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Richard Bagley

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WORLD
June 16, 2003 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Richard Bagley doesn't sound like someone who just hit the jackpot. Last week, he became one of the nation's wealthiest whistle-blowers when Northrop Grumman Corp. agreed to settle a case he and the Justice Department brought against TRW Inc., and the department awarded him $27.2 million. In all, Los Angeles-based Northrop Grumman, which recently acquired TRW, agreed to pay $111.2 million to resolve claims that TRW padded bills for defense work done in the early 1990s.
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WORLD
June 16, 2003 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Richard Bagley doesn't sound like someone who just hit the jackpot. Last week, he became one of the nation's wealthiest whistle-blowers when Northrop Grumman Corp. agreed to settle a case he and the Justice Department brought against TRW Inc., and the department awarded him $27.2 million. In all, Los Angeles-based Northrop Grumman, which recently acquired TRW, agreed to pay $111.2 million to resolve claims that TRW padded bills for defense work done in the early 1990s.
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BUSINESS
February 20, 1998 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
TRW Inc.'s Space and Technology Group in Redondo Beach allegedly defrauded the government of more than $50 million under a billing scheme involving top company officers, including former TRW executive and current NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, according to a whistle-blower lawsuit backed by the government. The 1994 lawsuit, which was made public Thursday, was filed under seal in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles by Richard D.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"On the Bowery" may be more than half a century old, but it is no relic. This landmark documentary disturbs and compels as much today in a new 35mm restoration as it did when it opened in 1956 to both criticism and acclaim. Though only 65 minutes long, the story of three days spent in the heart of New York's infamous skid row (characterized by a rescue mission minister as "the saddest and maddest street in the world") unnerved some critics with its rough-edged rawness but also captured numerous awards, including an Oscar nomination, a British Academy Award and the Venice Film Festival documentary grand prize.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their first year, the uninitiated arrive on this field woefully ill-equipped: barehanded, wearing shorts and sandals, without even a bag or a bucket to carry out the goods. The second year, they wise up: leather gloves, jeans, sturdy shoes, a wagon perhaps. By year three ingenuity kicks in: Bring on the wheelbarrow. Tether a plastic garbage can to a dolly. Load up the double baby stroller. Heck, roll out a city-issued trash barrel.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2003 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
In one of the nation's largest whistle-blower settlements, Northrop Grumman Corp. said Monday that it would pay the federal government $111.2 million to resolve claims that TRW Inc., which it recently acquired, padded bills for defense work done in the early 1990s. The agreement ends a nine-year legal fight initiated by Richard Bagley, a former chief financial officer for TRW's Redondo Beach unit. Bagley alleged that TRW overcharged the Pentagon for work on several space electronics programs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Lionel Rogosin's 1956 film "On the Bowery" is a time capsule in at least two senses: a portrait of a hand-to-mouth existence of a once-notorious New York City thoroughfare, as well as a glimpse into a largely forgotten byway of American documentary film. The milelong stretch of Lower Manhattan known as the Bowery was a thriving entertainment district in the 19th century. But by the time of Rogosin's indelible chronicle — which Milestone Films is issuing in a two-disc DVD this week, in both standard and Blu-ray editions — the neighborhood had long been in decline.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2003 | From Times Staff
Judge Sentences Waksal to More Than 7 Years Samuel D. Waksal, founder of drug maker ImClone Systems Inc., was sentenced to more than seven years in prison and fined $4.3 million by a federal judge who called Waksal's insider trading abuses "truly incalculable." Waksal, 55, is the first prominent U.S. chief executive to be sentenced to prison in the corporate scandals that erupted after Enron Corp. collapsed in 2001.
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