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Richard A Serrano

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991
A Times reporter who wrote an article detailing a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King has been subpoenaed to appear next Thursday before the judge hearing the case. The subpoena, signed by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins, was served Wednesday night on Times staff writer Richard A. Serrano. The judge had told a court hearing earlier that he wanted to know how Serrano obtained the document.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
If one ever needed proof that we live in a warrior culture, look no further than those who have falsely claimed military experience, from two-bit conmen to politicians and corporate leaders adding undeserved gravitas to their resumes. It is an attempt to steal glory, a recognition that much of the American public holds a special regard for those who have served. As Richard A. Serrano explores in his short, entertaining "Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery that Outlived the Civil War," this kind of military fraud is nothing new. In the economic dark days of the Great Depression, "veterans" discovered that a few well-placed lies about serving in the Civil War, backed by a supporting letter from a bamboozled politician, could land a veteran's pension from the government.
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NEWS
June 1, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing down from a threat to impose daily $1,500 fines on a Times reporter until he divulges where he got confidential Los Angeles Police Department records, the judge overseeing the Rodney G. King beating case said Friday that he will demand only a single $1,500 sanction. Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins ordered reporter Richard A.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano last wrote for the magazine about convicted spy Christopher Boyce.
Once a month Quran Bilal drives north out of Baton Rouge, La., in her black Nissan, a car so old she cannot remember its year, only that she paid $700 for it used and that the odometer has now turned 148,000 clicks. A side window is broken and the air-conditioning blows hot. Bilal endures it because this is the only way she can visit her son, Sgt. Hasan Akbar, her eldest, who is confined to a military brig at Ft. Knox, Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge overseeing the case of four police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney G. King said Wednesday that newly published details from a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the incident are "distractions," but will not jeopardize a fair trial. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins also ordered a Times reporter who wrote the Tuesday article about the police report to appear in court next Thursday and reveal how he obtained the document.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | LIANNE HART and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history, a man crashed his pickup truck into a cafeteria crowded with lunchtime patrons here Wednesday afternoon and began firing rapidly and indiscriminately with a semiautomatic pistol, killing 22 people. The gunman later was found dead of a gunshot wound in a restaurant restroom, police said. The massacre resulted in injuries to 20 others, many of them listed in "very critical condition."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
If one ever needed proof that we live in a warrior culture, look no further than those who have falsely claimed military experience, from two-bit conmen to politicians and corporate leaders adding undeserved gravitas to their resumes. It is an attempt to steal glory, a recognition that much of the American public holds a special regard for those who have served. As Richard A. Serrano explores in his short, entertaining "Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery that Outlived the Civil War," this kind of military fraud is nothing new. In the economic dark days of the Great Depression, "veterans" discovered that a few well-placed lies about serving in the Civil War, backed by a supporting letter from a bamboozled politician, could land a veteran's pension from the government.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano last wrote for the magazine about convicted spy Christopher Boyce.
Once a month Quran Bilal drives north out of Baton Rouge, La., in her black Nissan, a car so old she cannot remember its year, only that she paid $700 for it used and that the odometer has now turned 148,000 clicks. A side window is broken and the air-conditioning blows hot. Bilal endures it because this is the only way she can visit her son, Sgt. Hasan Akbar, her eldest, who is confined to a military brig at Ft. Knox, Ky.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2007 | David Zucchino, Maura Reynolds and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Gunfire erupted on the Virginia Tech campus Monday in the Blue Ridge Mountains, killing at least 32 people in a dorm and an academic building, in attacks more than two hours apart. A gunman took his life after the second incident, police said. The attacks -- the worst such incident in modern U.S. history -- raised questions about campus security officials' response to the first shootings, in which two people were killed at the West Ambler Johnston dormitory at 7:15 a.m.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2010 | By Brian Bennett, Tribune Washington Bureau
As the U.S. ratchets up security on cargo packages and digs deeper into the plot to send bombs from Yemen, officials are concerned that a number of high-ranking members of Al Qaeda in Yemen were released from the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to a Saudi rehabilitation program for militants. The No. 2 leader for the group in Yemen is Saudi national Said Shihri, who was captured by the U.S. in Afghanistan in 2001 and released from Guantanamo in 2007 to the Saudi program. He was featured in a 2009 video announcing the merger of the Saudi Arabian and Yemeni branches of Al Qaeda.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing down from a threat to impose daily $1,500 fines on a Times reporter until he divulges where he got confidential Los Angeles Police Department records, the judge overseeing the Rodney G. King beating case said Friday that he will demand only a single $1,500 sanction. Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins ordered reporter Richard A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991
A Times reporter who wrote an article detailing a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King has been subpoenaed to appear next Thursday before the judge hearing the case. The subpoena, signed by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins, was served Wednesday night on Times staff writer Richard A. Serrano. The judge had told a court hearing earlier that he wanted to know how Serrano obtained the document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge overseeing the case of four police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney G. King said Wednesday that newly published details from a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the incident are "distractions," but will not jeopardize a fair trial. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins also ordered a Times reporter who wrote the Tuesday article about the police report to appear in court next Thursday and reveal how he obtained the document.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency is the size of a small town, with more than 30,000 employees and as much variety. There are blue-haired iconoclasts who work in their socks, buttoned-down military types and pale-faced introverts who avoid eye contact in the hallways. On the surface, at least, Edward Snowden was hardly unusual at America's largest and most powerful intelligence agency. A self-taught computer whiz who wanted to travel the world, Snowden seemed a perfect fit for a secretive organization that spies on communications from foreign terrorism suspects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, Jessica Garrison and Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
At Olympic High, Santa Monica's alternative school for students who have struggled in traditional programs, inappropriate behavior is not uncommon. But what a veteran English teacher saw on the computer screen of a student named John Zawahri stopped him cold. The solitary teen who regularly ditched class was surfing the Internet for assault weapons, the teacher recalled Monday. Alarmed, he sent Zawahri to the principal's office. Within days, the police were involved and Zawahri was admitted to UCLA's psychiatric ward.
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