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Richard Bausch

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March 14, 2010 | By Donna Seaman
Something Is Out There Stories Richard Bausch Alfred A. Knopf: 288 pp., $25.95 We surrender our attention to a well-told tale with a particular anticipation, opening ourselves to its rhythms of disclosure, its promise of resolution. And then, because we can hold a story whole in our mind, we replay it and marvel over the subtle clues that point to its inevitable or wildly unexpected conclusion. Such stories become even more intriguing with repeated readings: They are the kind of short stories that Richard Bausch has been creating with artistry and compassion since the early 1980s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Donna Seaman
Something Is Out There Stories Richard Bausch Alfred A. Knopf: 288 pp., $25.95 We surrender our attention to a well-told tale with a particular anticipation, opening ourselves to its rhythms of disclosure, its promise of resolution. And then, because we can hold a story whole in our mind, we replay it and marvel over the subtle clues that point to its inevitable or wildly unexpected conclusion. Such stories become even more intriguing with repeated readings: They are the kind of short stories that Richard Bausch has been creating with artistry and compassion since the early 1980s.
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BOOKS
September 22, 1991 | Charles Solomon
In his short stories, Bausch depicts an emotionally bleak world, where people strive for love, acceptance and forgiveness. In the title story, a young woman realizes how weary she's grown of her husband, who seems as flat and featureless as the Midwestern landscape. She can't bring herself to leave him after an accident at a fire leaves him temporarily helpless, but neither can she find the love needed to rebuild their shared life.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, Special To The Times
On June 3, Slobodan Milosevic blinked. President Martti Ahtisaari of Finland offered him a deal, and, in the time it takes for lashes to fall and rise, he said OK. There have certainly been other blinks in the on-again-off-again negotiations that followed. But it was that one big blink, after 10 weeks of NATO bombardment, that brought the war in Yugoslavia back into large print on the front page. Tht's what drama's about, after all--a long, stultifying stare, and then a blink. And the short story, the most economical of one-act dramas, relies on getting that blink on cue. Richard Bausch has written many fine novels, but itis as a story writer--and particularly in his latest collection, "Someone to Watch Over Me," that he displays his supreme mastery over the blink.
BOOKS
July 12, 1987 | Sharon Dirlam, Dirlam is a Times staff writer
"Spirits" is called a collection of short stories, but it is more a collection of characters captured and considered at the moment fate twists their lives around. The nine stories follow no discernible rules of plot or narrative; some have little sense of a beginning or satisfying denouement. The writer seems simply to arrive at the place where these people exist, to perceive them, and to give a penetrating account of their situations. Each one seems completely real.
BOOKS
May 7, 1989 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
Strong characters sustain a family story line as a gifted novelist mines the universal in a pit of the mundane. Richard Bausch could have lathered up a soap opera from this father-daughter tale of James and Annie Field. James, a widower, lives in Duluth and works at the local bank, and he tipples a little too often while attempting to be parent, provider and protector. Annie is an otherwise intelligent young woman who opts to run out on her father in favor of life with Cole Gilbertson, the nearest handsome, drug-abusing dropout.
NEWS
June 11, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, Special To The Times
On June 3, Slobodan Milosevic blinked. President Martti Ahtisaari of Finland offered him a deal, and, in the time it takes for lashes to fall and rise, he said OK. There have certainly been other blinks in the on-again-off-again negotiations that followed. But it was that one big blink, after 10 weeks of NATO bombardment, that brought the war in Yugoslavia back into large print on the front page. Tht's what drama's about, after all--a long, stultifying stare, and then a blink. And the short story, the most economical of one-act dramas, relies on getting that blink on cue. Richard Bausch has written many fine novels, but itis as a story writer--and particularly in his latest collection, "Someone to Watch Over Me," that he displays his supreme mastery over the blink.
BOOKS
January 26, 1992 | RICHARD EDER
A young couple, struggling with finances and the prospect of a first baby, drive from Virginia to Chicago to visit the husband's mother. Randomly caught in a convenience-store shootout, the husband witnesses four killings, is held briefly hostage, and escapes. The experience arouses his own suppressed memories of the violence inflicted upon him as a child, and all but destroys him. Richard Bausch's new novel is in part a portrait of the small increments of pain in a young marriage in trouble.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
One of the things the short story has been particularly fitted for since the days of Chekhov is writing up the small movements of the soul. Small, but not insignificant. The shift of the two-penny nail topples horse and king. A soul doesn't move all that frequently, though. Staking out its burrow, the writer can grow impatient and seize upon the first stirring as a sign of it.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Person I Have Mostly Become," the narrator's family decides to celebrate--beer in champagne glasses--when they learn he may at last have the chance to land a significant remodeling job. It could mean $5,000 net, probably more, and that's a large sum considering that the narrator (who never gives his name) has been out of work for a long time--and that his mother, through housecleaning, has been contributing more to the family income than he has.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Person I Have Mostly Become," the narrator's family decides to celebrate--beer in champagne glasses--when they learn he may at last have the chance to land a significant remodeling job. It could mean $5,000 net, probably more, and that's a large sum considering that the narrator (who never gives his name) has been out of work for a long time--and that his mother, through housecleaning, has been contributing more to the family income than he has.
BOOKS
April 25, 1993 | Douglas Glover, Glover's most recent novel, "The Life and Times of Captain N." (Alfred A. Knopf), is just published
Part country-and-Western lament, part post-Vietnam War pulse-taking and part pure Americana, Richard Bausch's novel "Rebel Powers" is a poignant examination of the state of middle America in the late 20th Century.
BOOKS
September 22, 1991 | Charles Solomon
In his short stories, Bausch depicts an emotionally bleak world, where people strive for love, acceptance and forgiveness. In the title story, a young woman realizes how weary she's grown of her husband, who seems as flat and featureless as the Midwestern landscape. She can't bring herself to leave him after an accident at a fire leaves him temporarily helpless, but neither can she find the love needed to rebuild their shared life.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | RICHARD EDER, TIMES BOOK CRITIC
One of the things the short story has been particularly fitted for since the days of Chekhov is writing up the small movements of the soul. Small, but not insignificant. The shift of the two-penny nail topples horse and king. A soul doesn't move all that frequently, though. Staking out its burrow, the writer can grow impatient and seize upon the first stirring as a sign of it.
BOOKS
May 7, 1989 | Art Seidenbaum, Seidenbaum is The Times' Opinion editor.
Strong characters sustain a family story line as a gifted novelist mines the universal in a pit of the mundane. Richard Bausch could have lathered up a soap opera from this father-daughter tale of James and Annie Field. James, a widower, lives in Duluth and works at the local bank, and he tipples a little too often while attempting to be parent, provider and protector. Annie is an otherwise intelligent young woman who opts to run out on her father in favor of life with Cole Gilbertson, the nearest handsome, drug-abusing dropout.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | DAVE JOHNSON
Derrick Poole is bringing up baby, just the way the child's mother had asked in her last words to him. When 1-year-old Michele Poole was born by Caesarean section on July 30, 1986, her mother had been brain-dead for 53 days, after lapsing into a coma because of a brain tumor. The mother, Marie Odette Henderson, had been kept on life-support machines by a court order obtained by Poole, giving Michele critical time to grow.
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