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Richard A Burton

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 11 glorious days America's most notorious ham was in hog heaven. Amateur radio hobbyist Richard A. Burton--the only person to ever go to jail for talking on ham frequencies without a license--was back on the airwaves after a 15-year banishment by the Federal Communications Commission. "I'm legal," Burton shouted into his transmitter microphone as ham radio operators across Los Angeles listened in amazement. " . . . KF6GKS is clear." Not quite.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 11 glorious days America's most notorious ham was in hog heaven. Amateur radio hobbyist Richard A. Burton--the only person to ever go to jail for talking on ham frequencies without a license--was back on the airwaves after a 15-year banishment by the Federal Communications Commission. "I'm legal," Burton shouted into his transmitter microphone as ham radio operators across Los Angeles listened in amazement. " . . . KF6GKS is clear." Not quite.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 11 glorious days America's most notorious ham was in hog heaven. Amateur radio hobbyist Richard A. Burton--the only person to ever go to jail for talking on ham frequencies without a license--was back on the airwaves after a 15-year banishment by the Federal Communications Commission. "I'm legal," Burton shouted into his transmitter microphone as ham radio operators across Los Angeles listened in amazement. " . . . KF6GKS is clear." Not quite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 11 glorious days America's most notorious ham was in hog heaven. Amateur radio hobbyist Richard A. Burton--the only person to ever go to jail for talking on ham frequencies without a license--was back on the airwaves after a 15-year banishment by the Federal Communications Commission. "I'm legal," Burton shouted into his transmitter microphone as ham radio operators across Los Angeles listened in amazement. " . . . KF6GKS is clear." Not quite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992
A Harbor City man who in 1984 became the first amateur radio hobbyist to go to prison for transmitting without a license has been convicted again of illegal broadcasting. Richard A. Burton, 48, faces up to eight years in federal prison and $1 million in fines after four guilty verdicts reached Monday by jurors at U.S. District Court in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
October 2, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly midnight, and the argument between two ham radio hobbyists, Richard and Darin, was heating up faster than a transceiver with a short circuit. "Wait till I see you," yelled Darin, of Watts, accusing Richard, of Orange, of interfering with his radio transmissions. "You're gonna eat your words. . . . You're gonna get a taste of South-Central in your face. I swear to God--you haven't the slightest idea what you're dealing with here. You read about it in the news."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only person in the United States ever to be jailed for talking illegally on ham radio was ordered back to federal prison Monday for broadcasting again without a license. Radio hobbyist Richard A. Burton of Harbor City was sentenced to seven months in custody by U.S. District Judge Ronald S.W. Lew after he was convicted by a federal jury of talking on Los Angeles amateur radio frequencies four times last May and July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1992 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Legend has it that Richard A. Burton's problems started at church with Ronald Reagan. By one account, the amateur radio operator made an obscenity-laced shortwave broadcast that was somehow transmitted over the loudspeaker system at the Bel-Air church where the president-elect was attending Sunday services in 1979. By another, Reagan heard a snippet of Burton's raunchy, on-the-air comments when a Hollywood film producer cornered him after the service and played a cassette tape for him.
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