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Richard Artschwager

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013
Richard Artschwager, who died in February at 89, was that exceedingly rare artist who made paintings and sculptures of virtually equal merit. 'Richard Artschwager!' at the Hammer confirms that the artist's best work induces what artist Ed Ruscha has helpfully described as the "Huh? Wow!" sequence of response, rather than the dispiriting "Wow! Huh?" For art, there's nothing better than that. UCLA Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd. Through Sept. 1. Closed Monday. http://www.hammer.ucla.edu .
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By David Ng
The Hammer Museum is receiving a $2-million gift from Los Angeles billionaire Anthony Pritzker that will benefit the organization's education programs for young children. Pritzker, who is a museum board member, said he is making the cash donation over a period of time.  "I've given money to the Hammer Museum before but not of this size and not centered around children," Pritzker said in a recent phone interview. Pritzker and his wife, Jeanne, are making the donation through their family foundation.  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat The $2 million will help fund the Hammer's education initiatives for young children who attend public schools in the area, said Ann Philbin, the museum's director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By David Ng
Richard Artschwager, the painter and sculptor who recently was honored with a career retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, died on Saturday at 89. His death was confirmed by the Gagosian Gallery. Artschwager's death comes just a week after his Whitney retrospective closed in New York. He died in Albany, N.Y., after suffering a stroke, according to reports. The celebrated artist created sculptures, paintings and drawings. Although he was sometimes categorized by critics as a minimalist or pop artist, Artschwager's conceptual work was often difficult to classify.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013
Richard Artschwager, who died in February at 89, was that exceedingly rare artist who made paintings and sculptures of virtually equal merit. 'Richard Artschwager!' at the Hammer confirms that the artist's best work induces what artist Ed Ruscha has helpfully described as the "Huh? Wow!" sequence of response, rather than the dispiriting "Wow! Huh?" For art, there's nothing better than that. UCLA Hammer Museum, 10899 Wilshire Blvd. Through Sept. 1. Closed Monday. http://www.hammer.ucla.edu .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Richard Artschwager, an artist who turned his apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker into a distinctive approach to making sculptures and paintings that defy easy categorization, died Saturday in Albany, N.Y., following a brief illness. He was 89. A retrospective of Artschwager's work, which travels to the UCLA Hammer Museum in June, closed Feb. 3 at the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan. It was the Whitney's second Artschwager retrospective and will be the third to be shown in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1997 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In terms of career, it doesn't pay for an artist to be too original. A case in point is New York-based artist Richard Artschwager, whose work goes on view Saturday at Burnett Miller Gallery at Bergamot Station in Santa Monica. Now 74, Artschwager has exhibited regularly for 35 years and was the subject of a traveling retrospective that stopped at MOCA in 1988. He remains generally unknown, however, largely because his idiosyncratic work slips through the cracks of several different genres.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By David Ng
The Hammer Museum is receiving a $2-million gift from Los Angeles billionaire Anthony Pritzker that will benefit the organization's education programs for young children. Pritzker, who is a museum board member, said he is making the cash donation over a period of time.  "I've given money to the Hammer Museum before but not of this size and not centered around children," Pritzker said in a recent phone interview. Pritzker and his wife, Jeanne, are making the donation through their family foundation.  CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat The $2 million will help fund the Hammer's education initiatives for young children who attend public schools in the area, said Ann Philbin, the museum's director.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Sebastião Salgado embarked on his "Genesis" project as a recovery mission -- for himself as much as for the planet. After decades documenting varieties of human and environmental degradation, the photographer set off in 2004 to record populations and landscapes untouched by modernity. He sought evidence of people and places living in equilibrium, to affirm that it was still possible. Completed in 2011, "Genesis" offers a stunning visual antidote to the tougher, bleaker side of Salgado's output.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
A keen theme exhibition that would grace a small, smart museum is called "Artschwager, Peers and Persuasion 1963-1988." The idea was to bring together artists who share something of the aesthetic of furniture-maker-turned-artist Richard Artschwager whose recent retrospective at the Whitney Museum set the art magazines humming.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Talk about late bloomers. New offerings at the Museum of Contemporary Art's handsome red stone home on Bunker Hill include a big survey of deadpan sculpture and painting by Richard Artschwager who is 64 and didn't get rolling as an artist until he was 40. Then there is an installation by Nancy Spero, who is 62. She has been showing since the '50s, but she's a complete cipher around here.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
Sebastião Salgado embarked on his "Genesis" project as a recovery mission -- for himself as much as for the planet. After decades documenting varieties of human and environmental degradation, the photographer set off in 2004 to record populations and landscapes untouched by modernity. He sought evidence of people and places living in equilibrium, to affirm that it was still possible. Completed in 2011, "Genesis" offers a stunning visual antidote to the tougher, bleaker side of Salgado's output.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Richard Artschwager, who died in February at 89, was that exceedingly rare artist who made paintings and sculptures of virtually equal merit. In contemporary art, usually it's one or the other. Painters paint, sculptors sculpt, and the differences between them constitute a gulf difficult for one artist to bridge. A few painters, such as Ellsworth Kelly, also manage estimable sculpture. Jeff Koons, to cite perhaps the most prominent current example of a sculptor-who-also-paints, has made some terrific sculptures since the 1980s, but every Koons painting I've seen has pretty much been a sad waste of canvas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By David Ng
Richard Artschwager, the painter and sculptor who recently was honored with a career retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, died on Saturday at 89. His death was confirmed by the Gagosian Gallery. Artschwager's death comes just a week after his Whitney retrospective closed in New York. He died in Albany, N.Y., after suffering a stroke, according to reports. The celebrated artist created sculptures, paintings and drawings. Although he was sometimes categorized by critics as a minimalist or pop artist, Artschwager's conceptual work was often difficult to classify.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Richard Artschwager, an artist who turned his apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker into a distinctive approach to making sculptures and paintings that defy easy categorization, died Saturday in Albany, N.Y., following a brief illness. He was 89. A retrospective of Artschwager's work, which travels to the UCLA Hammer Museum in June, closed Feb. 3 at the Whitney Museum of American Art in Manhattan. It was the Whitney's second Artschwager retrospective and will be the third to be shown in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1997 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In terms of career, it doesn't pay for an artist to be too original. A case in point is New York-based artist Richard Artschwager, whose work goes on view Saturday at Burnett Miller Gallery at Bergamot Station in Santa Monica. Now 74, Artschwager has exhibited regularly for 35 years and was the subject of a traveling retrospective that stopped at MOCA in 1988. He remains generally unknown, however, largely because his idiosyncratic work slips through the cracks of several different genres.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Talk about late bloomers. New offerings at the Museum of Contemporary Art's handsome red stone home on Bunker Hill include a big survey of deadpan sculpture and painting by Richard Artschwager who is 64 and didn't get rolling as an artist until he was 40. Then there is an installation by Nancy Spero, who is 62. She has been showing since the '50s, but she's a complete cipher around here.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1988 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Richard Artschwager is sitting on the steps of one of his sculptures, leaning against its monolithic slab, quietly absorbed in a book. He wears jeans rolled up at the cuffs, white sneakers and a nondescript blue shirt. His legs are casually crossed, and he peers at the book's pages through wire-rimmed spectacles. In other circumstances, he could be reading beneath a park monument.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1988 | ELIZABETH VENANT, Times Staff Writer
Richard Artschwager is sitting on the steps of one of his sculptures, leaning against its monolithic slab, quietly absorbed in a book. He wears jeans rolled up at the cuffs, white sneakers and a nondescript blue shirt. His legs are casually crossed, and he peers at the book's pages through wire-rimmed spectacles. In other circumstances, he could be reading beneath a park monument.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
A keen theme exhibition that would grace a small, smart museum is called "Artschwager, Peers and Persuasion 1963-1988." The idea was to bring together artists who share something of the aesthetic of furniture-maker-turned-artist Richard Artschwager whose recent retrospective at the Whitney Museum set the art magazines humming.
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