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Richard B Edgar

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990
The turmoil that has arisen in the media regarding my recent letter to Tustin ministers is unwarranted. To my knowledge, there has not been an invocation delivered at the beginning of a Tustin City Council meeting that has been improper. The interpretation of what I said has been misconstrued to say that Jesus Christ could not be mentioned. I did not write that. However, there is continuing escalation of court cases to the U.S. Supreme Court and courts at all other levels that refine the precise bounds as to what is acceptable and what is not. It is prudent to be informed of these facts and to conduct such invocations in accordance with appropriate court decisions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Former Mayor Richard Edgar died Friday after being struck by a car while crossing a street, police said. Edgar, 82, was removed from life-support a day after he was struck, said Lt. Joe Stickles. Edgar had been hospitalized at Western Medical Center in Santa Ana. The accident remains under investigation, Stickles said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former Tustin Mayor Richard B. Edgar has died of injuries caused when he was struck by a vehicle, police said. With his family at his side, Edgar, 82, was removed from life support Friday at Western Medical Center-Santa Ana a day after the accident, said Lt. Joe Stickles, a Tustin police spokesman. Stickles said Edgar was in the crosswalk at Newport Avenue and Main Street in Tustin on Thursday afternoon when a sport utility vehicle driven by Clyde Byron Bronson, 67, of Tustin hit him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2004 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former Tustin Mayor Richard B. Edgar has died of injuries caused when he was struck by a vehicle, police said. With his family at his side, Edgar, 82, was removed from life support Friday at Western Medical Center-Santa Ana a day after the accident, said Lt. Joe Stickles, a Tustin police spokesman. Stickles said Edgar was in the crosswalk at Newport Avenue and Main Street in Tustin on Thursday afternoon when a sport utility vehicle driven by Clyde Byron Bronson, 67, of Tustin hit him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1990 | SHANNON SANDS
le Mayor Richard B. Edgar tries to distance himself from the growing controversy over restrictions on prayers before public meetings, the leader of an angry group of clergy on Thursday called for Edgar's resignation. This week, Edgar sent another letter to local clergy in which he backed off from the city attorney's statement that ministers could no longer mention any religion or deity during invocations. Edgar said his original letter, written on the advice of City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1989
During the last several weeks, a considerable amount of criticism has been published regarding the decision by the Tustin City Council to revert back to April from November for local City Council elections. Although the reasons have been carefully stated during council discussion and relayed to reporters so that the details could be published, this has not happened. The last Tustin City Council election was held in November, 1988, at the same time as the general presidential election.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1990 | SHANNON SANDS
About 25 people gathered in front of Tustin City Hall on Monday in a continued protest of restrictions on invocations before City Council meetings. Speaking beneath a "Freedom of Speech" banner, group leaders said they want Mayor Richard B. Edgar to apologize for a letter that they interpreted to mean "Jesus Christ" could not be said during invocations. "Our religious rights are being challenged," said Tustin attorney Nova Dean Pack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1990 | LYNN SMITH and SHANNON SANDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In most Orange County cities, opening prayers are as customary at city council meetings as the flag salute. But in a climate of growing sensitivity to diverse beliefs, the public invocation has become an uneasy, sometimes testy, junction for church and state. "There aren't any rules," said Shari Erlewine, director of communications for the League of California Cities. "It's handled different by nearly every city. If anything, there's a trend to no invocation at all."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
Former Mayor Richard Edgar died Friday after being struck by a car while crossing a street, police said. Edgar, 82, was removed from life-support a day after he was struck, said Lt. Joe Stickles. Edgar had been hospitalized at Western Medical Center in Santa Ana. The accident remains under investigation, Stickles said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1992
Tustin voters go to the polls Tuesday to elect three members to the City Council. Six candidates are running for the three seats: incumbents Richard B. Edgar, Jim Potts and Earl J. Prescott, and challengers Jeannie Jackson, Thomas R. Saltarelli and Jeffrey Thomas. City Clerk Mary E. Wynn, whose name also appears on the ballot, is running unopposed. Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p.m. For further information, call the city clerk's office at (714) 544-8890.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1990
The turmoil that has arisen in the media regarding my recent letter to Tustin ministers is unwarranted. To my knowledge, there has not been an invocation delivered at the beginning of a Tustin City Council meeting that has been improper. The interpretation of what I said has been misconstrued to say that Jesus Christ could not be mentioned. I did not write that. However, there is continuing escalation of court cases to the U.S. Supreme Court and courts at all other levels that refine the precise bounds as to what is acceptable and what is not. It is prudent to be informed of these facts and to conduct such invocations in accordance with appropriate court decisions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1990 | SHANNON SANDS
About 25 people gathered in front of Tustin City Hall on Monday in a continued protest of restrictions on invocations before City Council meetings. Speaking beneath a "Freedom of Speech" banner, group leaders said they want Mayor Richard B. Edgar to apologize for a letter that they interpreted to mean "Jesus Christ" could not be said during invocations. "Our religious rights are being challenged," said Tustin attorney Nova Dean Pack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1990 | LYNN SMITH and SHANNON SANDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In most Orange County cities, opening prayers are as customary at city council meetings as the flag salute. But in a climate of growing sensitivity to diverse beliefs, the public invocation has become an uneasy, sometimes testy, junction for church and state. "There aren't any rules," said Shari Erlewine, director of communications for the League of California Cities. "It's handled different by nearly every city. If anything, there's a trend to no invocation at all."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1990 | SHANNON SANDS
le Mayor Richard B. Edgar tries to distance himself from the growing controversy over restrictions on prayers before public meetings, the leader of an angry group of clergy on Thursday called for Edgar's resignation. This week, Edgar sent another letter to local clergy in which he backed off from the city attorney's statement that ministers could no longer mention any religion or deity during invocations. Edgar said his original letter, written on the advice of City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1989
During the last several weeks, a considerable amount of criticism has been published regarding the decision by the Tustin City Council to revert back to April from November for local City Council elections. Although the reasons have been carefully stated during council discussion and relayed to reporters so that the details could be published, this has not happened. The last Tustin City Council election was held in November, 1988, at the same time as the general presidential election.
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