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Richard Battaglia

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by federal "peace dividend" money freed by the end of the Cold War, Los Angeles school officials plan to establish a math and science magnet school in the San Fernando Valley aimed at hearing-impaired students--the first program of its kind in the city.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District's highly respected magnet school program offers students a specialized curriculum in subjects such as math, science, law and the arts. With smaller class sizes, as well as teachers specially selected for their expertise, the magnet schools have developed a strong reputation in an era of declining confidence in public schools.
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NEWS
September 25, 1986 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, Gray is a Van Nuys free-lance writer
Each weekday morning 34 buses arrive at the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies, depositing students from every corner of the Los Angeles Unified School District. There, they juggle a complex schedule that involves six periods of classes on Mondays, and alternating three-period schedules on the other days of the week. Required courses include all the basics, as well as study habits and techniques, computer orientation, creative writing and communication skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1993 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Backed by federal "peace dividend" money freed by the end of the Cold War, Los Angeles school officials plan to establish a math and science magnet school in the San Fernando Valley aimed at hearing-impaired students--the first program of its kind in the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Unified School District's highly respected magnet school program offers students a specialized curriculum in subjects such as math, science, law and the arts. With smaller class sizes, as well as teachers specially selected for their expertise, the magnet schools have developed a strong reputation in an era of declining confidence in public schools.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A local theme park development company has teamed with an Irvine design firm to explore the possibility of building a major theme park in Irwindale. Richard Battaglia, president of Battaglia Associates in Irvine, confirmed Wednesday that his company and U.S. Entertainment Centers Inc. of Seal Beach are proposing to build a Disneyland-style park. The theme of the attraction and the types of rides have yet to be decided, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1993 | SUSAN BYRNES
The region's first environmental and agricultural science magnet program has been proposed for Canoga Park High School. The proposal, pending approval by the Los Angeles Unified School District Board of Education, would cost about $97,000 for equipment and supplies. If accepted, Canoga Park would join about two dozen other Valley elementary, middle schools and high schools that have magnet programs in subjects ranging from performing arts to medicine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1994 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The refurbished Los Angeles Central Library could be host to the city's first "information superhighway" magnet high school next fall if Los Angeles school board members sign off on the recommendation made by the city Library Commission. According to the commission's proposal, made last week, students would use the library's vast computer resources to prepare for careers including telecommunications and database management.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1994 | MAKI BECKER
More than 3,700 letters from faculty members and parents opposing year-round classes at Van Nuys High School have been sent to district administrators, officials said. "Van Nuys is not a typical high school. . . . It's not something that fits a mold," said Michael Lewis, a parent of a magnet student and member of the Van Nuys High School Shared Decision Making Council. The school offers three magnet programs--math-science, medical and performing arts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
There is nothing lazy about the days of summer for the San Fernando Valley's newest magnet schools. With less than two months until their doors open, administrators at many of the 10 magnets are scrambling to recruit students, hire teachers and rearrange classrooms. From Canoga Park to Sylmar, teachers and coordinators are working overtime to pin down curriculum plans, install computer systems and set up offices.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | BARBARA BRONSON GRAY, Gray is a Van Nuys free-lance writer
Each weekday morning 34 buses arrive at the Sherman Oaks Center for Enriched Studies, depositing students from every corner of the Los Angeles Unified School District. There, they juggle a complex schedule that involves six periods of classes on Mondays, and alternating three-period schedules on the other days of the week. Required courses include all the basics, as well as study habits and techniques, computer orientation, creative writing and communication skills.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | DIANE SEO
Parents frustrated by the conditions of their neighborhood schools can apply to two alternative programs offered by the Los Angeles Unified School District. Magnet programs: There are two types of magnet programs. One allows students to specialize in a particular area, such as the performing arts, business or medicine. The other type offers alternative, gifted or fundamental programs on a regular school campus or at a specialized magnet school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1989 | Herbert J. Vida
Kathrin Boehmer and Kathryn Golden, both of Laguna Beach, are the winners of Rotary International Foundation scholarships for a year of study abroad. Both were sponsored by the Laguna Beach Rotary Club. Boehmer is studying English and German languages at UC Berkeley. She will serve as an Ambassador of Good Will in Munich while pursuing her studies. Golden is studying business economics and French literature at UC Santa Barbara.
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