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Richard A Serrano

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991
A Times reporter who wrote an article detailing a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King has been subpoenaed to appear next Thursday before the judge hearing the case. The subpoena, signed by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins, was served Wednesday night on Times staff writer Richard A. Serrano. The judge had told a court hearing earlier that he wanted to know how Serrano obtained the document.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
If one ever needed proof that we live in a warrior culture, look no further than those who have falsely claimed military experience, from two-bit conmen to politicians and corporate leaders adding undeserved gravitas to their resumes. It is an attempt to steal glory, a recognition that much of the American public holds a special regard for those who have served. As Richard A. Serrano explores in his short, entertaining "Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery that Outlived the Civil War," this kind of military fraud is nothing new. In the economic dark days of the Great Depression, "veterans" discovered that a few well-placed lies about serving in the Civil War, backed by a supporting letter from a bamboozled politician, could land a veteran's pension from the government.
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NEWS
June 1, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing down from a threat to impose daily $1,500 fines on a Times reporter until he divulges where he got confidential Los Angeles Police Department records, the judge overseeing the Rodney G. King beating case said Friday that he will demand only a single $1,500 sanction. Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins ordered reporter Richard A.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano last wrote for the magazine about convicted spy Christopher Boyce.
Once a month Quran Bilal drives north out of Baton Rouge, La., in her black Nissan, a car so old she cannot remember its year, only that she paid $700 for it used and that the odometer has now turned 148,000 clicks. A side window is broken and the air-conditioning blows hot. Bilal endures it because this is the only way she can visit her son, Sgt. Hasan Akbar, her eldest, who is confined to a military brig at Ft. Knox, Ky.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge overseeing the case of four police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney G. King said Wednesday that newly published details from a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the incident are "distractions," but will not jeopardize a fair trial. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins also ordered a Times reporter who wrote the Tuesday article about the police report to appear in court next Thursday and reveal how he obtained the document.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | LIANNE HART and TRACY WOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history, a man crashed his pickup truck into a cafeteria crowded with lunchtime patrons here Wednesday afternoon and began firing rapidly and indiscriminately with a semiautomatic pistol, killing 22 people. The gunman later was found dead of a gunshot wound in a restaurant restroom, police said. The massacre resulted in injuries to 20 others, many of them listed in "very critical condition."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Scott Martelle
If one ever needed proof that we live in a warrior culture, look no further than those who have falsely claimed military experience, from two-bit conmen to politicians and corporate leaders adding undeserved gravitas to their resumes. It is an attempt to steal glory, a recognition that much of the American public holds a special regard for those who have served. As Richard A. Serrano explores in his short, entertaining "Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery that Outlived the Civil War," this kind of military fraud is nothing new. In the economic dark days of the Great Depression, "veterans" discovered that a few well-placed lies about serving in the Civil War, backed by a supporting letter from a bamboozled politician, could land a veteran's pension from the government.
MAGAZINE
August 3, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Richard A. Serrano last wrote for the magazine about convicted spy Christopher Boyce.
Once a month Quran Bilal drives north out of Baton Rouge, La., in her black Nissan, a car so old she cannot remember its year, only that she paid $700 for it used and that the odometer has now turned 148,000 clicks. A side window is broken and the air-conditioning blows hot. Bilal endures it because this is the only way she can visit her son, Sgt. Hasan Akbar, her eldest, who is confined to a military brig at Ft. Knox, Ky.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2007 | David Zucchino, Maura Reynolds and Stephen Braun, Times Staff Writers
Gunfire erupted on the Virginia Tech campus Monday in the Blue Ridge Mountains, killing at least 32 people in a dorm and an academic building, in attacks more than two hours apart. A gunman took his life after the second incident, police said. The attacks -- the worst such incident in modern U.S. history -- raised questions about campus security officials' response to the first shootings, in which two people were killed at the West Ambler Johnston dormitory at 7:15 a.m.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2011 | By Kim Murphy and Seema Mehta, reporting from Tucson
Arizona Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' "Congress on Your Corner" event started much like dozens of her previous meetings with constituents: in a supermarket parking lot with two dozen people assembled. Only this time, a gunman stepped forward. The shooting Saturday morning was so fast that there was barely time for people to scream before they fell, witnesses said. When it was over, six were dead and 12 were wounded, including Giffords, who was shot in the head. The suspected gunman was identified by police as 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner.
NEWS
June 1, 1991 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backing down from a threat to impose daily $1,500 fines on a Times reporter until he divulges where he got confidential Los Angeles Police Department records, the judge overseeing the Rodney G. King beating case said Friday that he will demand only a single $1,500 sanction. Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins ordered reporter Richard A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1991
A Times reporter who wrote an article detailing a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the officers indicted in the beating of Rodney G. King has been subpoenaed to appear next Thursday before the judge hearing the case. The subpoena, signed by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins, was served Wednesday night on Times staff writer Richard A. Serrano. The judge had told a court hearing earlier that he wanted to know how Serrano obtained the document.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1991 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge overseeing the case of four police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney G. King said Wednesday that newly published details from a confidential Los Angeles Police Department report on the incident are "distractions," but will not jeopardize a fair trial. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Bernard J. Kamins also ordered a Times reporter who wrote the Tuesday article about the police report to appear in court next Thursday and reveal how he obtained the document.
OPINION
February 2, 1992
The subhead (Jan. 21) to staff writer Richard A. Serrano's article concerning the Los Angeles Police Academy post-Watts riot graduating class of recruits of 1965 declares "The academy's graduates in 1965 had to rebuild the department's image after the Watts riots." I was the commanding officer of the Los Angeles Police Academy from 1962 to mid-1966. The graduating recruits were under no obligation to rebuild the department's image since we did not believe it had been tarnished.
NATIONAL
November 18, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams and Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
A New York federal jury acquitted alleged Al Qaeda accomplice Ahmed Khalfan Ghailani on Wednesday of all major terrorism charges in the 1998 suicide bombings of two U.S. embassies in Africa that killed 224 people, including 12 Americans. In the first trial of a former Guantanamo Bay prisoner in civilian court, the Tanzanian was convicted of one count of conspiracy to damage or destroy U.S. property but cleared of 276 counts of murder and attempted murder. The government said it would seek the maximum sentence of life without parole on the conspiracy count.
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