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Richard A Serrano

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991
A Times reporter who wrote an article detailing a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King has been subpoenaed to appear next Thursday before the judge hearing the case. The subpoena, signed by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins, was served Wednesday night on Times staff writer Richard A. Serrano. The judge had told a court hearing earlier that he wanted to know how Serrano obtained the document.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
If one ever needed proof that we live in a warrior culture, look no further than those who have falsely claimed military experience, from two-bit conmen to politicians and corporate leaders adding undeserved gravitas to their resumes. It is an attempt to steal glory, a recognition that much of the American public holds a special regard for those who have served. As Richard A. Serrano explores in his short, entertaining "Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery that Outlived the Civil War," this kind of military fraud is nothing new. In the economic dark days of the Great Depression, "veterans" discovered that a few well-placed lies about serving in the Civil War, backed by a supporting letter from a bamboozled politician, could land a veteran's pension from the government.
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NEWS
June 1, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing down from a threat to impose daily $1,500 fines on a Times reporter until he divulges where he got confidential Los Angeles Police Department records, the judge overseeing the Rodney G. King beating case said Friday that he will demand only a single $1,500 sanction. Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins ordered reporter Richard A.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano last wrote for the magazine about convicted spy Christopher Boyce.
Once a month Quran Bilal drives north out of Baton Rouge, La., in her black Nissan, a car so old she cannot remember its year, only that she paid $700 for it used and that the odometer has now turned 148,000 clicks. A side window is broken and the air-conditioning blows hot. Bilal endures it because this is the only way she can visit her son, Sgt. Hasan Akbar, her eldest, who is confined to a military brig at Ft. Knox, Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge overseeing the case of four police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney G. King said Wednesday that newly published details from a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the incident are "distractions," but will not jeopardize a fair trial. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins also ordered a Times reporter who wrote the Tuesday article about the police report to appear in court next Thursday and reveal how he obtained the document.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | LIANNE HART and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history, a man crashed his pickup truck into a cafeteria crowded with lunchtime patrons here Wednesday afternoon and began firing rapidly and indiscriminately with a semiautomatic pistol, killing 22 people. The gunman later was found dead of a gunshot wound in a restaurant restroom, police said. The massacre resulted in injuries to 20 others, many of them listed in "very critical condition."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
If one ever needed proof that we live in a warrior culture, look no further than those who have falsely claimed military experience, from two-bit conmen to politicians and corporate leaders adding undeserved gravitas to their resumes. It is an attempt to steal glory, a recognition that much of the American public holds a special regard for those who have served. As Richard A. Serrano explores in his short, entertaining "Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery that Outlived the Civil War," this kind of military fraud is nothing new. In the economic dark days of the Great Depression, "veterans" discovered that a few well-placed lies about serving in the Civil War, backed by a supporting letter from a bamboozled politician, could land a veteran's pension from the government.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano last wrote for the magazine about convicted spy Christopher Boyce.
Once a month Quran Bilal drives north out of Baton Rouge, La., in her black Nissan, a car so old she cannot remember its year, only that she paid $700 for it used and that the odometer has now turned 148,000 clicks. A side window is broken and the air-conditioning blows hot. Bilal endures it because this is the only way she can visit her son, Sgt. Hasan Akbar, her eldest, who is confined to a military brig at Ft. Knox, Ky.
WORLD
May 3, 2011 | Bob Drogin and Christi Parsons and Ken Dilanian
The nail-biting moment, the period when absolute disaster loomed, came at the very start. About two dozen Navy SEALs and other U.S. commandos were supposed to rope down into a Pakistani residential compound from a pair of specially modified Black Hawk helicopters in the predawn hours Monday, race into two buildings, and capture or kill Osama bin Laden. One chopper stalled as it hovered between the compound's high walls, unable to sustain its lift, and thudded into the dirt. Half a world away in the White House Situation Room, the president and his war council crowded around a table covered with briefing papers and keyboards and watched nervously as video feeds streamed in. The special forces team needed a rescue chopper.
OPINION
February 2, 1992
The subhead (Jan. 21) to staff writer Richard A. Serrano's article concerning the Los Angeles Police Academy post-Watts riot graduating class of recruits of 1965 declares "The academy's graduates in 1965 had to rebuild the department's image after the Watts riots." I was the commanding officer of the Los Angeles Police Academy from 1962 to mid-1966. The graduating recruits were under no obligation to rebuild the department's image since we did not believe it had been tarnished.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing down from a threat to impose daily $1,500 fines on a Times reporter until he divulges where he got confidential Los Angeles Police Department records, the judge overseeing the Rodney G. King beating case said Friday that he will demand only a single $1,500 sanction. Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins ordered reporter Richard A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991
A Times reporter who wrote an article detailing a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King has been subpoenaed to appear next Thursday before the judge hearing the case. The subpoena, signed by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins, was served Wednesday night on Times staff writer Richard A. Serrano. The judge had told a court hearing earlier that he wanted to know how Serrano obtained the document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge overseeing the case of four police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney G. King said Wednesday that newly published details from a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the incident are "distractions," but will not jeopardize a fair trial. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins also ordered a Times reporter who wrote the Tuesday article about the police report to appear in court next Thursday and reveal how he obtained the document.
NEWS
January 13, 1993
Television anchor Chris Harris and Los Angeles Times reporter Richard A. Serrano have been named broadcast and print journalist of the year by the Greater Los Angeles Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. Linda Ellerbee will be the keynote at the annual awards banquet Jan. 21, and Warren Olney will serve as the master of ceremonies. The banquet will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency in Los Angeles.
MAGAZINE
October 6, 2002
The piece by Richard A. Serrano ("Poignant Protest," Sept. 15) about the ill-treatment of the mothers and wives of black servicemen killed in Europe in World War I was an interesting revelation of an all-but-forgotten incident subsequent to an all-but-forgotten war in an all-but-forgotten era. But the article was notable for its omissions as much as its revelations. Although Serrano pointed out that "most of the black soldiers and sailors had worked as support staff" and that "they were not felled by enemy bullets," he neglected to mention that thousands of black Americans were assigned as combat infantrymen and aviators under the French flag and that many were wounded and died under enemy fire, earning France's highest decorations for their valor.
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