Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Armour
IN THE NEWS

Richard Armour

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Shake and shake The catsup bottle. None will come, And then a lot'll. Richard Armour, the prolific poet, satirist, teacher and wizard of whimsy who wrote the above doggerel and thousands of other pieces of light verse and prose, much to the delight of several generations of readers, died Tuesday. Armour was 82 and died in a Claremont convalescent home. He had been afflicted for some time with Parkinson's disease.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
March 19, 1989
Rushdie's words are Challenged hotly, While Armour's rhymes Are certainly notly. MILE WELDS SANTA ANA
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1988 | BRYAN STYBLE
Like Robert Frost, satirist Richard Armour dismisses free verse, likening it to playing tennis without a net. By any standard, including that set by Frost, Armour ranks as a remarkable talent. Since 1935, the Claremont author and educator has published more than 10,000 pieces of the sort of poetry most beholden to the mechanical considerations valued by Frost: light verse. More incredibly, this prolific output wasn't even the path by which he achieved his greatest fame.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1989
How sad that Richard Armour has passed away. We loved him. He is missed already. Uncle Alistair, our family scribe, wrote this tribute: We loved him immensely. We loved him intensely. That says it I think And keeps it condensely. DARRELL J. ALLAN Los Angeles
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | BRYAN STYBLE
By any standard, including that set by Frost, Armour ranks as a remarkable talent. Since 1935, the Claremont author and educator has published more than 10,000 pieces of the sort of poetry most beholden to the mechanical considerations valued by Frost: light verse. More incredibly, this prolific output wasn't even the path by which he achieved his greatest fame. Inspired principally by Jonathan Swift, Armour developed his approach to prose with his "It All Started With" books in the 1950s.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | Jack Smith
In writing the other day about kittens, I quoted an eternal truth as expressed in verse by Ogden Nash: The trouble with a kitten is THAT Eventually it becomes a CAT That attribution has provoked a literary footnote from attorney John Hamilton Scott: "It is said that Jeremiah Clarke died of despair because his best Trumpet Voluntary was constantly attributed to Henry Purcell.
BOOKS
March 19, 1989
Regarding the recent passing of whimsical poet Richard Armour (Los Angeles Times, Part 1, March 1): Poet Richard Armour (sigh!) Wrote doggerel's magnum opus, Now that he's left for places high, I hope-us we can cope-us. ED HYSAR RESEDA
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1989
How sad that Richard Armour has passed away. We loved him. He is missed already. Uncle Alistair, our family scribe, wrote this tribute: We loved him immensely. We loved him intensely. That says it I think And keeps it condensely. DARRELL J. ALLAN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2002
Wallace Markfield, 75, an author of satirical novels such as "To an Early Grave" and "Teitlebaum's Window," died May 24 in Roslyn, N.Y., of complications from a heart attack. He made his literary debut with the 1964 novel "To an Early Grave," which chronicles the misadventures of a group of friends headed for the funeral of a second-rate writer named Leslie Braverman. It was made into a 1968 movie directed by Sidney Lumet called "Bye Bye Braverman" which starred George Segal and Jack Warden.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Shake and shake The catsup bottle. None will come, And then a lot'll. Richard Armour, the prolific poet, satirist, teacher and wizard of whimsy who wrote the above doggerel and thousands of other pieces of light verse and prose, much to the delight of several generations of readers, died Tuesday. Armour was 82 and died in a Claremont convalescent home. He had been afflicted for some time with Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | Jack Smith
In writing the other day about kittens, I quoted an eternal truth as expressed in verse by Ogden Nash: The trouble with a kitten is THAT Eventually it becomes a CAT That attribution has provoked a literary footnote from attorney John Hamilton Scott: "It is said that Jeremiah Clarke died of despair because his best Trumpet Voluntary was constantly attributed to Henry Purcell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1988 | BRYAN STYBLE
Like Robert Frost, satirist Richard Armour dismisses free verse, likening it to playing tennis without a net. By any standard, including that set by Frost, Armour ranks as a remarkable talent. Since 1935, the Claremont author and educator has published more than 10,000 pieces of the sort of poetry most beholden to the mechanical considerations valued by Frost: light verse. More incredibly, this prolific output wasn't even the path by which he achieved his greatest fame.
NEWS
March 24, 1988 | BRYAN STYBLE
By any standard, including that set by Frost, Armour ranks as a remarkable talent. Since 1935, the Claremont author and educator has published more than 10,000 pieces of the sort of poetry most beholden to the mechanical considerations valued by Frost: light verse. More incredibly, this prolific output wasn't even the path by which he achieved his greatest fame. Inspired principally by Jonathan Swift, Armour developed his approach to prose with his "It All Started With" books in the 1950s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|