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Richard Bergholz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Richard Nixon lost his race for California governor and delivered his famous promise, "You won't have Nixon to kick around anymore," every reporter in the room knew who "you" meant. It was Richard Bergholz. It also was The Times, for which Bergholz, who died Tuesday at age 83, was then a political writer known for his tough manner, penetrating questions and fair stories. Bergholz, whose career spanned nearly 50 years, suffered a stroke at his home in Pasadena and died at St.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Richard Nixon lost his race for California governor and delivered his famous promise, "You won't have Nixon to kick around anymore," every reporter in the room knew who "you" meant. It was Richard Bergholz. It also was The Times, for which Bergholz, who died Tuesday at age 83, was then a political writer known for his tough manner, penetrating questions and fair stories. Bergholz, whose career spanned nearly 50 years, suffered a stroke at his home in Pasadena and died at St.
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NEWS
September 11, 1986
Los Angeles Times cartoonist Paul Conrad will be the subject of the third annual Roast for Freedom of Information to be presented by the Los Angeles Chapter of the Society for Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, on Sept. 25 at the Century Plaza. The panel of "roasters" will include former President Gerald Ford, syndicated columnist Art Buchwald, California Assembly Speaker Willie Brown, Charles T. Manatt, former chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and a surprise guest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2000 | STEVE HARVEY
In its year-end wrap-up of unusual crimes, the city of Paramount's newsletter recounted the time a resident caught a man breaking into his car. They tussled and the would-be thief ran off. Officers corralled a one-shoed suspect running through a neighborhood and took him back to the scene. Not only did the suspect fit the description, but the one shoe he was wearing matched the one the victim was holding. UNREAL ESTATE: I'll let you look over today's properties first (see accompanying). OK.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000 | STEVE HARVEY
Now we know why O.J. Simpson was involved in a slow-speed pursuit by police. Among the vehicles involved in the current Firestone tire recall are 1994 Ford Broncos. MR. SUBSTITUTION MAN: A last-minute change in the cast for a live performance can be bad news for the audience. But that wasn't the case outside Bunker Hill's California Plaza, where a bluegrass band called the Laurel Canyon Ramblers was supposed to give a free noontime concert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2005 | David Pierson and Jennifer oldham, Times Staff Writers
He had just completed a dramatic commercial jet landing, and there he stood in the cabin receiving cheers and hugs from grateful passengers. The pilot of JetBlue Flight 292 had delivered what experts said was a "perfect" touchdown of a crippled aircraft. Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who spoke to the pilot at Los Angeles International Airport, later identified him to reporters as Scott Burke and praised his heroism.
NEWS
December 4, 1985 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
UNROCKY WEDDING--Sylvester Stallone will indeed wed the beauteous Brigitte Nielsen sometime soon--at least before the wedding reception Dec. 15. Details of the ceremony are unknown, but the black-tie reception is being hosted by his good friends Irwin and Margo Winkler and Ron and Ellen Meyer at the Winklers' Beverly Hills manse. (Winkler produced the "Rocky" saga and Meyer is Stallone's agent.) But, puleeze, if you're lucky enough to be invited, don't bring a gift.
NEWS
September 26, 1994 | GEORGE SKELTON
It's as predictable as autumn brush fires and falling leaves. If it's late September and it's an election year, there are candidates doing the debate dance. There's an underdog desperately pursuing a front-runner, who's playing it coy. Let's debate , pleads the underdog. I'm not ready , says the front-runner. The news media provide the music, and the host gets nervous. For most people watching, this isn't at all interesting. But the dancers and the host become agitated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1998 | KENNETH REICH
One of the most hard-nosed of all the health plans, Blue Cross of California, has yielded ground in recent negotiations with three San Gabriel Valley hospitals, agreeing to raise its reimbursements for medical procedures. The new three-year contract signed in the last two weeks with Huntington Memorial in Pasadena, Methodist in Arcadia and Huntington East Valley in Glendora was subject to the confidentiality provisions that Blue Cross always insists upon, but some details have been leaking out.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | GEORGE SKELTON
"I'm doing fine," Alan Cranston told me four days before he died. He didn't sound fine. He sounded weak. Slightly hoarse. Like he was fighting a cold. Or had just woken from a nap. Whatever, I didn't pursue it. I had called the former senator to ask whether he'd like to be quoted in the paper's obituary about retired Times political writer Richard Bergholz, a Cranston contemporary who died the day after Christmas. I left a message and he called back within an hour.
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