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Richard A Clarke

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March 4, 2002 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cyberspace security often seems reminiscent of the movie "Groundhog Day," in which a TV weatherman played by Bill Murray wakes up and relives the same day over and over. After each massively disruptive software infection or hacking episode, users and computer administrators briefly get security religion, swearing that this time they really will take precautions and get things fixed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2007 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
IT'S hard to know precisely what to make of writers like Richard A. Clarke, which makes his rather tedious new techno-thriller worth a few minutes of rumination. Clarke, you may recall, is a longtime national security official who served presidents Clinton and George W. Bush as special White House advisor for counter-terrorism. He was in that post on Sept.
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NATIONAL
March 25, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
With polls showing most voters unhappy about President Bush's handling of the economy and divided over his course in Iraq, the president's strongest asset in the 2004 campaign has been the unwavering sense among most Americans that he is providing resolute leadership against terrorism. But two days of public testimony before the independent commission investigating the Sept.
BOOKS
April 18, 2004 | James Mann, James Mann, a former Washington and foreign correspondent for The Times, is the author of "The Rise of the Vulcans: The History of Bush's War Cabinet."
Richard CLARKE'S revealing book "Against All Enemies" makes clear that he is perhaps the single most improbable hero American liberals have ever revered. Working inside the U.S. government, Clarke repeatedly urged leaders to set aside or evade the ban on political assassinations overseas. He was a strong believer in the use of U.S. military power.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2004
Blindsided by a controversy over its corporate ties to the publisher of Richard Clarke's book, "60 Minutes" has promised that it will not happen again. So when it reports Sunday on Bob Woodward's book "Plan of Attack," "60 Minutes" will say that publisher Simon & Schuster and CBS are both owned by Viacom. When that wasn't said during the March 21 report on Clarke's "Against All Enemies," published by Simon & Schuster subsidiary Free Press, it provided fuel for Clarke's critics.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2004 | Maura Reynolds and Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writers
For one of the first times in the presidency of George W. Bush, his White House has been forced onto the defensive. And the general atop the battlements is his national security advisor, Condoleezza Rice.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2004
Excerpts from Wednesday's testimony before the commission investigating the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001: Richard Clarke Former counterterrorism advisor under Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush. "To the loved ones of the victims of 9/11, to them who are here in the room, to those who are watching on television, your government failed you. Those entrusted with protecting you failed you and I failed you. We tried hard, but that doesn't matter because we failed.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2004 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's national security advisor Wednesday stepped up her defense of the administration's anti-terrorism efforts, calling two unusual news briefings in which she sought to discredit the president's chief critic.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Most Americans accept Richard Clarke's key criticisms of President Bush's anti-terrorism record, but a majority also thinks that politics influenced the timing of the charges by the former White House aide, a Los Angeles Times poll has found. Nearly three-fifths of those surveyed echoed the contention by Clarke that Bush placed a higher priority on invading Iraq than combating terrorism.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Former counterterrorism advisor Richard Clarke's best-selling book may be a movie. Sony Pictures Entertainment has bought the film rights to "Against All Enemies," Sony Vice Chairwoman Amy Pascal said. In the book, Clarke, a counterterrorism advisor to the last three presidents, charges that the Bush administration gave Iraq priority above Al Qaeda before and after the Sept. 11 attacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2004
Blindsided by a controversy over its corporate ties to the publisher of Richard Clarke's book, "60 Minutes" has promised that it will not happen again. So when it reports Sunday on Bob Woodward's book "Plan of Attack," "60 Minutes" will say that publisher Simon & Schuster and CBS are both owned by Viacom. When that wasn't said during the March 21 report on Clarke's "Against All Enemies," published by Simon & Schuster subsidiary Free Press, it provided fuel for Clarke's critics.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Former counterterrorism advisor Richard Clarke's best-selling book may be a movie. Sony Pictures Entertainment has bought the film rights to "Against All Enemies," Sony Vice Chairwoman Amy Pascal said. In the book, Clarke, a counterterrorism advisor to the last three presidents, charges that the Bush administration gave Iraq priority above Al Qaeda before and after the Sept. 11 attacks.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
Most Americans accept Richard Clarke's key criticisms of President Bush's anti-terrorism record, but a majority also thinks that politics influenced the timing of the charges by the former White House aide, a Los Angeles Times poll has found. Nearly three-fifths of those surveyed echoed the contention by Clarke that Bush placed a higher priority on invading Iraq than combating terrorism.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2004 | Richard Simon and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Key congressional Republicans on Friday called for declassifying the testimony that former White House anti-terrorism chief Richard Clarke delivered behind closed doors to a congressional panel two years ago. GOP leaders contended it would show whether Clarke's testimony in 2002 contradicted his recent public criticism of how the Bush administration dealt with terrorism before Sept. 11.
NATIONAL
March 26, 2004 | Maura Reynolds and Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writers
For one of the first times in the presidency of George W. Bush, his White House has been forced onto the defensive. And the general atop the battlements is his national security advisor, Condoleezza Rice.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2004
Excerpts from Wednesday's testimony before the commission investigating the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001: Richard Clarke Former counterterrorism advisor under Presidents Clinton and George W. Bush. "To the loved ones of the victims of 9/11, to them who are here in the room, to those who are watching on television, your government failed you. Those entrusted with protecting you failed you and I failed you. We tried hard, but that doesn't matter because we failed.
NATIONAL
March 27, 2004 | Richard Simon and Greg Miller, Times Staff Writers
Key congressional Republicans on Friday called for declassifying the testimony that former White House anti-terrorism chief Richard Clarke delivered behind closed doors to a congressional panel two years ago. GOP leaders contended it would show whether Clarke's testimony in 2002 contradicted his recent public criticism of how the Bush administration dealt with terrorism before Sept. 11.
NATIONAL
March 23, 2004 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
In his 30 years as a master Washington bureaucrat, Richard Clarke learned to get the job done, no matter what it took -- and no matter whom it annoyed. If Clarke needed money for a program, he wouldn't hesitate to fish it out of someone else's budget. If he wanted action from a military officer, he'd call the officer in the field, ignoring the Pentagon's chain of command. "Government is designed not to work," he would tell subordinates. "Our job is to make it work anyway."
NATIONAL
March 25, 2004 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's national security advisor Wednesday stepped up her defense of the administration's anti-terrorism efforts, calling two unusual news briefings in which she sought to discredit the president's chief critic.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
With polls showing most voters unhappy about President Bush's handling of the economy and divided over his course in Iraq, the president's strongest asset in the 2004 campaign has been the unwavering sense among most Americans that he is providing resolute leadership against terrorism. But two days of public testimony before the independent commission investigating the Sept.
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