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December 16, 1994 | BRIAN FAIR BERKEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Running From Safety," which is billed as a novel, is narrated by Richard Bach, a successful writer who is visited one day by a "teaching angel." This being tells him that "In 1944 . . . you promised for the boy you were, everything you know. What to look out for, how to be happy, knowledge to save your life, things you wish you'd known when you were him."
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NEWS
December 16, 1994 | BRIAN FAIR BERKEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Running From Safety," which is billed as a novel, is narrated by Richard Bach, a successful writer who is visited one day by a "teaching angel." This being tells him that "In 1944 . . . you promised for the boy you were, everything you know. What to look out for, how to be happy, knowledge to save your life, things you wish you'd known when you were him."
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NEWS
February 1, 1993 | S. J. DIAMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the dream of authors, the lifeblood of publishing and talk shows. It's the "phenomenon" bestseller, a book whose huge success few predicted but many will gladly explain. In a classic case, the book starts with a limited printing and less promotion and "just takes off," moving up the charts, out into worldwide sales in the millions. And the little-known author makes the tours, takes the money and quickly tries to extend the "phenomenon."
NEWS
February 1, 1993 | S. J. DIAMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the dream of authors, the lifeblood of publishing and talk shows. It's the "phenomenon" bestseller, a book whose huge success few predicted but many will gladly explain. In a classic case, the book starts with a limited printing and less promotion and "just takes off," moving up the charts, out into worldwide sales in the millions. And the little-known author makes the tours, takes the money and quickly tries to extend the "phenomenon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Barry Alan Berkus, a California architect who left a deep imprint on mass-market housing, spurring trends toward homes with grand entrances, high ceilings, master suites, natural light and open spaces, has died. He was 77. Berkus, who had leukemia, died Nov. 30 in Santa Barbara, where he had lived for more than 30 years, said his architect son, Jeffrey. During a career that spanned nearly six decades, the senior Berkus built a portfolio of 600,000 dwellings encompassing about 10,000 designs in developments across the United States, including Playa Vista in Los Angeles, Harbor View in Newport Beach, Turtle Rock Highlands and Woodbridge Landing in Irvine, and Park Imperial South in Palm Springs.
BOOKS
June 20, 1993 | CHRIS GOODRICH
ABOVE THE CLOUDS by Jonathan Bach (William Morrow: $20; 288 pp.). Imagine yourself a teen-ager in a hospital bed, arm broken and eyes blackened, trying to absorb the fact that you, the driver, have survived a car accident five hours earlier--but your little sister did not. Then imagine your father calling, someone you hardly know because he left your mother and five siblings 15 years earlier. What does he say?
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George Seabrook Wing, a self-taught aeronautical engineer who invented the fasteners used in virtually all aircraft flying today, has died. He was 74. Wing died Tuesday at Torrance Memorial Medical Center after a brief battle with cancer. Born in Kewanee, Wis., Wing began working for Glenn Martin Aviation in Baltimore, building the China Clipper and the B-10 bomber when he was only 16.
BOOKS
November 10, 1991 | Michael Wilmington, Wilmington writes about film for The Times, L.A. Style and Film, Comment
What makes a big-time movie go bad? The script? Casting? Direction? All of the above? Dicey questions. And few movie critics or reporters have ever been able to answer them as completely as Julie Salamon in "The Devil's Candy." If this book isn't quite the coup or classic some critics claim, it's still a fine, cool-headed, fact-filled expose. More than anything, it's the subject--and Salamon's unusual access to it--that make "Candy" special. This many-sided account of the making (unmaking?
SPORTS
November 14, 1989 | HEATHER SMALLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Running used to be a chore for Cathi Peck, Woodbridge High School's top cross-country runner. Now it is an outlet; it distracts her, calms her, keeps her on an even keel. "Before, I was pounding it out just for competitiveness," Peck said. "But now, I go on these long runs to clear my mind. It's basically mental--there are just a million times you can give up in a race." Peck, The Times' Athlete of the Week, has been Woodbridge's top runner for four years.
REAL ESTATE
March 4, 2007 | Maggie Barnett, Times Staff Writer
IF you think consulting a feng shui expert on the design of the monkey enclosure at the Los Angeles Zoo was a reasonable expense, this book might appeal to you. "Natural Remodeling for the Not-So-Green House" by Carol Venolia and Kelly Lerner is zealous in its promotion of "green" living. It's also full of ideas for, as the cover blurb says, "bringing your home into harmony with nature." But it downplays the costs and building skills required.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1995 | ROSANNE WELCH, Rosanne Welch is a North Hollywood writer whose credits include an episode for Beverly Hills 90210
When was the last time you cried because a store closed in your neighborhood? That happened last Sunday night in North Hollywood at the Iguana Cafe, also known as Iguanaland: The Smallest Theme Park in the World. Sure, you say, the Valley is full of coffeehouses, one on every block it seems, so what's the big deal? This was the Iguana. My husband held his first art show there. He played his first harmonica jam there and he read the first poems he had written since college on that stage.
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