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July 2, 1995 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
It's Chekhov all over again, as Richard Alfieri's "The Sisters" revisits literature's most famous sibling trio. "It is an homage," acknowledges Alfieri, whose contemporary drama has its world premiere July 16 at the Pasadena Playhouse. "Chekhov's plays are filled with situations and events, but they're driven by character--so deeply etched they leave an indelible impression."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By David Ng
Leslie Caron has danced with some of Hollywood's greatest performers, including Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire. It's been years since the French film legend has danced on the big screen, but Caron, who starred in "An American in Paris" and "Gigi," will take to the dance floor again this fall in a production of "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks" at the Laguna Playhouse. Caron will play the role of Lily Harrison, a retired woman who hires a dance instructor to give her private lessons. "Six Dance Lessons" is scheduled to run at Laguna Dec. 7-29, with preview performances beginning Nov. 26. The two-person play, written by Richard Alfieri, debuted in 2001 at the Geffen Playhouse with Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By David Ng
Leslie Caron has danced with some of Hollywood's greatest performers, including Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire. It's been years since the French film legend has danced on the big screen, but Caron, who starred in "An American in Paris" and "Gigi," will take to the dance floor again this fall in a production of "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks" at the Laguna Playhouse. Caron will play the role of Lily Harrison, a retired woman who hires a dance instructor to give her private lessons. "Six Dance Lessons" is scheduled to run at Laguna Dec. 7-29, with preview performances beginning Nov. 26. The two-person play, written by Richard Alfieri, debuted in 2001 at the Geffen Playhouse with Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In "The Sisters," the new play at the Pasadena Playhouse, Richard Alfieri has updated Chekhov's "Three Sisters" to present-day Manhattan. He's updated it to the point where Masha, now Marcia, sneeringly refers to her sister-in-law, Nancy, as "that low-life bitch." And that's one of her milder phrases. So much for Chekhov's delicacy, his aversion to cheap dramatics.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
In "The Sisters," the new play at the Pasadena Playhouse, Richard Alfieri has updated Chekhov's "Three Sisters" to present-day Manhattan. He's updated it to the point where Masha, now Marcia, sneeringly refers to her sister-in-law, Nancy, as "that low-life bitch." And that's one of her milder phrases. So much for Chekhov's delicacy, his aversion to cheap dramatics.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | Lynne Heffley
This 1988 TV film is that rare pleasure--a family film of maturity and substance. Based on Doris Orgel's book "Devil in Vienna," Richard Alfieri's sensitive teleplay chronicles a friendship between two 13-year-old girls--one Jewish (Jenny Lewis), one Catholic (Kamie Harper)--that endures through Germany's annexation of Austria in 1938.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2001
A special gala benefit performance of Richard Alfieri's "Six Dance Lessons in Six Weeks," starring Uta Hagen and David Hyde Pierce, will be presented as a tribute to Jack Lemmon at 7:30 p.m. July 10 at the Geffen Playhouse, 10886 Le Conte Ave., Westwood. Featuring a post-performance reception, the event will benefit the Actors' Fund of America, the HB Playwright's Foundation and the Geffen Playhouse. Tickets are $100, $150 and $250. (323) 933-9266, Ext. 54.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2008
RE "The Strike's Winners, Losers" [by Patrick Goldstein, Feb. 12]: Two of Goldstein's chosen "winners" are actually big losers: (1) Jay Leno. He betrayed his longtime writing staff by doing scab writing of his monologues and prolonged the strike by alleviating the network's pain. (2) Directors Guild of America leadership. They helped create rather than alleviate the impasse between the conglomerates and the Writers Guild. Nick Counter of the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers would not have walked away from the WGA bargaining table had he not known that the always-management-friendly DGA would rush to the table to take the WGA's place.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2001
* The traveling survey "Winslow Homer and the Critics: Forging a National Art in the 1870s," runs June 10-Sept. 9 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., L.A. $5-$15. (323) 857-6000. * "The Body of Bourne," the world premiere of John Belluso's play about influential intellectual Randolph Bourne, plays June 7-July 15 at the Mark Taper Forum, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown L.A. $30-$44. (213) 628-2772.
NEWS
October 27, 1985
Your story on Westwood Development (Times, Oct. 17) almost made it sound as if Zev Yaroslavsky were doing Westwood residents a favor by supporting hardship exemptions to developers wishing to bypass the recent building moratorium in Westwood's North Village. The truth of the matter is, Mr. Yaroslavsky has consistently sided with the developers against the interests of his constituents. As buildings in the North Village began tumbling en masse a few months ago, Mr. Yaroslavsky made it very clear that he would not support a moratorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1995 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
It's Chekhov all over again, as Richard Alfieri's "The Sisters" revisits literature's most famous sibling trio. "It is an homage," acknowledges Alfieri, whose contemporary drama has its world premiere July 16 at the Pasadena Playhouse. "Chekhov's plays are filled with situations and events, but they're driven by character--so deeply etched they leave an indelible impression."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2006 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
A pompous, overwrought and itchingly claustrophobic psychodrama, "The Sisters" was adapted by Richard Alfieri from his own play, which itself was "suggested," whatever that means, by Chekhov's play of almost the same name. The movie transposes four morose siblings from early 20th century podunk Russia to a contemporary Manhattan college campus (because of, you know, the parallels), but instead of having them long for Moscow, the writer sets them pining for Charleston, S.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
A cad who strings along a number of women, exploiting them for monetary as well as sexual favors while pretending that each is his one and only, is the sort of subject who's irresistible to TV-movie makers. You can almost hear the network executives thinking: Men will be amused by the guy's audacity, while women will be gratified by his inevitable comeuppance. But the subject brings with him an inherent problem that hasn't been resolved in "Addicted to His Love" (tonight at 9 p.m.
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