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Richard B Mckenzie

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991 | KRISTINA LINDGREN
Economist and author Richard B. McKenzie, who has been named to UC Irvine's Walter B. Gerken Chair in Enterprise and Society, said he hopes to bring a more global perspective to students in the university's Graduate School of Management.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1991 | KRISTINA LINDGREN
Economist and author Richard B. McKenzie, who has been named to UC Irvine's Walter B. Gerken Chair in Enterprise and Society, said he hopes to bring a more global perspective to students in the university's Graduate School of Management.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2000
I thought Richard B. McKenzie was in trouble ("Let's Bring Back Children's Homes," Commentary, March 23) when he made his case in favor of children's homes by citing fictional scenes and quoting fictional characters from the movie "The Cider House Rules." When he conceded that there are no official statistics to support his contention that failed adoptions are on the rise but proceeded anyway to indulge in speculation about why adoptions fail, I concluded I had stumbled across a piece of comic fantasy that had gotten misplaced on the Commentary page.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1993 | MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faxing a letter is not only significantly quicker than mailing one through the U.S. Postal Service, but it is also cheaper, according to a recent study by a UC Irvine professor. "I was surprised by how cheap it is to fax something," said the study's author, Richard B. McKenzie, a professor in UCI's Graduate School of Management. "The fax machine represents a real competitive challenge to the Postal Service," he said.
NEWS
January 9, 1995 | DENNIS ROMERO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're in the top 20% of income earners in the country. They live in households that take in about $60,000 a year or more. They often have a nice house and two cars in the driveway. But whatever you call them, don't call them rich. Economists call them upper class. They call themselves middle class--and mad. They're Americans largely overlooked by President Clinton's proposed "middle class" tax cuts (although many in this group would benefit under Republicans' "family" tax-cut plans).
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | SONNI EFRON and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite assurances that the current recession has been milder than earlier downturns, newly revised labor statistics now show that Orange County has lost at least three times as many jobs as were lost during the recession of 1981-82. In fact, economists said, the job loss could make the slump the worst in at least two decades. And even after the long-promised recovery arrives, it could take four to 10 years to recover the lost jobs, analysts say.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
French families flock to visit a wondrous new American import--Euro Disney, the giant amusement park. A tumble in Tokyo's stock market, meanwhile, triggers a plunge on Wall Street and rattles nerves in financial capitals everywhere. At the same time, overseas rivalry hits Peoria, Ill., as giant Caterpillar Inc. makes tough new demands on its workers, it says, in order to survive.
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