Finney Inc. and its president, Christopher S.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State regulators challenged the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Tuesday to look harder for evidence of illegal behavior by power sellers so that FERC can order refunds of some of the record electricity prices Californians paid last summer.
BUSINESS
October 16, 1987 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
California's energy watchdogs, worried about whether the state would benefit fully from the nation's 530-million-barrel Strategic Petroleum Reserve in case of an oil cutoff, are pondering the notion of a separate petroleum reserve for the West Coast. Though some students of the oil industry think California might be better off than the rest of the country if oil supplies from the Middle East are interrupted, a draft report pending before the California Energy Commission says otherwise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Public Utilities Commission granted temporary approval Friday for workers to begin laying track at 60 street crossings for the Blue Line rail connecting Pasadena with downtown Los Angeles. But a key state official warned the tracks might never be used if the PUC doesn't give final approval for a 13.7-mile light rail to cross city streets. About half of the transit system is finished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2002 | NANCY VOGEL and TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of two Republicans on the California Public Utilities Commission resigned Wednesday for what he called health reasons and frustration with policy changes at the powerful agency. Richard A. Bilas, an economist appointed to the PUC by former Gov. Pete Wilson in 1997, will step down nine months before his term ends Dec. 31. His departure creates an opportunity for Gov.
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