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Richard Ben Cramer

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August 5, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a pol pumping hands at a fund-raiser, Richard Ben Cramer has the gig down cold: Say hello ("Good to meeetcha!"), sign the book ("Glad you liiiked it!") and move on to the next customer ("Hey, howyadooin?"). Never mind that he's 30 minutes late to his own party. Or that he burst into a Capitol Hill bookstore with sweat pouring off him. The bedraggled author has an excuse . . . just like any candidate running behind. "I couldn't find a cab," Cramer says breathlessly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2013 | Times wire services
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Richard Ben Cramer, whose narrative nonfiction spanned presidential politics and the game of baseball, has died. He was 62. Cramer died Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore of complications from lung cancer, said his agent, Philippa Brophy. He won the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting from the Middle East while working as a foreign correspondent for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Cramer's other notable work included a bestselling biography of New York Yankees great Joe DiMaggio, an influential magazine profile of another baseball star, Ted Williams, and a critically acclaimed, behind-the-scenes account of the 1988 U.S. presidential race, "What It Takes: The Way to the White House.
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BOOKS
July 12, 1992 | Ronald Brownstein, Brownstein is national political correspondent for the Times.
For years, voters and pundits alike have been conducting a deathwatch on American politics. The symptoms are well known: fewer people voting, more negative commercials, debate squeezed into ever shorter sound bites on the evening news. The only thing more depressing than these trends has been the suffocating sense that they are irreversible. Well, don't look now, but the patient is showing signs of life. Voters are suddenly reasserting control over the election process.
BOOKS
August 1, 2004 | Michael Parks, Michael Parks is the director of the School of Journalism at USC's Annenberg School for Communication. He was the editor of The Times from 1997 to 2000 and a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for the paper, covering China, Russia, South Africa and the Middle East.
Throughout human history, every war, every conflict, however terrible, however long, has eventually ended. The Hundred Years War between England and France lasted from 1337 to 1453, the Russo-Turkish Wars continued from the 17th century well into the 19th, but both came to an end. France and Germany, after several long and bloody wars over two centuries, are now at peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2013 | Times wire services
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Richard Ben Cramer, whose narrative nonfiction spanned presidential politics and the game of baseball, has died. He was 62. Cramer died Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore of complications from lung cancer, said his agent, Philippa Brophy. He won the 1979 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting from the Middle East while working as a foreign correspondent for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Cramer's other notable work included a bestselling biography of New York Yankees great Joe DiMaggio, an influential magazine profile of another baseball star, Ted Williams, and a critically acclaimed, behind-the-scenes account of the 1988 U.S. presidential race, "What It Takes: The Way to the White House.
BOOKS
November 5, 2000 | PETE HAMILL, Pete Hamill is the author of "A Drinking Life: A Memoir," "Snow in August" and "Why Sinatra Matters."
When Joseph Paul DiMaggio died at 84 in 1999, there were few people left alive who had ever seen him play. His time as a ballplayer (1936-1951) preceded the triumph of television and was witnessed by paying customers in an era when there were no major league teams west of the Mississippi. To be sure, his accomplishments as a New York Yankee glittered on the sports pages of the time, and his form as a batter, glimpsed in movie house newsreels, was powerful and elegant.
BOOKS
December 1, 1991 | Robert Hilburn
Baseball is a pastime of memories and myths, all the sweeter for the way the colorful tales of grand victories and bittersweet defeats are expanded upon as they are handed down from generation to generation. But there's always a special place in your heart for the stars of your youth--players, for anyone raised in the '40s and '50s, like The Kid. That was the nickname given Ted Williams because the tall, lanky San Diego native was just 21 when he came up to the big leagues in 1940.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Next year's presidential election, like it or not, may well pit Bob Dole against Bill Clinton. Many voters will shudder at the prospect, forced to choose the lesser of two evils, but political journalists and commentators will have a field day. How often is there so stark a contrast between candidates? It could be the skeletal premise to a '70s movie: in one corner the outgoing, fair-haired, Kennedy-esque, womanizing, draft-avoiding Rhodes scholar who waffles because he sees a grain of truth in every point of view; in the other, the shy, dark, Nixonian, workaholic, indifferent student war hero who's more comfortable attacking others' ideas than articulating his own. Godzilla and Mothra have nothing on Bob and Bill.
BOOKS
August 1, 2004 | Michael Parks, Michael Parks is the director of the School of Journalism at USC's Annenberg School for Communication. He was the editor of The Times from 1997 to 2000 and a Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent for the paper, covering China, Russia, South Africa and the Middle East.
Throughout human history, every war, every conflict, however terrible, however long, has eventually ended. The Hundred Years War between England and France lasted from 1337 to 1453, the Russo-Turkish Wars continued from the 17th century well into the 19th, but both came to an end. France and Germany, after several long and bloody wars over two centuries, are now at peace.
SPORTS
October 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Joe DiMaggio's lawyer cheated him out of several hundred thousand dollars in memorabilia in the last days of his life, according to a biography on the New York Yankee great. In his book, "Joe DiMaggio: The Hero's Life," Richard Ben Cramer zeroed in on Morris Engelberg, DiMaggio's lawyer and friend through the 1990s. "Absurd," said Engelberg from his home in Hollywood, Fla.
BOOKS
November 5, 2000 | PETE HAMILL, Pete Hamill is the author of "A Drinking Life: A Memoir," "Snow in August" and "Why Sinatra Matters."
When Joseph Paul DiMaggio died at 84 in 1999, there were few people left alive who had ever seen him play. His time as a ballplayer (1936-1951) preceded the triumph of television and was witnessed by paying customers in an era when there were no major league teams west of the Mississippi. To be sure, his accomplishments as a New York Yankee glittered on the sports pages of the time, and his form as a batter, glimpsed in movie house newsreels, was powerful and elegant.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Next year's presidential election, like it or not, may well pit Bob Dole against Bill Clinton. Many voters will shudder at the prospect, forced to choose the lesser of two evils, but political journalists and commentators will have a field day. How often is there so stark a contrast between candidates? It could be the skeletal premise to a '70s movie: in one corner the outgoing, fair-haired, Kennedy-esque, womanizing, draft-avoiding Rhodes scholar who waffles because he sees a grain of truth in every point of view; in the other, the shy, dark, Nixonian, workaholic, indifferent student war hero who's more comfortable attacking others' ideas than articulating his own. Godzilla and Mothra have nothing on Bob and Bill.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a pol pumping hands at a fund-raiser, Richard Ben Cramer has the gig down cold: Say hello ("Good to meeetcha!"), sign the book ("Glad you liiiked it!") and move on to the next customer ("Hey, howyadooin?"). Never mind that he's 30 minutes late to his own party. Or that he burst into a Capitol Hill bookstore with sweat pouring off him. The bedraggled author has an excuse . . . just like any candidate running behind. "I couldn't find a cab," Cramer says breathlessly.
BOOKS
July 12, 1992 | Ronald Brownstein, Brownstein is national political correspondent for the Times.
For years, voters and pundits alike have been conducting a deathwatch on American politics. The symptoms are well known: fewer people voting, more negative commercials, debate squeezed into ever shorter sound bites on the evening news. The only thing more depressing than these trends has been the suffocating sense that they are irreversible. Well, don't look now, but the patient is showing signs of life. Voters are suddenly reasserting control over the election process.
BOOKS
December 1, 1991 | Robert Hilburn
Baseball is a pastime of memories and myths, all the sweeter for the way the colorful tales of grand victories and bittersweet defeats are expanded upon as they are handed down from generation to generation. But there's always a special place in your heart for the stars of your youth--players, for anyone raised in the '40s and '50s, like The Kid. That was the nickname given Ted Williams because the tall, lanky San Diego native was just 21 when he came up to the big leagues in 1940.
SPORTS
November 15, 2007 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
You may have missed the announcement, but Baby Ruth is backing a promotion by Major League Baseball in 2008 that will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the song, "Take Me Out to the Ballgame." Since the song mentions only Cracker Jack, we're not sure of the connection, but no matter, it's still a classic. The song was written in 1908 by Jack Norworth, who, according to the old story, was riding a train and saw a sign that said "Ballgame Today at the Polo Grounds."
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