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April 16, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Quick. Name the guy who sang "Bittersweet Symphony." You can hear the strings riff, pounded into your head from its use in a shoe commercial and the song's 1998 radio omnipresence. You remember the group, the Verve, and maybe can picture the singer--his face was even on the cover of Calendar! But his name? That's the problem facing Virgin Records with the summer release of the solo debut of Richard Ashcroft. (Right! That's the guy.) The fact is that even many of the 1.1 million U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
It must have felt strange for Richard Ashcroft on stage Saturday at the Knitting Factory Hollywood. It was only about 18 months ago that Ashcroft and his band, the Verve, seemed on the edge of international superstardom. Thanks to "Bitter Sweet Symphony" and other tracks from the British group's exquisite "Urban Hymns" album, the Verve was playing before 8,000 to 10,000 cheering fans at the Arrowhead Pond.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2000
* Richard Ashcroft, "Alone With Everybody," Virgin. The English singer begins his post-Verve career. * John Kelley, "HighDesertSoundSystem2," Moonshine Music. The electronic musician is a key figure in the California desert rave community. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent). The albums are already released unless otherwise noted.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2000 | KEVIN CANFIELD, HARTFORD COURANT
Richard Ashcroft, former leader of the English band the Verve, might have thought it edgy to name his first solo album after a Charles Bukowski poem. After all, "Alone With Everybody"--recently released on Virgin Records--is a cool-enough title, replete with the rebel-angst that has made Ashcroft a star in Britain. But Ashcroft is late to this party.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
It must have felt strange for Richard Ashcroft on stage Saturday at the Knitting Factory Hollywood. It was only about 18 months ago that Ashcroft and his band, the Verve, seemed on the edge of international superstardom. Thanks to "Bitter Sweet Symphony" and other tracks from the British group's exquisite "Urban Hymns" album, the Verve was playing before 8,000 to 10,000 cheering fans at the Arrowhead Pond.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn, The Times' pop music critic, can be reached by e-mail at robert.hilburn@latimes.com
The Verve's Richard Ashcroft, British rock's man of the moment, appears drained as he steps into a backstage room at the Brixton Academy concert hall on what should be a night of triumph. It's two hours before the Brit Awards, the English equivalent of the Grammys, start across town at the London Docklands Arena, and the Verve is the odds-on favorite to win best band and best album honors over such heralded rivals as Oasis, Radiohead and Prodigy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2000 | KEVIN CANFIELD, HARTFORD COURANT
Richard Ashcroft, former leader of the English band the Verve, might have thought it edgy to name his first solo album after a Charles Bukowski poem. After all, "Alone With Everybody"--recently released on Virgin Records--is a cool-enough title, replete with the rebel-angst that has made Ashcroft a star in Britain. But Ashcroft is late to this party.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1993 | LORRAINE ALI
* * * Verve, "A Storm in Heaven," Vernon Yard/Virgin. Verve is yet another British band with pouty lips playing trancy tunes, but this debut album makes its mark regardless. Singer Richard Ashcroft's whimsical, occasionally soul-wrenching vocals breeze in and out of delicate guitar interludes and hallucinatory washes of tumbling melody. Verve's "Storm" is a warm, inviting chill-out.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2003
Here are this week's key releases on video/DVD and CD, available beginning Tuesday. *--* Video/DVDs BOX OFFICE (MILLIONS) DOMESTIC FOREIGN "Road to Perdition" Tom Hanks, Paul $104.1 $57.3 Newman; directed by Sam Mendes "Tuck Everlasting" Jonathan Jackson, $19.2 -- Sissy Spacek; directed by Jay Russell "The Tuxedo" Jackie Chan, Jennifer $50.2 $10.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1998 | JERRY CROWE
* Led by singer Richard Ashcroft, right, the Verve will be at the Arrowhead Pond of Anaheim with Massive Attack on Aug. 14. Tickets go on sale Saturday. . . . Tickets will also be available Saturday for the Furthur Festival, featuring the Other Ones (Grateful Dead alumni Mickey Hart, Phil Lesh, Bob Weir and Bruce Hornsby), Rusted Root and Hot Tuna, July 22 at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre. . . . James Taylor will be at the Pond on Aug.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2000
* Richard Ashcroft, "Alone With Everybody," Virgin. The English singer begins his post-Verve career. * John Kelley, "HighDesertSoundSystem2," Moonshine Music. The electronic musician is a key figure in the California desert rave community. Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent). The albums are already released unless otherwise noted.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Quick. Name the guy who sang "Bittersweet Symphony." You can hear the strings riff, pounded into your head from its use in a shoe commercial and the song's 1998 radio omnipresence. You remember the group, the Verve, and maybe can picture the singer--his face was even on the cover of Calendar! But his name? That's the problem facing Virgin Records with the summer release of the solo debut of Richard Ashcroft. (Right! That's the guy.) The fact is that even many of the 1.1 million U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1998 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn, The Times' pop music critic, can be reached by e-mail at robert.hilburn@latimes.com
The Verve's Richard Ashcroft, British rock's man of the moment, appears drained as he steps into a backstage room at the Brixton Academy concert hall on what should be a night of triumph. It's two hours before the Brit Awards, the English equivalent of the Grammys, start across town at the London Docklands Arena, and the Verve is the odds-on favorite to win best band and best album honors over such heralded rivals as Oasis, Radiohead and Prodigy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1997 | Sara Scribner
After Radiohead, Oasis, Blur, the Chemical Brothers, Goldie and--phew--Tricky, you have to figure that England's well of ear-grabbing talent just has to run dry soon. And here comes the Verve. Four years after a so-so debut album and two years after the group broke up, the band has patched it all together with a lush, intricate, ethereal sound, psychedelic guitars and the kind of attention to lyrical details that you usually find in folk music.
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