Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard B Dixon
IN THE NEWS

Richard B Dixon

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993 | RICHARD SIMON and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard B. Dixon, forced out as Los Angeles County's chief administrator in part because of his approval of pension increases for himself and other top officials, has been quietly hired as a $200-an-hour adviser to the county retirement board. Charles Conrad, administrator of the Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Assn., said in an interview Tuesday that he hired Dixon as an adviser on the sale of bonds to pay off the county's nearly $2-billion liability to the pension system.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993 | RICHARD SIMON and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard B. Dixon, forced out as Los Angeles County's chief administrator in part because of his approval of pension increases for himself and other top officials, has been quietly hired as a $200-an-hour adviser to the county retirement board. Charles Conrad, administrator of the Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Assn., said in an interview Tuesday that he hired Dixon as an adviser on the sale of bonds to pay off the county's nearly $2-billion liability to the pension system.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 20, 1989
"We are sort of like a teen-ager whose parents have just inherited money from their rich aunt. We hope that our parents will remember us in this time of need." --Richard B. Dixon, the county's chief administrative officer, expressing hope that the state will send some of its new-found $2.5-billion surplus to Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1993
The Board of Supervisors honored retiring Chief Administrative Officer Richard Dixon during a brief ceremony Tuesday marking the end of his 34-year career in county government. Board Chairman Ed Edelman presented Dixon with a plaque, and about 100 county employees in the hearing room gave him a standing ovation. Dixon announced his resignation last year after several controversies surrounding his unprecedented control of county funds and the $6-million renovation of his offices.
OPINION
February 9, 1992
Your article made my blood boil. With the exception of Gloria Molina, a new supervisor, the people of Los Angeles should find a way to get rid of the entire board and especially Richard B. Dixon, chief administrative officer, for malfeasance. When people are spending hours on hospital gurneys at County General Hospital waiting for medical treatment because of lack of funds to hire staff, and the many other ailments the public is suffering because of lack of funds, the behavior of Dixon and the board should not have to be tolerated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1990
A panel Monday recommended that Los Angeles County revise the duties of the chief administrative officer to give the county's top executive official greater powers. The Economy and Efficiency Commission voted 12-8 to recommend that the Board of Supervisors look into establishing the post of county manager. The supervisors would have to approve the plan by July 31 to get the proposal on the November ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1992
Embattled Los Angeles County Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon said he will leave office on Jan. 15, following four controversial years as one of the most powerful public administrators in America. Dixon had announced his intention to retire in July, but waited to set a fixed date for his departure while attempting to resolve the county's budgetary problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1992
County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn on Friday ordered the county auditor-controller's office to investigate a controversial $6-million project to refurbish the offices of Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon. Last week, a report by the county grand jury found that Dixon's staff had discarded nearly all records of the project's expenditures. Auditors also found that Dixon failed to report that his office spent $1.4 million on furniture, twice the amount reported to the Board of Supervisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1992
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, moving to keep a closer eye on the activities of the county's powerful chief administrative officer, voted Tuesday to increase oversight of fund transfers within county departments. The action comes following a grand jury report that is highly critical of CAO Richard B. Dixon, who has announced that he will retire by the end of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1993 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to a state budget proposal by Gov. Pete Wilson that would sharply reduce allocations to local government, Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon called Friday for $425.1 million in cuts in Los Angeles County public hospitals, mental health clinics, the Sheriff's Department and other county services. In a memorandum to the Board of Supervisors, Dixon estimated that the county will face an $845.5-million shortfall in its budget for fiscal year 1993-94, which begins July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1993 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to a state budget proposal by Gov. Pete Wilson that would sharply reduce allocations to local government, Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon called Friday for $425.1 million in cuts in Los Angeles County public hospitals, mental health clinics, the Sheriff's Department and other county services. In a memorandum to the Board of Supervisors, Dixon estimated that the county will face an $845.5-million shortfall in its budget for fiscal year 1993-94, which begins July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1992
Embattled Los Angeles County Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon said he will leave office on Jan. 15, following four controversial years as one of the most powerful public administrators in America. Dixon had announced his intention to retire in July, but waited to set a fixed date for his departure while attempting to resolve the county's budgetary problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just a day after he recommended drastic cuts in county services, Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon's own lavish spending has been questioned by an official audit, which said the controversial renovation of his offices cost $2.6 million more than he reported. The audit, released Friday, said Dixon, Los Angeles County's top bureaucrat, spent $1.6 million on furniture alone, $850,000 more than he reported to the Board of Supervisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon said Thursday a published report that sparked protests by county employees and calls for his immediate resignation was an inaccurate portrayal of a routine pay increase for his employees. The Los Angeles Daily News reported Thursday that Dixon granted raises of up to 8% to 70 staff members while calling for pay cuts and layoffs of other county employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1992
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, moving to keep a closer eye on the activities of the county's powerful chief administrative officer, voted Tuesday to increase oversight of fund transfers within county departments. The action comes following a grand jury report that is highly critical of CAO Richard B. Dixon, who has announced that he will retire by the end of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1992 | RICHARD SIMON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the wake of Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon's announcement that he will step down, Los Angeles County supervisors turned their attention Wednesday to further whittling away the powers they gave to the man described as one of the nation's most powerful bureaucrats. Supervisor Gloria Molina proposed stripping the chief administrative officer of his authority to rearrange department budgets at will without approval of the Board of Supervisors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1989 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
A department director who has received nearly $150,000 in salary, even though he has not worked in nearly two years, was removed from office Tuesday by Los Angeles County supervisors. The board removed George Tice, director of the Facilities Management Department, after quizzing Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon about why it took so long to determine that Tice's stress-related illnesses made him incapable of returning to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1989 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
Los Angeles County's chief administrative officer Tuesday blocked a move to open a special care center for severely mentally disturbed and abused teen-agers who are now kept with less-troubled children at MacLaren Children's Center. The action by Richard B. Dixon drew an angry response from Supervisor Pete Schabarum, who has been pushing for the intensive care facility since 1985. Accusing Dixon of bureaucratic delays, he said, "You've done a good job in giving me a lot of bull in this matter."
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The release this week of a report that is highly critical of the county Sheriff's Department and the announced resignation of county government's top administrator are likely to further wound incumbents and provide more fodder for their opponents in two of three runoff elections for county offices, political analysts said Tuesday.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles County Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon, buffeted by allegations of misspending taxpayer funds and weakened by calls for his firing, said Tuesday that he will resign by year's end "in the best interests of the county."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|