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Richard Biggs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Richard Biggs, a television actor known for his featured roles in such series as "Babylon 5" and "Days of Our Lives," died Saturday after collapsing suddenly at his San Fernando Valley home. He was 44. He was taken to Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, where he died, said Caren Day, a family spokeswoman. The cause was a tear in his aorta. Biggs, a graduate of the USC School of Theatre, portrayed Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Richard Biggs, a television actor known for his featured roles in such series as "Babylon 5" and "Days of Our Lives," died Saturday after collapsing suddenly at his San Fernando Valley home. He was 44. He was taken to Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, where he died, said Caren Day, a family spokeswoman. The cause was a tear in his aorta. Biggs, a graduate of the USC School of Theatre, portrayed Dr.
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NEWS
March 27, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Biggs, in his role as Dr. Stephen Franklin on "Babylon 5," is a master healer--a workaholic who can cure a human cold or bring ailing aliens back to life from inside a massive space station. Off-camera, he knows healing is not so simple. He also knows that being a celebrity gives him powers of another sort: the ability to attract attention to others.
NEWS
March 27, 1998 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Biggs, in his role as Dr. Stephen Franklin on "Babylon 5," is a master healer--a workaholic who can cure a human cold or bring ailing aliens back to life from inside a massive space station. Off-camera, he knows healing is not so simple. He also knows that being a celebrity gives him powers of another sort: the ability to attract attention to others.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1991 | RAY LOYND
Playwright Toby Armour's "Fanon's People," at the Fountain Theatre, is a dark drama of the psychology of the colonized--specifically Algerian victims of French torture and oppression. It's strange how the Algerian struggle for independence (1954-62) has almost slipped from memory. This stark litany of documented case studies reignites a lesson many fail to get: the inner life of rebellion is never quenched.
NEWS
January 23, 1994
It's the dawn of the Third Age of Mankind, a decade after the Earth/Minbari war that nearly destroyed humanity. The Babylon Project was created to establish peace among earthlings and aliens. The first three Babylon stations were sabotaged and destroyed. The fourth one disappeared without a trace. Babylon 5, which is under the jurisdiction of the Earth Alliance, has survived for two years. Who are its architects, commanders and foes?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The term "stage combat" usually refers to a carefully blocked domestic quarrel, or a neatly choreographed duel in tights. Rarely does it involve any depiction of war. Rarely, too, does a play about Vietnam concern itself with the hell and fury of mortar fire. Dramatists tend to deal instead with warriors coming apart before they've left the barracks (David Rabe's "Streamers") or, as in Emily Mann's "Still Life," the aftershocks of a homecoming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1985
Lucienne Gourdon Biggs, an internationally known organist and teacher of liturgical music, died last Saturday in her Hollywood home after a series of illnesses. She was 88. The French native was the youngest lecturer at the Sorbonne, and there she met her husband, organist and composer-conductor Richard Keys Biggs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The Forest of Arden becomes a haven for unregenerate folkies in the Shakespeare/LA version of "As You Like It." Who needs Elizabethan court life, with all that petty familial squabbling, when you can kick back in the woods and sing along to Woody Guthrie, the Weavers and "On Top of Old Smokey"? Shakespeare's comedy is a 400-year-old wonder that doesn't look a day over 250.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2003 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
The beautiful Theatricum Botanicum, tucked away in the hills of Topanga Canyon, opens its 30th anniversary celebration with a rousing production of "King Lear." Any production of "Lear" rises and falls with the actor who plays the title role, one of the most demanding in Shakespeare's canon. Although a bit young for the part, Steve Matt is up to the challenge, conveying Lear's agonizing progression from the proud to the pitiable with subtlety and skill.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1988 | RAY LOYND
"Colors! An Anthem to Cultural Friendship" is not only a barbed prelude to Black History Month but a compelling--make that eye-opening--prelude to white American history as well. Our history books didn't tell us about Thomas Jefferson and his slave mistress of nearly 40 years, Sally Hemmings. Playwright Erwin Washington's one-act, "Sal," sets this curricular omission on its ear in a work that is dramatic and deliciously controversial.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Producing the newly syndicated sci-fi series "Babylon 5" has practically been a sci-fi adventure in itself. "We are on the cusp of being completely revolutionized," says producer John Copeland. The elaborate special effects are created by desktop computers. The series' Hollywood-based composer conducts his European-based orchestra on an interactive video feed. And the entire show is shot in a huge warehouse in the San Fernando Valley, far from any studio's watchful eye.
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