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Richard Billingham

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March 31, 1997 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1990, English artist Richard Billingham began taking photographs of his family. He was 20 at the time, and planned to use the pictures as studies for paintings, so when he left home the following year to study art at the University of Suderland, the photographs went with him. "When I was away at school I'd go home every few months and take more pictures of them. Then a visiting lecturer at school saw some of the photographs lying about my studio," recalls Billingham, who passed through L.A.
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March 31, 1997 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1990, English artist Richard Billingham began taking photographs of his family. He was 20 at the time, and planned to use the pictures as studies for paintings, so when he left home the following year to study art at the University of Suderland, the photographs went with him. "When I was away at school I'd go home every few months and take more pictures of them. Then a visiting lecturer at school saw some of the photographs lying about my studio," recalls Billingham, who passed through L.A.
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March 14, 1997 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Roger Minick's well-known color photographs of tourists visiting national parks and monuments in the western United States, seemingly insignificant details alert viewers to a lurking sense of discomfort. As vacationing families, couples and individuals pose before scenic overlooks and grand vistas, a single clenched fist, a pair of down-turned eyes or the slump of someone's shoulders reveals that the people in these pictures are not gullible victims of some omnipotent tourist industry.
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May 18, 1997 | Suzanne Muchnic, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Despite its growth and evolution as a major art center, Los Angeles has never developed a support structure equal to its home-grown talent. That's the bottom line, and it hasn't changed significantly in the 1990s. But new players have emerged.
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